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eBook Plants For Dry Climates: How to Select, Grow Enjoy download

by Warren Jones,Mary Rose Duffield

eBook Plants For Dry Climates: How to Select, Grow  Enjoy download ISBN: 1555612709
Author: Warren Jones,Mary Rose Duffield
Publisher: Fisher Books (April 21, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1335 kb
Fb2: 1179 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit lrf mbr lrf
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Gardening and Landscape Design

Mary Rose Duffield is an award-winning landscape architect with an active practice designing landscapes throughout the Southwest.

Mary Rose Duffield is an award-winning landscape architect with an active practice designing landscapes throughout the Southwest. Warren Jones is a fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects. A retired professor of landscape architecture at the University of Arizona, he now serves on the advisory board of the Boyce Thompson Southwest Arboretum in Superior, Arizona. He is the co-author of Landscape Plants for Dry Regions.

Plants for dry climates book. by Mary Rose Duffield. Jonni Jones added it Aug 08, 2016. Story Song marked it as to-read Feb 06, 2017.

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You Might Also Enjoy. Southwest gardeners who live in very dry areas will benefit from Mary Rose Duffield and Warren Jones' Plants For Dry Climates, an informative, "user friendly" book which tells how to build and maintain a landscape on very little water

You Might Also Enjoy. Southwest gardeners who live in very dry areas will benefit from Mary Rose Duffield and Warren Jones' Plants For Dry Climates, an informative, "user friendly" book which tells how to build and maintain a landscape on very little water. Plants For Dry Climates and a focus on organizing a planting area based on usage makes for a title which tells how plants can improve the climate around one's house. com User, September 23, 1999. The plant dictionary is very thorough, and helpful

oceedings{, title {Plants for Dry Climates: How to Select, Grow and Enjoy. author {Mark F. Duffield and Walter Dickson Jones}, year {1981} }.

oceedings{, title {Plants for Dry Climates: How to Select, Grow and Enjoy. Mark F. Duffield, Walter Dickson Jones. View PDF. Save to Library.

Plants for Dry Climates by Mary Rose Duffield and Warren Jones. Plants for Dry Climates is a unique book that caters to this thirsty audience, with information that comprises both good landscape design and essential cultural information for nearly 450 plants. It provides readers with information they need to plan a complete landscape that includes both mini-oasis features as well as arid-landscape plantings.

Plants for Dry Climates offers complete descriptions of more than 300 . You will also learn how to modify the microclimate in your garden or landscape.

Plants for Dry Climates offers complete descriptions of more than 300 species, including a variety of low-maintenance and drought-resistant plants. Over 430 color photographs and useful plant charts help you choose your annuals, perennial color, ground cover and trees. Reduce glare and control wind and air flow to create the perfect atmosphere for your landscape plants. Warren Jones is the coauthor of Plants for Dry Climates, Fisher Books, 1998. - Sun City News-Sun 03/21/04.

The desert Southwest is booming, with western counties consistently leading in population growth over the past decade

The desert Southwest is booming, with western counties consistently leading in population growth over the past decade. Yet while the Southwest has plenty of people and plenty of heat and sunshine, water remains at a premium. From Southern California to West Texas, in Arizona and Nevada and New Mexico, homeowners seek new ways to enjoy a lush environment while conserving precious water resources.

Author (1): Mary Rose Duffield Author (2): Warren D. Jones. Beautiful pictures and detailed info on many heat tolerant plants. Gives pros and cons for each plant. Very reliable and honest regarding growing requirements. Return to the Garden Bookworm homepage.

C4 plants grow best at 95○F. They begin to grow when the soil temperature is 60-65○F. Forage of C4 species is generally lower in protein than C3 plants but the protein is more efficiently used by animals. C4 plants can be annual or perennial. Annual C4 plants include corn, sudangrass, and pearlmillet. k views · View 1 Upvoter.

Packed with full-color photos, easy-to-read charts and information, this reference and how-to book is a necessity for anyone interested in dry-climate plants. It teaches you how to personalize your garden or landscape design. Plants for Dry Climates offers complete descriptions of more than 300 species, including a variety of low-maintenance and drought-resistant plants. Over 430 color photographs and useful plant charts help you choose your annuals, perennial color, ground cover and trees. You will also learn how to modify the microclimate in your garden or landscape. Reduce glare and control wind and air flow to create the perfect atmosphere for your landscape plants. Combined with detailed information on growth characteristics and specific soil, sun, water, temperature and maintenance needs, you'll have all you need to successfully grow plants in California and the Southwest.
Comments: (7)
Globus
This is one of two gardening books we bought after moving to Arizona two years ago; the other is "Arizona Gardener's Guide" by Mary Irish. Of the two, this is probably the more informative, but the wealth of information it contains is not presented in the most user-friendly way. Plants are listed using their proper botanical names (i.e. in Latin) rather than the common names that most people are likely to be familiar with. The photography is first-rate, and the "how to" explanations are mostly clear and easy to follow. If you live in Arizona, and only want to buy one book, I'd recommend the Arizona Gardener's Guide, as it is AZ-specific. If you live outside Arizona, this is probably the better choice -- although you might want to buy both, as they have different strengths.
MilsoN
If you live in a dry climate, this book can be very helpful. It has a great breakdown of the different arid climates that I think is more useful than the traditional zones. It addresses the ingredients of your climate including cold and frost, heat, rainfall, winds, and humidity. It also has a section of microclimates.The charts and illustrations are great. I liked the descriptions of the plants, especially the notes on special design features, uses, disadvantages, and planting and care. I found this to be an all-around useful book.
Ventelone
Although this book supposedly covers my region of New Mexico, I found so little in it that applied to me that I am returning it. Three-fourths of the book is a plant reference, and most of the plants are not cold hardy below 20 degrees Fahrenheit, making about half the book wasted paper as far as I am concerned. Also, a lot of xeric standards for this region are missing.
If you can, check the map on pages 2-3 to make sure that you live in the Low or Middle regions (as I write this, the map is included in the scanned pages here on Amazon, but isn't displaying properly). For the High region, I recommend instead any of the books by Judith Phillips, who writes toward climates that are slightly wetter and somewhat cooler than the ones that are the focus here.
Bluddefender
This is a good, basic reference book for anyone who works with or just enjoys plants and lives in a desert environment. I had gotten rid of my older copy and missed it so much I ordered this one. This one is a newer version and has color pictures! Not fancy, just good information on a wide variety of plants.
Boyn
Maybe because there are few other works on the subject it is the one to own but it is hardly encyclopedic. It seems to have everything listed and illustrated but can only be a jumping off reference to further research if you plan to grow the plant yourself.
Nikojas
Lived in a desert most of my life. Nice to see some pretty gardens and landscaping that are thrifty on water
Sadaron above the Gods
I had an earlier version of the book which was the best one on the subject matter (I had bought several other books on the subject before I found this one). It was over 25 years old and coming apart, so I wanted a new one. It was expanded from the earlier version which was very helpful.
Came highly recommended by a desert landscape architecture instructor in the Tucson, AZ area. I found it very helpful.