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by Gale E. Christianson

eBook Greenhouse: The 200-Year Story of Global Warming download ISBN: 0802713467
Author: Gale E. Christianson
Publisher: Walker & Co; 1 edition (May 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 305
ePub: 1185 kb
Fb2: 1836 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Christianson, Gale E. Publication date. New York : Walker and Company.

Christianson, Gale E. ark:/13960/t6349t88j.

He has a knack for bringing the quirky personalities of the many scientists involved in the discovery of the greenhouse effect to life. Yet, Christianson inexplicably accords the well-known greenhouse skeptic Fred Singer's criticisms of greenhouse theory more respect than this coal and oil industry-funded mouthpiece deserves. In fact, my criticism of the book is that it contains precious little analysis.

Home . Details for: Greenhouse : the 200-year story of global warming . Details for: Greenhouse : the 200-year story of global warming /. Normal view MARC view ISBD view. Greenhouse : the 200-year story of global warming, Gale E. Christianson. By: Christianson, Gale E. Material type: BookPublisher: New York : Hyderabad ; Walker and Company ; Universities Press, c1999 Description: xiii, 305 p. : ill. ; 24 c. SBN: 8173712352; 0802713467. Subject(s): Global warming - HistoryDDC classification: 36. 3874 Online resources: Table of Contents. Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

For most people the threat of global warming seems a contemporary one. For Christianson it is an absorbing historical and scientific process intertwined with two centuries of civilisation and 300 billion years in the life of the planet. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. Citations (7). References (0).

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Home Browse Books Book details, Greenhouse: The 200-Year Story of Global Warming. Greenhouse: The 200-Year Story of Global Warming. By Gale E. One day, at the beginning of the geologic epoch called the Pleistocene, Earth's skies turned an ominous gray.

In fact, my criticism of the book is that it contains precious little analysis. Christianson is a gifted storyteller, and no doubt many will enjoy his entertaining narrative. But the reader who seeks insight and understanding into why our society privileges technology at the expense of nature will need to look elsewhere.

Much of Christianson's take on explaining global warming is by using this formula: present a little bit of proof, then go on for . There are better books out there, even for those supportive of the idea of global warming and the greenhouse affect.

Much of Christianson's take on explaining global warming is by using this formula: present a little bit of proof, then go on for the next few pages presenting horrible images of what might happen IF global warming happened. Christianson will name-drop tropical storms and talk about the damage they caused, but presents little evidence about why, exactly, (save for one or two facts from the same group of sources) the actions are related. For example, on page 233 she mentions Typhoon Winnie hitting China. And that's pretty much all she says.

Gale addresses so many aspects of the controversy we now know as global warming its difficult to summarize them

Gale addresses so many aspects of the controversy we now know as global warming its difficult to summarize them . com User, August 29, 2000. A beautiful book full of understanding and love for the planet.

Finding the clues to global warming both deep in the past and right before our eyes, Christianson introduces a. .

Finding the clues to global warming both deep in the past and right before our eyes, Christianson introduces a memorable and unlikely cast of characters and events. From the demise of the Anasazi in the American Southwest and the Vikings in Greenland, which unveil the close connection between global warming and cooling, to the politics behind the 1997 Kyoto Conference on the Environment, Christianson delves deep into the connection between human beings and the planet.

An intriguing study of the Greenhouse Effect and its impact on human history and the environment examines the causes and consequences of global warming and cooling, the rise in carbon dioxide atmospheric levels, and the various cycles that have occurred throughout Earth's history.
Comments: (5)
Keath
Gale Christianson has made the science of global warming and climate change accessible to the general public with his book "Greenhouse." He has a knack for bringing the quirky personalities of the many scientists involved in the discovery of the greenhouse effect to life. He helps the reader easily understand the significance of each scientist's contribution and makes their scientific inquiries read like a great mystery novel.
Gale's synthesis of material is creative. He includes the story of the Anasazi of the American southwest, the Viking settlement in Greenland and others when discussing the impact changing climactic conditions have had on humans in the past. The author includes profiles of scientists who theorized and then later documented the greenhouse effect (such as Svante Arrhenius) as well as the entrepreneurs whose inventions have contributed significantly to the problem (such as Ford).
The author addresses the issue of why the earth experienced a slight cooling trend from the 1940s to the early 1970s, prior to the more recent period of steadily rising temperatures: the period in question witnessed twice the normal amount of volcanic activity, which helped block sunlight from reaching the earth.
The evidence cited by the author strongly suggests that the earth is warming due to human activity. Yet, Christianson inexplicably accords the well-known greenhouse skeptic Fred Singer's criticisms of greenhouse theory more respect than this coal and oil industry-funded mouthpiece deserves. If the author did this in order to appear objective, he did so at the cost of confusing corporate propaganda with real science.
In fact, my criticism of the book is that it contains precious little analysis. Christianson is a gifted storyteller, and no doubt many will enjoy his entertaining narrative. But the reader who seeks insight and understanding into why our society privileges technology at the expense of nature will need to look elsewhere.
Still, I think Christianson has succeeded in his mission of writing a great book for the general interest science reader. It should help further the cause of making the science of global warming an increasingly popular topic of conversation in our society.
Reemiel
Gale Christianson gives a wonderful, dynamic historical account of global warming. Gale addresses so many aspects of the controversy we now know as global warming its difficult to summarize them. She explores 16th and 17th century scientists and their discoveries about the world, from evolution to the impacts of pollution, to the creation of the coal-burning engines that caused England to erect higher and higher smokestacks believing that the smoke would simply float away into the atmosphere. Gale also speaks of the global climate changes that have occurred across the history of humankind as we know it. She explains the tortuous trip that brought the Vikings to settle in Greenland, and the climate shifts that ceased their existence on the frosty continent. She explores the history of the Anasazi and the changes in their biospheres that chased them from their homes built high in the Southwestern US. Gale explains all the differing theories that address the effects of global warming, ending with the fact that we don't really know what the impact will be in the future. She dialogues the negotiations that occurred in Kyoto Japan and the political atmosphere that makes reductions in emissions so difficult. A wonderful account, reads like a novel with dynamic characters, interesting plot changes, and mysteries that may never be solved. Although it does not bring to light anything new to explain global warming, it is a superb overview of global warming as we know it, and why it is such a controversy today.
Phenade
I highly recommend this well-written, exhaustively researched history of global warming. The author takes us on the path of energy use by Western societies, in particular Britain and Europe, that began about 200 years ago with the insatiable burning of coal. Back then, for a while, at least, people acted out of ignorance when it came to consuming carbon-generating energy sources, although the asphyxiating fogs that beset some British cities ought to have been a wake-up call at the time. Today, according to the author (and I agree), there is sufficient evidence that we are continuing to warm the planet at an alarming, unsustainable rate. Christianson offers a balanced, intellectual rather than emotional treatment of the greenhouse gas emission issues. I pray that at least some of the world's leaders in government and industry read this book, or allow themselves to be influenced by others who accept Christianson's story and what it portends.
Dogrel
I have just finished reading Gale's book, and I say that with much sadness, because I have enjoyed it so much I didn't want it to finish. I work in the field of climate change, so I make to my business to keep up-to-date. Gale is certainly accurate. His historical approach is also quite delightful - if only other historians had such an easy touch. His story of how we came to use fossil fuels and how we came to understand their impact on our atmosphere is fascinating, rich, full of intriguing detail, and from my viewpoint, very well researched. There is nothing hysterical about this book - just honest, insightful, delightful reporting. I might just read it all over again !