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eBook Natural Dyeing (Gaia Traditional Crafts) download

by Jackie Crook

eBook Natural Dyeing (Gaia Traditional Crafts) download ISBN: 1856752801
Author: Jackie Crook
Publisher: Gaia Books Ltd (September 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 112
ePub: 1876 kb
Fb2: 1462 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: txt lit rtf mobi
Category: Crafts and Home
Subcategory: Crafts and Hobbies

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. The author of this book is Jackie Crook, an experienced dyer who grows her own items to create dyes; she is also the Founder of Mid-Essex (UK) Guild of Weavers, Spinners, and Dyers.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. For thousands of years, natural dyes have been celebrated for their subtlety and diversity-and. The publisher is Lark Books. The array of colors in this book from nature’s bounty creates gorgeous color families for dyes that may never be replicated.

The book includes 30 projects broken down into dye groups, and each project includes a recipe and clear step-by-step techniques and photographs.

Natural dyes are dyes or colorants derived from plants, invertebrates, or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources-roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood-and other biological sources such as fungi and lichens. Archaeologists have found evidence of textile dyeing dating back to the Neolithic period. In China, dyeing with plants, barks and insects has been traced back more than 5,000 years. The essential process of dyeing changed little over time

Art Craft Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes Modern Use (Paperback)

Art Craft Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes Modern Use (Paperback). J. N. Liles (author). The book will appeal not only to beginning and veteran dyers but to students of restorations and reconstruction as well as to s, quilters, weavers, knitters, and other textile artists-interested in natural dyes for their beauty and historical authenticity. Publisher: University of Tennessee Press ISBN: 9780870496707 Number of pages: 254 Weight: 367 g Dimensions: 234 x 154 x 13 mm.

In The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing, J. Liles consolidates the lore of the older dyers with his own first-hand experience to produce both a history of natural dyes and a practical manual for using pre–synthetic era processes. Liles consolidates the lore of the older dyers with his own first-hand experience to produce both a history of natural dyes and a practical manual for using pre–synthetic era processes on all the natural fibers-cotton, linen, silk, and wool. Read full description. Art Craft Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes Modern Use by J. Liles (Paperback, 1990). Brand new: lowest price.

All of our quills and some of our other materials are dyed using handmade natural dyes from gathered materials. We make things out of leather, wool, canvas, furs, stone, bone, and wood. All of our adornments are done in beads quills and stitch work. All of our quills and some of our other materials are dyed using handmade natural dyes from gathered materials. Beaded Hat Bands Bead Loom Patterns Loom Beading Quilling Loom Bead Weaving Quilting Quilling Art Beading Patterns. AJ's Traditional Crafts. Longhunter Leather Working Quilling Quilting Quilling Art.

Amazing DIY crafts for Christmas!

Amazing DIY crafts for Christmas! - Продолжительность: 12:11 Innova Crafts Recommended for you. 12:11. How to do FLUID ABSTRACT PAINTING Using a ZIPLOCK BAG (and craft paint) - Продолжительность: 3:17 Amy Pearce Recommended for you. 3:17.

Crouse of Gaia Conceptions also opts for natural dyes because of their energetic properties. Many plants used for natural dyes have medicinal properties such as indigo's calming effect on the nervous system," she says. Crouse uses blends of organic cotton and hemp, dyed with interesting materials like indigo, sandalwood, and pomegranate, in her pieces that are handmade in North Carolina.

Comments: (7)
Mr_TrOlOlO
I have been spinning wool into yarn, and this book has been very helpful with information about dyeing the yarn by using natural things like onion skins, avocado peels and many other plant materials. I am very happy with this book and use it often as a good reference.
Uranneavo
Too much gorgeous photography, not enough substance.
Bodwyn
This is a delight to flip through but most practicle to use.
I have prepared several dye bathes and found their direction clear
and accurate in results.
Puchock
Can't wait to try some of them.
Shezokha
I’ve got to say it: This book has stunning, and well-staged photos of natural plant dyes used on: cotton, wool, silk, yarns and fabric. This is a feast for the eyes.

This 2007, soft-cover book has 112 semi-glossy pages, all of which have nice color photos of different natural dyeing agents.

The author of this book is Jackie Crook, an experienced dyer who grows her own items to create dyes; she is also the Founder of Mid-Essex (UK) Guild of Weavers, Spinners, and Dyers.

The publisher is Lark Books.

The array of colors in this book from nature’s bounty creates gorgeous color families for dyes that may never be replicated. Dyeing the swatch is an important part of the process of dyeing.

Look at the ‘Mordanted’ Wool thumbnails at the bottom right of every dye-agent page; the subtleties of metal additives show interesting monochromes that can be used to dye fibers.

After having read this book, I am prompted to use my spiralizer on: onions, red and green bell peppers, and sweet potatoes to see if any interesting dyes can be made. I would like to add cinnamon, tea, henna, chili peppers, turmeric, and crushed basil leaves to see what I end up with.

This book has 3 pre-Main sections: ‘Contents’, ‘Introduction’, How to Use This Book’.

The Main section, ‘How to Dye’ has some sub-sections (i.e. the characteristics, color families, and sources. Buy the book to see these and other details.)
a. ‘Roots’
b. ‘Woods and Barks’
c. ‘Flowers’
d. ‘Leaves and Stalks’
e. ‘Fruits an Vegetables’
f. ‘Special Colours’
g. ‘Optimizing Your Natural Dyes’
h. ‘Colour Chart’

This is an excellent book, which also has a Bibliography and an Index at the back of the book.
I would like to read more books by this author.
Zolorn
The photography in this book is stunning! Sadly, this is neither a good primer to dyeing techniques nor is it a great resource for experienced dyers because all of the "natural materials" used are extremely unusual plants and barks found in India and other exotic locales. This book does not provide the basics for people who are just starting out with dyeing using natural fibers and it does not provide any information about how to acquire these rare materials.

Is it possible to dye with oak leaves or banana peels? That's the kind of natural dyeing information that a novice dyer living in the American midwest needs. I suppose if I lived in a more exotic locale with greater access to botanical shops and markets, I might be able to use this book for something. As it is, I will admire the beautiful colors in the photographs and hope I might be able to mimic the colors with Jacquard dyes.
Walianirv
I bought this book more for the information about the cleaning, mordanting and dyeing processes described in the beginning of the book. And I must say the photography is brilliant. As for obtaining the dyes, I use dye extracts from Table Rock Llamas in Colorado. They offer over 30 colors, including the exotics shown in "Natural Dyeing" (they don't sell toxic mordants). But if I want to grow my own dye plants, I rely on "A Dyer's Garden" by Rita Buchanan, a fantastic little book that gives growing info, dye recipies and results, and a supplier's list to obtain plants and seeds. Finally, I will experiment if I want to see what color a particular plant might give -- I hear bindweed, a noxious weed where I live, gives brilliant greens . . .
It's true, this is a gorgeously photographed book, and the process info is fantastic, but there is no information of any kind for resources. I'm still googling around distinguishing sources for various mordants and plants and materials. Luckily there are stores online selling at least some if not most of the dyestuffs used here. I can't imagine why some of these stores weren't listed at the back of the book as is customary with craft publications. Hints for gathering the materials locally would have been useful as well. Yet still it's a good book.