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by Ruth E. Finley

eBook Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them download ISBN: 0939009684
Author: Ruth E. Finley
Publisher: Epm Pubns Inc; 3rd ed. edition (October 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1380 kb
Fb2: 1937 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx txt lrf rtf
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Crafts and Hobbies

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Traces the history of patchwork in colonial America and offers instructions for using traditional quilting patterns for modern homes.

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Old Patchwork Quilts book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Old Patchwork Quilts: And the Women Who Made Them as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. First published in 1929, this book is an enduring contribution. Start by marking Old Patchwork Quilts: And the Women Who Made Them as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, Ruth E. Finley. Quilts: Their Story and How to Make Them, Marie D. Webster. The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America, Carrie A. Hall and Rose G. Kretsinger. 101 Patchwork Patterns, Ruby McKim. The New Quilting & Patchwork Dictionary, Rhoda Ochser Goldberg. 849 Traditional Patchwork Patterns, Susan Winter Mills.

The American Quilt : A History of Cloth and Comfort 1750-1950 By Roderick Kiracofe and Mary Elizabeth Johnson. Hidden in Plain View: A Secret Story of Quilts and the Underground Railroad By Jacqueline L. Tobin, Raymond G. Dobard and Cuestra Ray Benberry. Clarkson N. Potter, In. NY, NY: 1993. American Pieced Quilts By Jonathan Holstein. New York: Bantum Doubleday Dell Publishers, 1999. Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them By Ruth Finley. Charlottesville, VA: Howell Press, 1992. Perfect Patchwork Primer By Beth Gutcheon. New York: Viking Penguin, 1973.

It can be tough, being a medieval quilt historian. Consider what’s involved: Large quantities of books, many of them out of print, many of them insanely expensive, many of them with full-color. Sign the petition: Revoke the NRA’s tax-exempt status. The National Rifle Association (NRA) has long been hemorrhaging money.

Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, by Ruth Finley; Quilts, Their Story and How to Make Them . The unrestraint of the civilization that the colonists had left behind them had made its mark upon their character.

Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, by Ruth Finley; Quilts, Their Story and How to Make Them, by Marie D. Webster; Old Fashioned Quilts, by Carlie Sexton; The Thayer Museum of Art; The Kansas City Star; The Seattle Post-Intelligencer and Prudence Penny; Grandmother Clark’s Old Fashioned Quilt Designs; The MoKim Studios; The Woman’s Home Companion; The Ladies’.

Ruth Finley aslo noted it being called Triple X at the same time. Our block uses three colours, but it is more commonly coloured with two fabrics, his block has also gone by the names: Thrift Block, also in noted in Farm and Fireside, in 1884; Sugar Bowl Quilt in the Rural New Yorker in 1932; Garden Path Patch in the Cincinnati Enquirer in 1933; and, Sugar Bowl again in when Nancy Cabot featured it in.

Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them by Ruth E Finley 1970 Printing. Exciting quick-and-easy projects for quilting, patchwork, applique basics, heirloom and contemporary designs. Author : Ruth E.

Hearts and Gizzards, Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them. Springtime Blossoms, The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America, Page 74, No. 11. Also Lazy Daisy and Wheel of Fortune, The Standard Book of Quilt Making and Collecting. I've been doing this a long time, have some books you don't see everyday. Good luck finding a pattern for it, I draft my own. The names are attached to geometric patterns, like Carpenters Square and Windmill. 06-24-2011, 08:28 AM #8.

The second book to feature the classic crime-solving detective, Chief Inspector Wexford. It's impossible to forget the violent bludgeoning to death of an elderly lady in her home. SUMMARY: The bed was neatly made, and the woman on top neatly strangled. Perhaps it was the mystery woman who left her fingerprints on the Hathall's bathtub? Perhaps it was Angela's husband who lied about a stolen library book?

First published in 1929, this record of the most picturesque of all American folk arts is an enduring contribution to the study of women's history. The 200 photographs and diagrams of the original book are supplemented in this third edition by eight pages of color plates and an introduction by Barbara Brackman.
Comments: (7)
SkroN
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate. Only a soul in desperate need of nervous outlet could have conceived and executed, for instance, the "Full Blown Tulip"...It is a perfect accomplishment from a needlework standpoint, yet hideous" (she describes it in detail and goes on): "This green-red-lemon-orange combination is enough to set a blind man's teeth on edge..."
There are 100 figures (drawings and diagrams) of patterns, 90+ photos of antique quilts (black and white), and sections on sets, wadding, fabrics and dyes, etc. History has not been one of my favorite subjects, but I love this book. I have gone back to it again and again in the twenty years since that first reading, whether to find a pattern or to enjoy again her discussions. I have a rather extensive library on many subjects, and this book rates as one of my top ten favorites.
Nidora
I bought this book about 20 years ago. It was first published in 1929, but it reads as if it were written at the height of the feminist movement in the 70s! The author had a great sense of humor and a marvelous appreciation of how women needed, and found in quilting, an artistic/creative outlet, at a time when just about everything else in their world was controlled or created by men.
She traces the development of techniques and designs, from simple to complex, interweaving her discussion with descriptions of the social and environmental circumstances that influenced design and especially the naming of designs. For example, "It was impossible for the women who every morning viewed nature's most glorious spectacle not to create a 'Rising Sun' quilt pattern. How they loved the sunrise is best proved by the remarkable beauty of the pattern it inspired...It is a triumph of design and is so difficult of execution that only the most expert quilt-makers attempted it. A 'Rising Sun' was post-graduate work, and consequently is one of the rarest and most valuable of quilts."
Describing Pennsylvania Dutch quilts within the context of the drabness of the Pennsylvania Dutch woman's existence she says, "...it may have been some unconsciously craved compensation for the drab monotony of their days that caused the women of these households to evolve quilt patterns so intricate. Only a soul in desperate need of nervous outlet could have conceived and executed, for instance, the "Full Blown Tulip"...It is a perfect accomplishment from a needlework standpoint, yet hideous" (she describes it in detail and goes on): "This green-red-lemon-orange combination is enough to set a blind man's teeth on edge..."
She traces how pattern names often changed as the quilters' circumstances changed. For example, a pattern that has been known as the "Bear's Paw" (and sometimes as "Hand of Friendship") since the early 1800s in PA and Ohio was called "Duck's-foot-in-the-mud" in Long Island!
There are 100 figures (drawings and diagrams) of patterns, 90+ photos of antique quilts (black and white), and sections on sets, wadding, fabrics and dyes, etc. History has not been one of my favorite subjects, but I love this book. I have gone back to it again and again in the twenty years since that first reading, whether to find a pattern or to enjoy again her discussions. I have a rather extensive library on many subjects, and this book rates as one of my top ten favorites.
Akir
This book remains important in the history of quilt studies, as one of the first to examine American quilt history, but it is absolutely ridden with romantic myths and errors. Don't take anything she says as gospel. Her assertions, completely unfounded and undocumented, have been repeated endlessly in books on quilts of the Colonial Revival (30s-40s) and the quilt revival (70s-today), but it doesn't make them true. Be very, very cautious in quoting her or in assuming that anyone quoting her later on, knows what they are talking about.
caster
I have quilted for years and this book is so heartwarming and I will pass it down to my daughter in law