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eBook Picture Perfect Knits download

by Laura Birek

eBook Picture Perfect Knits download ISBN: 081186068X
Author: Laura Birek
Publisher: Chronicle Books (October 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1297 kb
Fb2: 1864 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw lrf mobi lit
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Crafts and Hobbies

Picture Perfect Knits.

Picture Perfect Knits. There's no tricky double stranding and knitters can incorporate intarsia into almost any project-be it a cozy blanket or tiny mittens. This handy guide includes instructions to make 12 projects plus more than 50 intarsia graphs that can be used to customize almost any knit. Clear instructions, helpful illustrations, and finished project photos make it simple to learn the.

Издательство: Chronicle Books. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Picture Perfect Knits" is a new knitting book by Laura Birek, to be published in Fall 2008! .

Picture Perfect Knits" is a new knitting book by Laura Birek, to be published in Fall 2008! Here's a description o. .Picture Perfect Knits. 15 March 2011 ·. Attention knitting fans! For the next three days, I'm giving away 100% of my pattern sale proceeds to the IFRC to support disaster relief in Japan.

Picture Perfect Knits book.

, Laura Birek I am the author of the knitting book Picture Perfect Knits, which was released in Fall 2008 from Chronicle Books.

I am the author of the knitting book Picture Perfect Knits, which was released in Fall 2008 from Chronicle Books

Picture Perfect Knits - Laura Birek. Picture Perfect Knits will show you that intarsia can be easy and beautiful. All it takes are a few simple skills, a bit of creativity, and a willingness to throw your preconceived notions out the window.

Picture Perfect Knits - Laura Birek. Step-by-Step Intarsia with More than 75 Inspiring Patterns. In the first section of the book I explain the basics of the technique and show you how to navigate intarsia charts and create your own patterns.

Books related to Picture Perfect Knits. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.

There's no tricky double stranding and knitters can incorporate intarsia into almost any project-be it a cozy blanket or tiny mittens. Clear instructions, helpful illustrations, and finished project photos make it simple to learn the basics. Books related to Picture Perfect Knits.

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Laura Birek the Knitter I'm the author of Picture Perfect Knits, a book all about the intarsia technique, and I blog about knitting at Nocturnal.

Laura Birek the Knitter. I first picked up knitting needles during my sophomore year at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. I was looking for a non-academic hobby to help me relax, and more than 10 years later, knitting has turned into a career. I absolutely love knitting, and always have a project on my needles. I'm the author of Picture Perfect Knits, a book all about the intarsia technique, and I blog about knitting at Nocturnal Knits.

Just what the heck is intarsia anyway? One of the most overlooked knitting techniques, intarsia allows knitters to add graphicsthink argyle diamonds or mod motifsto their knits. There's no tricky double stranding and knitters can incorporate intarsia into almost any projectbe it a cozy blanket or tiny mittens. This handy guide includes instructions to make 12 projects plus more than 50 intarsia graphs that can be used to customize almost any knit. Clear instructions, helpful illustrations, and finished project photos make it simple to learn the basics. There are even some blank charts so knitters can invent their own patterns. It's easy. It's fun. And the results are totally picture perfect!Special guest designers include: Lena Corwin, Jenny Hart of Sublime Stitching, Sarah Neuberger of Small Object, Shannon Okey of Knitgrrl, Denyse Schmidt, and more!
Comments: (7)
SadLendy
I just didn't like it all that much. I don't know why. The pictures did nothing to inspire me, but the method is well explained, which is what matters.
Fenrinos
When you shop for knitting books from online knitting stores, you can preview the images of the completed projects rather than an introductory note. Most are willing to pay more for a book if it also contains patterns they may wish to actually use. Sadly Amazon has yet to embrace this concept when giving previews for pattern books.

Reading customer reviews, I took a chance and purchased this book since I have an intarsia project I wish to do. I am very pleased with the patterns contained. (Pocket scarf, Felted Bag, Dog Sweater, Throw Pillows, baby sweater, Kitty hat and mittens (child), Vest and Crop Cardigan. Each is made with suggested intarsia images and images of the completed project is in the book. The most exciting thing is multiple intarsia charts are included in the back portion of the book, so you could change the design to something you prefer. It is easy to look at those charts and learn how to convert other images to intarsia charts.

I am excited to use this book. The patterns appear easy to follow.
Hidden Winter
Different types of knitting.
GoodLike
Great patterns and illustrations. This book is all about intarsia. Lots of great designs that you can use on any other patterns besides the ones in this book. There are beginner patterns as well as more complicated ones and great instructions on this method. One of my favorite patterns is the dog sweater with bones around the collar/neck.
Malodor
I found this book really helpful! I have never done intarsia before and thought the author did a really good job of explaining it and made it much more simple than I had previously thought:)
I also loved that she had numerous artists submit their designs for the book, so there is a nice array of all different projects to work on!
Enone
I did not care for this book at all. I just got it and at the discounted used book price, I'm ready to toss it in the goodwill bin. There are a few charts in there, but I'm not really interested in making a "Lenin" face on anything. Yup Lenin from Russia....or the Union Jack, or a skull head scarf. Dismissed :-(
Bearus
This book is ok. I was actually disappointed w/ it. It doesn't give any new info, and it's patterns are pretty cheesy. All in all it was a waste of money.
An adequate basic introduction to intarsia, but not very thorough. I found the tone condescending at many points, and the author seems ignorant about techniques other than intarsia.

I've tried a bit of intarsia before, and read a few tutorials and a few overviews in general knitting books. Even so, I encountered very little in the way of new ideas and information. I even recognized several points that were glossed over or ignored entirely. For instance, the section on working intarsia in the round? It says this can't be done properly, and the reader can go search the web if s/he really wants to try. Gosh, how helpful. There's also no mention of color changes where twisting strands together isn't really required--which would have been an interesting thing to note.

My big complaint, though, is the condescending tone throughout the technique section. The author seems to think that the reader is foolishly terrified to try intarsia. Now, for any technique, there certainly are knitters who are nervous about trying it--and encouraging them is a good thing. But here, it sounds more like the author looks down on you if you're unsure of yourself.

This tone is at its worst in the section on stranded knitting. The author seems downright bigoted against stranded colorwork, and ignorant to boot. First, she uses "fair isle" to mean all stranded colorwork, when that is but one style of many. I probably wouldn't harp on that, since it's not uncommon to conflate the two--but terminology was just the tip of the iceberg. After the section heading and the explanation of how "fair isle" is done, the author goes on to snark about various perceived problems with stranded knitting. Some are matters of taste--floats making the wrong side look like a "mess". Some are matters of application--sure stranded fabric is thicker, but that's GOOD if you want a warmer item. Others are a matter of techniques that the author seems not to have bothered to investigate--you CAN use more than two colors in the same row, or go more than four stitches between color changes. . . . It's fine if you don't enjoy stranded knitting. And I hardly expect a book on intarsia to go into great detail about stranded knitting techniques. But there's no need to be so negative about other techniques as if it was a political race--and the complaints were dubious at best.