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eBook Good Bug Bad Bug: Who's Who, What They Do, and How to Manage Them Organically (All You Need to Know about the Insects in Your Garden) download

by Jessica Walliser

eBook Good Bug Bad Bug: Who's Who, What They Do, and How to Manage Them Organically (All You Need to Know about the Insects in Your Garden) download ISBN: 0976763192
Author: Jessica Walliser
Publisher: St. Lynn's Press (June 1, 2008)
Language: English
ePub: 1665 kb
Fb2: 1201 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf docx doc lrf
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Gardening and Landscape Design

If you have a garden, you need this book.

Includes strategies for dealing with the new bugs in town. I do like the information provided on how to encourage each beneficial, but many of them could have been treated in a table. If you have a garden, you need this book.

Good Bug Bad Bug book. Garden expert Jessica Walliser also offers strategies for dealing with the new bugs in town, those worrisome st Good Bug Bad Bug lets you quickly identify the most common invasive and beneficial insects (and other tiny critters) in your garden, and gives the best organic advice on how to attract the good guys and manage the bad guyswithout reaching for the toxic chemicals.

Now fully updated, "Good Bug Bad Bug" is an indispensable field guide for quickly and easily identifying the most common invasive and beneficial insects in the garden. Forty-one bugs are presented in full color on laminated card stock, with concealed wire binding. 2 people like this topic.

Good bug, bad bug. who's who, what they do, and how to manage them organically: all you need to know about the insects in your . who's who, what they do, and how to manage them organically: all you need to know about the insects in your garden. 1st ed. by Jessica Walliser. Published 2008 by St. Lynn's Press in Pittsburgh. Garden pests, Beneficial insects, Biological control, Organic gardening, Insect pests, Internet Archive Wishlist.

Good Bug Bad Bug Who s Who, What They Do, and How to Manage Them Organically All You Need to Know .

Good Bug Bad Bug Who s Who, What They Do, and How to Manage Them Organically All You Need to Know about the Insects in Your Garden (Jessica Walliser). Good Bug Bad Bug lets you quickly identify the most common invasive and beneficial insects (and other tiny critters) in your garden, and gives the best organic advice on how to attract the good guys and manage the bad guyswithout reaching for the toxic chemicals. Garden expert Jessica Walliser also offers strategies for dealing with the new bugs in town, those worrisome strangers that are starting to show up as a result of climate change.

Good Bug Bad Bug lets you quickly identify the most common invasive and beneficial insects (and other tiny critters) in your garden, and gives the best organic advice on how to attract the good guys and manage the bad guyswithout reaching for the toxic chemicals.

Author (1): Jessica Walliser. This book provides much-needed assistance to novice gardeners or children, who can use it as a field guide, while giving helpful details and tidbits for more advanced gardeners. Feedback History and Summary

Author (1): Jessica Walliser. Feedback History and Summary. No positives No neutrals No negatives. Return to the Garden Bookworm homepage.

Good Bug Bad Bug lets you quickly identify the most common invasive and beneficial insects (and other tiny critters) in your garden, and gives the best organic advice on how to attract the good guys and manage the bad guyswithout reaching for the toxic chemicals. Garden expert Jessica Walliser also offers strategies for dealing with the new bugs in town, those worrisome strangers that are starting to show up as a result of climate change. Thirty-six bugs, presented in full color on laminated stock, with concealed wire binding. Sturdy enough to take into the garden for easy reference.
Comments: (7)
Gaiauaco
i don't know, what do I know about "bug books." It's layout is remarkable, I guess. Meaning, that using it as a resource and identifying bugs, the way it's laid out, make it easy to use. The information within seems pretty inclusive. I bought it because of someone else's recommendation and I'm not disappointed at all. I would buy it again. I got a used copy for what I thought was a great price, although I can't recall what I paid, but it was just a few dollars. Well worth it. I also think this would be a great book for a child and not just for a gardener type. The only criticism is, as a entomology enthusiast, or an adult that is still a big kid at heart and likes bugs, always have, and as a permaculture fan, I don't think there's a "bad" bug. All bugs have their place. That may seem weird to many, but that is nature. No, I'm not some "tree hugger, hippy, all of Gods creatures are beautiful..."...well, maybe a little. ;)
Anyway...if you're into gardening, but don't know much about the bugs that want to eat your veggies, get the book. If you want to know more about permaculture and why there are no bad bugs, use google and educate yourself.
Alexandra
Since I do not use pesticides around our place (we raise poultry and they will eat anything), I really like to know which are the good bugs and which ones I should squish. I also have several kids that are very interested in bugs so I figured that this book would kill two birds with one stone.

The book is spiral bound and very pretty. However, this book lacks significant details that one needs. Most of the pictures of the bugs are from the side and often not even zoomed in enough that you can easily make out the bug. There are many bad bugs that look very much like good bugs. This book does not explain any of the physical differences between these look a likes. In fact the book does not even mention the look a likes. The advice from the book is to sit and watch the bug and see what it does to decide if it is good or bad for your garden.

What pictures are provided often only show the mature bug. In some instances, it also shows the larval stages, but not usually. To turely provide a vauable identification guide, pictures from the side and top should be provided.

The book offers suggestions about what to do if you find the bugs. Most of the time, the suggestion is neem or pyrethrins. I do want to give a huge kudo for pointing out that ducks and geese offer great "biological control" with slugs. Chickens, turkeys, and guineas also offer wonderful biological controls for many bugs.

Overall I was disappointed in the book. I believe that Edward Smith's "The Vegetable Gardener's Bible" offers better descriptions and pictures (though they are drawings). My oldest son also has several general bug books that are much better in their detail and descriptions.
Muniath
I live in Honolulu and I started to love gardening about a few months a go. So, practically I'm a newbie.
As a newbie many times I was panic when I saw bugs on the leaves in my very small garden in lanai or balcony. Freak out ! Then my husband told me, some bugs helps gardener by eat the pest...but we didn't know which one. This book helping me so much...and why I gave 4 stars, because not complete. Sometimes I saw the bugs and I didn't find in this book. Anyway, this book just really good book and the pictures soooo beautiful and clear, easy to understand too.
Tiv
I bought and read this book and I'm disappointed. It helped me identify and learn something about three of the six troubling bugs in my garden (scale, winged aphids, and cabbage worms), but it doesn't have leaf footed bugs or 2 others that I have in my garden and I need to identify. This book doesn't have pictures of the multiple life stages, and it doesn't have pictures of the damage the bugs cause to identify them by, like one of the reviews led me to believe. This book is not thorough or complete enough for what I need it for, which is to identify and counteract the bugs building populations in my plants. I've found better guides online (for free), and I will need to buy another book. This time I will try to find one that is clearly technical, and I will try to preview a copy in the library system before buying. It is clear that a lot of hard work went into making this book, but it's not useful enough.
Anarius
This book was recommended to me as a must-read for the organic gardener. It certainly is that. Since I received it, I keep it close at hand, referring to it often. It's a very handy size and format(sturdy, spiral-bound,washable cover). So far, I've concentrated on the pests, since that's what I've been dealing with in this my first organic gardening venture (after 40 years of gardening with chemicals). On two pages is the DESCRIPTION of the pest, PHOTOS showing both the insect (in its adult and sometimes larval stages) as well as the damage it does,how to SPOT THE DAMAGE, PLANTS THEY ATTACK,PREVENTIVE ACTIONS you can take,ORGANIC PRODUCT CONTROLS and LIVE BIOLOGICAL CONTROLS you can use,as well as other helpful information. I haven't looked into the beneficial insects yet, but they give information about the LIFE CYCLE, PESTS THEY CONTROL, HOW TO ATTRACT AND KEEP THEM, as well as other pertinent information.
Boraston
Have found many answers to what is eating my vegetables, with organic pest control suggestions.
Kelezel
Great reference book - an easy way to learn quickly about the insects in your garden and their particular role in Nature.
Great book at a nice price.