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eBook The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook download

by Gloria Kaufer Greene

eBook The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook download ISBN: 0812929772
Author: Gloria Kaufer Greene
Publisher: Clarkson Potter; Revised edition (September 7, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 560
ePub: 1428 kb
Fb2: 1523 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx mbr lrf mobi
Category: Cooking
Subcategory: Special Diet

All three books deal in depth with Jewish holiday traditions, although Ms. Glazer and Ms. Greene seem to have better rabbinical . Gloria Kaufer Greene has really outdone herself with her New Jewish Holiday Cookbook

All three books deal in depth with Jewish holiday traditions, although Ms. Greene seem to have better rabbinical sources and seem to be more dedicated to the details of the traditions. Gloria Kaufer Greene has really outdone herself with her New Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Published on December 21, 1999.

The Jewish Holiday Cookbook is filled with 250 strikingly original recipes, many of them annotated . Most important, the book is arranged according to the way people will use it, by holiday: Shabbat, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Shemini Atzeret and Sim-.

The Jewish Holiday Cookbook is filled with 250 strikingly original recipes, many of them annotated with fascinating stories about the customs and cultures from which they derive. Chicken soup and gefilte fish, brisket and potato pancakes are here - what Jewish cookbook would be complete without them? - but The Jewish Holiday Cookbook goes far beyond the expected, presenting exciting, authentic recipes from the many varied traditions of Jewish cuisine all over the world.

Jewish Holiday Cookbook book.

Greene, Gloria Kaufer, 1950-. Jewish cooking, Fasts and feasts. New York : Times Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook by Gloria .

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Gloria Kaufer Greene's books. Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Gloria Kaufer Greene’s Followers. None yet. Gloria Kaufer Greene. Gloria Kaufer Greene’s books. Jewish festival cookbook: an international collection of recipes and customs.

Gloria Kaufer Greene has really outdone herself with her New Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Not only do I love the kosher recipes, but I love the way Ms. Greene explains the significance of the particular food to each holiday

Gloria Kaufer Greene has really outdone herself with her New Jewish Holiday Cookbook. Greene explains the significance of the particular food to each holiday.

The Jewish Holiday Cookbook is filled with 250 strikingly original recipes, many of them annotated with fascinating stories about the customs and cultures from which they derive

The Jewish Holiday Cookbook is filled with 250 strikingly original recipes, many of them annotated with fascinating stories about the customs and cultures from which they derive. Chicken soup and gefilte fish, brisket and potato pancakes are here - what Jewish cookbook would be complete without them? - but The Jewish Holiday Cookbook goes far beyond the expected, presenting exciting, authentic recipes from the many varied traditions of Jewish cuisine all over the world

Author of Don't Tell 'Em It's Good for 'Em, The new Jewish holiday cookbook, The Jewish festival cookbook, Eat your vegetables!, The .

Author of Don't Tell 'Em It's Good for 'Em, The new Jewish holiday cookbook, The Jewish festival cookbook, Eat your vegetables!, The Jewish holiday cookbook. Created April 1, 2008.

In this second edition of her popular classic, celebrated food editor Gloria Kaufer Greene masterfully combines the delicious foods, the rich traditions, and the interesting histories that are essential components of every Jewish holiday in one cookbook. Readers will learn not only how to make a delicious Passover Seder, but why each dish is prepared for this annual celebration, and where these recipes originated. The 260-plus recipes vary from classic Jewish favorites to brand new discoveries with international flair. The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook is a wonderful resource for chefs, whether they are preparing their very first Hanukkah feast or putting the finishing touches on the weekly Sabbath dinner.
Comments: (7)
Vojar
I don't buy a lot of recipe books -- but when I saw a friend at the grocery store pull out her copy of this book, I had to ask why she brought a cookbook shopping with her. She said she loved this book, made a lot of its recipes around every holiday, and it was just easier than making a list. AND that she loved this book so much that when she accidentally left her first copy in the produce section, never to be seen again, she almost immediately bought another copy. Such an endorsement... and I need every kitchen inspiration I can get (as a not-enthusiatic cook). Every recipe is useful and a keeper -- and most are good anytime of the year. Cous-cous aux sept legumes is a family favorite (without the lamb -- we've even made a vegetarian version). Finally, it is a recipe book for everyone, despite the "Jewish" part of the title.
Iraraeal
excellent explanations of the jewish holidays and jewish culure through food. this book has some great recipes. they are affordable, innovative and useful for everyday cooking too.
Adrierdin
This is an excellent cookbook but hardly any picture. Is out of print.
Kearanny
great cookbook, I really enjoy it!
Nakora
Very happy with my purchase
Jwalextell
It has the recipe for Mitzapawny soup.
Monam
The way I judge a cookbook like this is to find a couple of recipes for foods I make well and see what the author's versions are like.
If they align with mine, then I assume I can trust the unfamiliar recipes.
This book passes the "How does she make stuffed grape leaves?" test...and many others.
Gloria Kaufer Greene is a certified culinary maven.
`The New Jewish Holiday Cookbook' by Gloria Kauler Greene and `The Essential Book of Jewish Festival Cooking' by Phyllis Glazer and Miryam Glazer are two leading representatives of a great cookbook subgenre which may be unique among all cookbook flavors in that they represent that extraordinary relation between Judaism and food. Like the exceptional `Jewish Holiday Cookbook' by Joan Nathan and unlike the encyclopedic `New York Times Cookbook of Jewish Recipes', both books spend much space and words on the practice of kashrut or keeping kosher. But this is not the whole story. There are numerous Jewish culinary traditions which are not directly related to kashrut, such as the traditions surrounding the number of challah loaves baked for the Shabbat or the number of bumps on the challah loaves (The magic number here is 12, representing the 12 tribes of Israel, so the tradition is to have 12 loaves. More practical is the tradition to have two loaves each with 6 bumps created by the braiding of the bread before baking.)

There is one major difference among these three books which is evident in their titles. Ms. Glazer's book deals with `festival' cooking while Nathan and Greene deal with `Holiday' cooking. The subtle difference here is that the festival book does not cover Shabbat and the two `holiday' books do.

To a non-Jew, my guess is that since there are 52 shabbats in a year, while there are at most seven or eight major `festivals', it is much more important to have a book covering Shabbat as well as the yearly holidays. Between Greene and the Glazers, I find at least one other big difference in that Ms. Greene gives far more coverage to the creation of challah, which may be the single most important Jewish holiday recipe in any of these books, as it seems to be the one food which tradition calls for at every Shabbat. In fact, even though Joan Nathan's book combines two books, one of which is on Jewish holiday baking, Ms. Greene's treatment of challah, at least in the details she give for braiding several different numbers of dough strands is the most extensive. Among the recipes from the three books, the amateur bread baker in me prefers Ms. Nathan's recipe, as it uses the least (1 packet) yeast and calls for the longest raising time. She (and Ms. Greene) also use my preferred `active dry yeast' rather than the `rapid rise' yeast.

All three books deal in depth with Jewish holiday traditions, although Ms. Glazer and Ms. Greene seem to have better rabbinical sources and seem to be more dedicated to the details of the traditions. Of the three, Ms. Greene seems to touch me more effectively in her discussion of these traditions than the other two.

All three writers are primarily from the Ashkenazy tradition, although all three also give fair treatment to Sephardic dishes and menus. If you are really interested in Sephardic menus primarily, Ms. Nathan spends much of her space on Sephardic menus.

If you are willing to take a recommendation from a goyem, I recommend Ms. Greene's book most highly, followed by Ms. Nathan's book for her many baking recipes; however, all three are quality books.