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eBook The Woodwright’s Guide: Working Wood with Wedge and Edge download

by Roy Underhill

eBook The Woodwright’s Guide: Working Wood with Wedge and Edge download ISBN: 0807832456
Author: Roy Underhill
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; New edition edition (November 17, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1387 kb
Fb2: 1312 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf txt lrf rtf
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Home Improvement and Design

For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool craftsmanship . The Woodwright's Guide captures the true glory and mystery of the material that built this country, from the first swing of the axe to the final shaving of a smoothing plane.

For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool craftsmanship to viewers across America. Roy Underhill's impressive technical knowledge, respect for traditional methods, and amusing storytelling make this his finest effort to date. I devoured every word and enjoyed it immensely.

Электронная книга "The Woodwright’s Guide: Working Wood with Wedge and Edge", Roy Underhill. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Woodwright’s Guide: Working Wood with Wedge and Edge" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Roy Underhill's impressive technical knowledge, respect for traditional methods, and amusing storytelling make this . I have several of Roy's other Woodwright's Guide books. This one is mostly a repeat of what's in those. If you don't have the others, then you will enjoy this one.

Roy Underhill's impressive technical knowledge, respect for traditional methods, and amusing storytelling make this his finest effort to date.

Roy Underhill brings to woodworking the intimate relationship with wood that craftsmen enjoyed in the days before . Now, in his seventh book, Roy shows how to engage the mysteries of the splitting wedge and the cutting edge to shape wood from forest to furniture.

Roy Underhill brings to woodworking the intimate relationship with wood that craftsmen enjoyed in the days before power tools. Beginning with a guide to trees and tools, The Woodwright's Shopincludes chapters on gluts and mauls, shaving horses, rakes, chairs, weaving wood, hay forks, dough bowls, lathes, blacksmithing, dovetails, panel-frame construction, log houses, and timber-frame construction. 224 Pages PDF 97 MB 16. The Woodwright's Guide - Working Wood With Wedge & Edge - Roy Underhill.

The Woodwright's Guide book. For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool craftsmanship to viewers across America

The Woodwright's Guide book. For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool craftsmanship to viewers across America.

The Woodwright’s Guide: Working Wood with Wedge and Edge. A special concluding section contains detailed plans for making your own foot-powered lathes, workbenches, shaving horses, and taps and dies for wooden screws. The Woodwright's Guide is informed by a lifetime of experience and study. A former master craftsman at Colonial Williamsburg, Roy has inspired millions to "just say no to power tools" through his continuing work as a historian, craftsman, activist, and teacher.

For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool . Beginning with the standing tree, each chapter of The Woodwright's Guide explores one of nine trades of woodcraft: faller, countryman and cleaver, hewer, log-builder, sawyer, carpenter, joiner, turner, and cabinetmaker.

Roy Underhill probably needs no introduction to PBS viewers given that his show, The Woodwright’s Shop, is nearing it’s fourth decade of production. This, his seventh book, would make an excellent primer to his TV series

Wood chipper & Log splitter - BUILD - Продолжительность: 20:34 Made in Poland Recommended for you. 20:34

Wood chipper & Log splitter - BUILD - Продолжительность: 20:34 Made in Poland Recommended for you. 20:34.

For thirty years, Roy Underhill's PBS program, The Woodwright's Shop, has brought classic hand-tool craftsmanship to viewers across America. Now, in his seventh book, Roy shows how to engage the mysteries of the splitting wedge and the cutting edge to shape wood from forest to furniture.Beginning with the standing tree, each chapter of The Woodwright's Guide explores one of nine trades of woodcraft: faller, countryman and cleaver, hewer, log-builder, sawyer, carpenter, joiner, turner, and cabinetmaker. Each trade brings new tools and techniques; each trade uses a different character of material; but all are united by the grain in the wood and the enduring mastery of muscle and steel.Hundreds of detailed drawings by Eleanor Underhill (Roy's daughter) illustrate the hand tools and processes for shaping and joining wood. A special concluding section contains detailed plans for making your own foot-powered lathes, workbenches, shaving horses, and taps and dies for wooden screws.The Woodwright's Guide is informed by a lifetime of experience and study. A former master craftsman at Colonial Williamsburg, Roy has inspired millions to "just say no to power tools" through his continuing work as a historian, craftsman, activist, and teacher. In The Woodwright's Guide, he takes readers on a personal journey through a legacy of off-the-grid, self-reliant craftsmanship. It's a toolbox filled with insight and technique as well as wisdom and confidence for the artisan in all of us.
Comments: (7)
Ueledavi
From what I understand, this book is almost a compilation of some of Roy Underhill's other works. This is my first of his books so I cannot be offended if some of the info is rehash. I've slowly come to like, but not love, Roy's show the Woodwright's Shop, so I though that I would give the book a try.
Woodworking with "wedge and edge." I suppose every woodworker realizes that when dealing with wood you are either cutting it's fibres or splitting them. I did, but the book actually brought that line of thinking/idea into true clarity to me for the first time. This really did change the way I saw, use a chisel, and even use power tools, so at that the book helped a great deal.
Much of the book centers of the process of creating furniture from tree to finished product. It is less of a how-to book and uses a bit of storytelling to get the knowledge across, which worked for me though some may not enjoy it as much. Towards the end of the book there are plans for a workbench and a lathe that I thought could have been more clearly presented. The workbench in particular interested me, I just didn't care for the plans.
Overall I liked the book though I'm not overly sure if I would purchase another book by Roy Underhill. Other reviewers on Amazon and other sites have stated that this book is quite similar to prior books of his. As I said, I thought it was enjoyable and I learned from it, but I wouldn't pay for it twice.
Samuhn
This, the sixth in Underhill's Woodwright series, is more tool and process oriented than the others. I really like this one for its practical teachings.

I do have an axe to grind, however. The Product Description above says "A special concluding section contains detailed plans for making your own foot-powered lathes, ...." Aah, I thought, I'll finally get plans for building that treadle lathe Underhill has been teasing me with for five books. If you, like me, think "detailed plans" will give you true shop drawings, lists of materials, and instructions that, if you follow them will give you a working lathe at the end; then you, like me, will be very disappointed. He does give you more than in the past, but be prepared for much head scratching and trial and error. If I do go ahead and try to build one, I'm going to make sure I have at least three of everything on hand.

Over all, this is perhaps his best book yet. I just don't understand why he's so stingy with his plans.
Onnell
I have several of Roy's other Woodwright's Guide books. This one is mostly a repeat of what's in those. If you don't have the others, then you will enjoy this one. If you do have the others, you will still enjoy this one, because that's how he writes, but you won't learn as much.
riki
Roy Underhill has that rare gift of imparting complex technique in a straight-forward manner so that beginners are able to grasp what the master understands clearly. This book endeavors to bring the understanding of connection of systems so that any one task is a part of a large knowledge base which can be accessed via our national history. Learning why we do things and how we can continue the solid technique that has been laid out for us to follow gives notion to the pride of leaving this world with something worth keeping. Roy Underhill is helping us to preserve not only our national identity but also our human ingenuity as the skills learned from the "Woodwrights Guide..." remains over time to teach new students the value of self sufficiency.
Beranyle
I have been watching The Woodwright Shop on TV for 30 years. I have purchased all of Roy's books as they came out. At first I thought this was just a selective reprint of the others but now that I have read it I truly believe this is his best one yet. It covers the topics of the other books and pulls out the true "liquor" of knowledge of the other books. Certainly it is because of this person I have been doing blacksmithing and traditional woodworking for decades now. He is a wonderful and steadfast inspiration.
Mushicage
Excellent read for anyone interested in hand tool methods and history. I think a novice could get a lot out of this, but I was glad I read this after having some hand tool experience because I found it very informative and meaningful. I would recommend reading this once as a novice and returning for a second read after a year of hand tool work experience. Roy Underhill is a master.
Dorintrius
I like Ole Roy.

I appreciate the time and skill required to make furniture without the use of electrons!

I don't build furniture to make my living, rather to relax. And it is much more enjoyable to plane away sweet shavings than listen to that electric motor grind away at my beautiful walnut.
Good range of projects for beginners and experienced Woodworkers