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by Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz

eBook The Book of Latin American Cooking (Cookery Library) download ISBN: 0140469222
Author: Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New Ed edition (October 31, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1169 kb
Fb2: 1371 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit lrf rtf lrf
Category: Cooking
Subcategory: Regional and International

Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz explores all of the cooking of South America from Peru to. .

Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz explores all of the cooking of South America from Peru to Chile. French Tastemaker Award, The Book of Latin American Cooking is an exotic, exciting and uncomplicated cookbook that comes complete with an introduction and notes on ingredients. This is Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz's second book to be re-issued by Grub Street following the success of The New Complete Book of Mexican Cooking. Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz has written numerous cookery books and as a culinary anthropologist and food historian is now one of this country's most highly regarded food writers.

Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz was one of the leading cookbook authors of her generation and wrote numerous cookery books including The New Complete Book of Mexican Cooking and The Complete Book of Caribbean Cooking. She was a culinary anthropologist and food historian, principal consultant for the Time Life Foods of the World series, as well as a regular contributor to Gourmet magazine.

Culinary anthropologist and food historian Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz skillfully adapts everyday ingredients to the subtle marriages of texture and flavor, which distinguish Latin American cuisine. Featuring recipes from Argentina, Ecuador, Brazil, and beyond, the astonishing range and inventiveness of Latin American cuisine is here in one book for cooks of all levels. Lifestyle & Sports Food. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

A must for lovers of Latin American cooking.

by Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz. This cookbook encompasses the world of Latin American cooking. A must for lovers of Latin American cooking. Published by Thriftbooks. It is packed with authentic and trustworthy recipes as well as a generous amount of essential information and would be an excellent addition to any cookbook collection.

Elisabeth Ortiz is the first to introduce to Americans the entire range of this splendid cuisine, selecting out the vast territory . Never before has there been a cookbook that encompasses the whole world of Latin American cooking.

Elisabeth Ortiz is the first to introduce to Americans the entire range of this splendid cuisine, selecting out the vast territory that stretches from Mexico to Chile the mast exciting foods of each region. Elisabeth Ortiz is the first to introduce to Americans the entire range of this splendid cuisine, selecting out the vast territory that stretches from Mexico to Chile the mast exciting foods of each region.

Start by marking The Book Of Latin American Cooking (Cookery Library) as Want to Read . See a Problem? We’d love your help.

Start by marking The Book Of Latin American Cooking (Cookery Library) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz. She was principal consultant for the Time Life Foods of the World series, as well as a regular contributor to Gourmet magazine.

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Ortiz, Elisabeth Lambert. Cookery, Latin American.

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Comments: (7)
Vetibert
I am very pleased to have bought through your Company "The Book of Latin American Cooking".
I had a most enjoyed and cherished very little culinary trip through Latin America (America Latina). I made Striped Bass with Vegetables (Corvina a la Chorrillana) -a very nice dish from my country of origin, Peru (Peru), which name I vaguely remembered but had never eaten before-; Lentils (Lentejas), the way they are made in Colombia (Colombia) -very nice-; Meatballs (Albondigas), as they make them in Uruguay (Uruguay) -delicious-; Chicken with Rice (Arroz con Pollo) and Beef in Tomato and Pepper Sauce (Carne en Jocon), dishes from the Dominican Republic (Republica Dominicana) and Guatemala (Guatemala), respectively, -both very nice dishes-.
I intend, of course, trying to cook other dishes -from those, as well as from other Latin American countries- given in this Recipe Book, as I don't wish to remain oblivious of all this array of flavours.

Thank you very much
Delan
I got this book hoping for some real breadth and depth.

One of the first things I wanted to know about was humitas, which are prepared, with many variations, throughout Andean S.A. and also some areas non-andean. They are basically corn husks wrapped and tied around a filling, then boiled or steamed. The biggest regional variation is in the filling, with some dramatic differences from culture to culture.

No mention of humitas in the index. So, I thought maybe if I look under some regional entries, they might be there as a sub-entry. Nope. To contrast, in this same order, I bought Argentina Cooks!: Treasured Recipes from the Nine Regions of Argentina (Hippocrene Cookbook Library), which had two humitas recipes. Now, humitas are a popular Criolo dish in the Northern Andean regions of Argentina, but humitas are not as big a deal in Argentina as they are in Chile, Peru or Ecuador. So, to find two recipes in an Argentine cookbook and NONE in a pan-Latin American cookbook kinda says something about the Latin American one.

Okay, well Some people say that humitas are really just a big, elaborate tamale which is boiled instead of baked or fried. So I looked up "tamale". NO ENTRY FOR TAMALE?!?!?!? AT ALL ?!?!?!

Third lookup: no mention of quinoa at all. Anywhere in the book!

Three strikes.

So there was another thing on my mind, Acarajé, which is a Brazillian dish common in the Bahia region, which is kind of like a Brazilian falafel, made from black-eyed peas and shrimp. I did find that, in a rudimentary version. But reading the discussion, she strongly recommends that one try to find the powdered pre-mix in a Latin American grocery store. Now, that kind of attitude is just completely perpendicular to my approach to cooking, and really not the philosophy of people who buy cookbooks in general. Mentioning that there is such a thing to be had sometimes, maybe, but recommending it as the preferred route? Does a cookbook for baking cakes steer you to the Betty Crocker section of the grocery store for a boxed cake mix?

This book has a lot of recipes(part of why I bought it), and I'm sure that I'll get some use out of it eventually, but it's not what I was looking for. What I would have liked best would have been a Latin American equivalent of Claudia Roden's book The New Book of Middle Eastern Food, which has lots of breadth and depth, all the common regional recipes in their canonical forms with discussion of variations. This book is not that. If someone is familiar with Roden's book, and knows of a comparable Latin-American cookbook, please recommend it in a comment to this review.

In summation: a book with this kind of title should at least cover all of the regional basics, this book does not come close to doing that.
zzzachibis
Since my father was Colombian and my mother born in America, I enjoyed delicious Colombian cuisine when we visited his family--arepas, sancocho, empanadas, etc--but never learned how to cook this type of food at home. Luckily for me, Elisabeth Ortiz has compiled this wonderful book!

She begins the book with a comprehensive list of common ingredients of South American cuisine, including a description of the ingredient and where one might find it. She then continues the book with the usual categories of Meats, Vegetables, Sauces, etc. She includes background and information about the food for each of her recipes. For example, she might describe when and where the meal might be served, or some helpful tips about a particular ingredient.

I have made several recipes from this book, and they've all turned out beautifully. The instructions are detailed and easy to follow, even for someone who, like me, has little experience in the particular cuisine. More importantly, though, everything is delicious!

I especially like to use the recipes in this book for special occasions. For example, my favorite dish, Pabellon Caraqueno (Steak with rice, black beans, a plantains--the national dish of Venezuela), while simple, takes several hours to prepare. However, I guarantee that, after you've arranged this meal on a platter and set it down in front of your guests, you will be rewarded with some 'Ooohs' and 'Aahhs' and many satisfied taste buds.
Dibei
This is my second book from Ortiz. Her recipes are easy to make and delicious. For those who want to enjoy Authenic Latin dishes, you can't go wrong with this little gem.
Welahza
interesting recipes
Gaeuney
Lots of wonderful authentic latin recipies. They have all been very intersting and delightful so far. Some of the dishes can be a little complicated to prepare though.
Gugrel
Very happy thank you.
excellent