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eBook The Birds' Christmas Carol download

by Kate Douglas Wiggin

eBook The Birds' Christmas Carol download ISBN: 0874065046
Author: Kate Douglas Wiggin
Publisher: Worthington Press (1990)
Language: English
ePub: 1596 kb
Fb2: 1844 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf txt rtf azw
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Pets and Animal Care

BOSTON AND NEW YORKHOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANYThe Riverside Press Cambridge. Carol, brothers, carol, Carol joyfully, Carol the good tidings, Carol merrily! And pray a gladsome Christmas For all your fellow-men: Carol, brothers, carol, Christmas Day again. One verse followed another, always with the same sweet refrain

With love, CAROL BIRD. Wish you merry Christmas, you dearest birdlings in America! Preen your feathers, and stretch the Birds' nest a trifle, if you please, and let Uncle Jack in for the holidays.

With love, CAROL BIRD. Then Mrs. Bird stepped into her carriage and took the ten books to theChildren's Hospital, and brought home ten others that she had left therethe fortnight before. This was a source of great happiness; for some of the Hospital childrenthat were old enough to print or write, and were strong enough to do it,wrote Carol sweet little letters about the books, and she answered them,and they grew to be friends. It is very funny, but you do not alwayshave to see people to love them.

The Birds' Christmas Carol is a novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin printed privately in 1886 and published in 1888 with illustrations by Katharine R. Wireman. Wiggin published the book to help fund the Silver Street Free Kindergarten, which she founded in 1878. The story is about Carol Bird, a Christmas-born child, a young girl who is unusually loving and generous, having a positive effect on everyone with whom she comes into contact.

Kate Douglas Wiggin (September 28, 1856 – August 24, 1923) was an American educator and author of children's stories, most notably the classic children's novel Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. She started the first free kindergarten in San Francisco in 1878 (the Silver Street Free Kindergarten). With her sister during the 1880s, she also established a training school for kindergarten teachers

Title: The Bird's Christmas Carol. Author: Kate Douglas Wiggin

Title: The Bird's Christmas Carol. Author: Kate Douglas Wiggin. Release Date: January 14, 2008. Bird stepped into her carriage and took the ten books to the Children's Hospital, and brought home ten others that she had left there the fortnight before.

The Birds' Christmas Carol book. Kate Douglas Wiggin was an American educator and author of children's stories, most notably the classic children's novel Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. She started the first free The Birds' Christmas Carol is a novel by Kate Douglas Wiggin printed privately in 1886 and published in 1888, I'm not entirely sure what that means, but that's what it says. It had illustrations originally, but my copy didn't which makes me mad. A little. This is one of those puzzling things I've learned about the author

Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) was an important reformer of children's education at the turn of the century

Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923) was an important reformer of children's education at the turn of the century. During a period when children's place in society was little other than cheap labor, Kate Douglas Wiggin was dedicated to the betterment of youth. She was the first person to found a free kindergarten school in San Francisco in 1878. Her passion for children's rights carried over to her successful career as an author of children's books.

Project Gutenberg's The Bird's Christmas Carol, by Kate Douglas Wiggin. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with.

carousel previous carousel next. A Cathedral Courtship. Author Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin. Project Gutenberg's The Bird's Christmas Carol, by Kate Douglas Wiggin. almost no restrictions whatsoever.

Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin. Born on Christmas Day, Carol is the Bird family's special Christmas baby. Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Notes. This classic Christmas story by the author of Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm features a child as memorable and charitable as Dickens's Tiny Tim. As her tenth birthday approaches, declining health threatens young Carol's life. Her only wish, however, is to plan an unforgettable Christmas celebration for the poor Ruggles children next door.

It was very early on Christmas morning, and in the stillness of the dawn, with the soft snow falling on the housetops, a little child was born in the Bird household.So begins Kate Douglas Wiggin's much-loved tale of Carol Bird, a girl who learned to share the magic of Christmas in her own, very special way. You'll treasure this heartwarming - and heartbreaking - holiday classic.
Comments: (7)
Small Black
My father was killed in World War II when I was 7. The following summer my mother's best friend's parents invited my mother and me to spend the summer at their camp in Northern Wisconsin. The house overflowed with children and we swam and fished and generally acted our various ages, but what I remember best is what happened every night just before bedtime. 'Grandpa', as he asked us all to call him, read us a story. He read Dickens' Christmas Carol, a chapter each night. And then he read "The Birds' Christmas Carol". It is pure Edwardian sentimentality and, as literature, can't compare to Dickens. But something about it helped to comfort my bewildered 7-year-old heart.

I have never forgotten 'Grandpa' and those books. Dickens is easy to come by, but I never came across this book until now. It still starts the tears flowing, but they are tears of gratitude. Perhaps Edwardian sentimentality has its value.
Nikobar
"The Birds' Christmas Carol," first published in 1887, offers a short, interesting read to those who are broad-minded enough to enjoy a little Victorian sentimentality. The author, Kate Douglas Wiggin, also wrote the children's classic, "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm," and was a leader in the American kindergarten education movement.

Aimed at an audience of Victorian children, "The Birds' Christmas Carol" is overly sweet by contemporary literary standards. Carol Bird, the terminally ill heroine, is saintly; and her loving family is somewhat idealized. Nevertheless, the writing is crisp and vivid; and Wiggin successfully evokes family life and the celebration of Christmas in 1880s urban America. To me, this was the most delightful aspect of the book.

As this is a Christmas tale, it could be read aloud during the season along with other Christmas classics. Older children might enjoy reading it for themselves, but parents and teachers should be aware of the facts that the young heroine dies at the end of the book and that the book is mildly religious. In 1887, apparently, religion, serious illness, and death were not as controversial in children's books as they are today.
Faell
I read a part of this a long time ago when I was younger in one of those books with snippets from lots of different children's stories. It was the part from the Ruggleses' point of view and I LOVED it and thought it was so funny. I decided to read the full thing this year--I was a little disappointed it wasn't all from the Ruggles children's point of view, but oh well. Carol Bird is good--almost angelic--and so it can be difficult to relate to her or feel much for her. However, she is very sweet and kind, and so that redeems her from being a cardboard-like "good character". Uncle Jack--there's not a whole lot about him but I wish there was! He's awesome. ;) Overall it's a light, thoughtful and amusing read and I'd recommend it.
Larosa
I read this as a girl and remember loving it, so I reordered it for myself. It's a sad, 19th century tale of a young girl's generous spirit and peaceful passing--a kind of morality tale for the time period. Reading it as an adult, many parts made me giggle at the hyperbolic stereotypes, yet others reminded me of our need to treat one another with more grace.
HyderCraft
My mother use to read to us as children, this book left a mark on me. It was a good story but it is a tear jerker. I am in my 50's now and my mother passed a few years back. When I went through her house I looked for this book and I could not find it. I could only remember "Christmas Carol". I asked my brother and sure enough he remembered. I have the best memories of this book there was my older brother and I and 3 neighbor kids she use to read to us for an hour or two at night.
Bralore
family tradition. My grandmother's mom read it to her, she to my mom . . . check out the author's more famous books and you will be sold. Sad in some sense because Carol is sick but a heartwarming story, more for the slightly older crowd than the pre-K but its fun to pass along the tradition. Too bad its not a beautifully bound version but its ultimately the words that matter.
Ubrise
All the things said about this story in the other positive reviews are true. This story teaches timeless lessons. It is very touching. Its values are spot on. And it has the elements of a "classic." As a "Christmas" book it achieves the rare balance of addressing the nostalgic "spirit of Christmas" while also not forgetting the true reason for Christmas...namely Christ and His Spirit. That said, this story is near impossible for a child to read. It was difficult for this relatively literary dad to read. The reason is that there are long stretches written quoting people in a slang dialect from some time in the 19th century. This dialect is completely foreign to us today making it difficult to figure out what it is that they are supposed to be saying. Even the true "english" in the story is often structured in the manner common to 19th century writing. This also is difficult for little ones to follow. If you have older children (8+) and are up for working through some of the linguistic issues, this book has a lot to offer.
When I was a child, an aunt gave us a copy of this book. We read and thoroughly enjoyed that book till it was singed years later in a house fire. Now, I have the eBook. There's so much to love about this story--from the doting Bird parents and brothers, to visiting Uncle Jack, to the fiesty Mrs. Ruggles and her ragamuffin children next door, to the long-suffering but big-hearted Carol who brings them all together for an unforgettable holiday. This is a classic for the whole family to read and re-read every Christmas season.