carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Renewing America's Food Traditions: Saving and Savoring the Continent's Most Endangered Foods

eBook Renewing America's Food Traditions: Saving and Savoring the Continent's Most Endangered Foods download

by Gary Paul Nabhan,Deborah Madison

eBook Renewing America's Food Traditions: Saving and Savoring the Continent's Most Endangered Foods download ISBN: 1933392894
Author: Gary Paul Nabhan,Deborah Madison
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing (May 15, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 350
ePub: 1786 kb
Fb2: 1223 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf doc txt docx
Category: Cooking
Subcategory: Cooking Education and Reference

Renewing America's Food Traditions is a beautifully illustrated dramatic call to recognize, celebrate.

Renewing America's Food Traditions is a beautifully illustrated dramatic call to recognize, celebrate. He notes what is at stake: much of American cuisine today is close to tasteless. Think tomatoes, for example. Mass produced, bland redness of tomatoes, for instance. Nabhan notes what has happened over time. A century ago, Americans used 15,000 different varieties of apple; today, we only have 1500 varieties. We are impoverishing the supply of food sources, with convenience replacing taste and texture.

Renewing America's Food Traditions book. Implementing that call to action, the Renewing America's Food Tradition collaborative involves some of the country's most inspiring and effective non-profit organizations in targeting hundreds of rare and neglected foods unique to North America for such restoration and recovery.

Renewing America's Food Traditions is a beautifully illustrated dramatic call to recognize, celebrate, and conserve the .

Renewing America's Food Traditions is a beautifully illustrated dramatic call to recognize, celebrate, and conserve the great diversity of foods that gives North America its distinctive culinary identity that reflects our multicultural heritage. In addition, this book offers the first-ever list of foods at risk in America (more than a thousand), shows how all of us can personally support and participate in such recoveries, and lists food festivals held across the continent to honor. It offers us rich natural and cultural histories as well as recipes and folk traditions associated with the rarest food plants and animals in North America.

This book is more a historical book of endemic North American foods than a cookbook. Some recipes are more conventional, others more eclectic. Under no circumstance does Nabhan encourage anyone to eat any species, plant or animal, that is at risk or endangered, and several recipes are included more for historical purposes than under an expectation that the reader would attempt to make them. In fact, it is not unfair to say that this book is more a cultural and historical book of endemic North American foods than an actual cookbook.

Renewing America's Food Traditions: Saving and Savoring the Continent's Most Endangered Foods. Renewing the Food Traditions of Chile Pepper Nation Tucson: Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Press. White River Junction: Chelsea Green Publishing. Five Ways to Value Western Landscapes. Renewing the Food Traditions of Salmon Nation. Why Some Like It Hot: Food, Genes and Cultural Diversity.

Source: Renewing America's Food Traditions: Saving and Savoring the Continent's Most Endangered Foods. Pacific Coast aka Acorn Foodshed.

Food Traditions Saving and Savoring the Continent’s Most Endangered Foods. FOREWORD by. Deborah Madison Marshall Strawberry the history of Bainbridge Island and also serve as a fund-raiser for the small museum

Mr. Nabhan’s book is part of a larger effort to bring foods back from the brink by engaging nursery owners, farmers, breeders and chefs to grow and use them.

Mr. Continue reading the main story.

Renewing America's Food Traditions is a beautifully illustrated dramatic call to recognize, celebrate, and conserve the great diversity of foods that gives North America its distinctive culinary identity that reflects our multicultural heritage. It offers us rich natural and cultural histories as well as recipes and folk traditions associated with the rarest food plants and animals in North America. In doing so, it reminds us that what we choose to eat can either conserve or deplete the cornucopia of our continent.While offering a eulogy to a once-common game food that has gone extinct--the passenger pigeon--the book doesn't dwell on tragic losses. Instead, it highlights the success stories of food recovery, habitat restoration, and market revitalization that chefs, farmers, ranchers, fishermen, and foresters have recently achieved. Through such "food parables," editor Gary Paul Nabhan and his colleagues build a persuasive argument for eater-based conservation.In addition, this book offers the first-ever list of foods at risk in America (more than a thousand), shows how all of us can personally support and participate in such recoveries, and lists food festivals held across the continent to honor and enjoy some of the country's most iconic foods, from crab cakes to maple syrup and filé gumbo. Organized by "food nations" named for the ecological and cultural keystone foods of each region--Salmon Nation, Bison Nation, Chile Pepper Nation, among others--this book offers an altogether fresh perspective on the culinary traditions of North America.
Comments: (7)
Ffan
The book's key focus is summarized on page xi, from a Foreword penned by Deborah Madison: "The Renewing America's Food Traditions (RAFT) collaborative. . .suggests a different scenario, one in which foods that are old might well be new again; these unfamiliar products from our country's regional food traditions can be every bit as compelling as the exotic foods we import from afar." The Introduction laments the disappearance of food traditions--and with them, food sources, some of which have become extinct, others of which have become endangered.

Gary Nabhan, the volume's editor, argues that by renewing these traditions, we might be able to revise endangered or threatened species. He notes what is at stake: much of American cuisine today is close to tasteless. Think tomatoes, for example. Mass produced, bland redness of tomatoes, for instance. Nabhan notes what has happened over time. A century ago, Americans used 15,000 different varieties of apple; today, we only have 1500 varieties. We are impoverishing the supply of food sources, with convenience replacing taste and texture. The book even lays out a "mission statement" of what we should strive for (Page 13).

The organizing structure of the book is the various "food nations," regions of the country with distinct food preferences and cultures. For example, Maple Syrup Nation includes parts of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont to Indiana and Ohio. Clambake Nation runs along the coastal region from Maine to New Jersey and Delaware. As an Illinoisan, I'm interested in Cornbread Nation. Then, Bison Nation, from the Dakotas and Montana to Texas. You get the point.

But, to me, one of the most interesting parts of the book, after understanding its philosophy, is the set of recipes that typify each region. In Bison Nation, there is a recipe entitled Crow Bison Cattail Stew, featuring bison meat, water, cattail stalks (how exotic can you get!), prairie turnips, cornmeal, juniper berries, salt, and pepper. Takes some preparation, but sounds tasty (I've had bison meat, and it is pretty good, if you cook it right and don't overcook it). An accompaniment perhaps? Bison Nation Hominy and Bean Chowder; Baked Sibley Squash. From Cornbread Nation: Smoked and Braised Mulefoot Hog Shoulder with Sweet Peppers, Prosciutto, and Lacinato Kale. Some of these products are hard to get! A basic point with this recipe--mulefoot hogs, apparently, are a lot tastier to eat than the current mass produced version that stocks grocery stores. And that's a thesis of the book. The quality of our food is degraded as more tasty food sources are crowded out by more commercially efficient (but tasteless) replacements. Is the charge accurate? I don't know, but the challenge for me is to locate some mulefoot hog and see.

One nice thing about the book: it provides hints to help you track down some of the food sources (some are so rare that one cannot use them to cook at this time).

Anyhow, an interesting book, looking at what we have lost from our food heritage and how we might recover some of that. The book gets you to thinking and provides some neat recipes--although you are unlikely to be able to make them unless you track down the ingredients!
Velellan
pictures are wonderful to see these heirloom items, plus descriptions of how they are unique. makes a dramatic constrast to our factory farm food. each description is how the item was introduced, used, and where its niche was in pre-industrialized America. it is interesting to see these foods organized by ecological areas. it is written for general audiences and anyone curious about old fashioned foods.
Burgas
Wonderful !
Dainris
Excellent book, very well written & lots of great American history about native food supplies and regional cultures. Really an excellent book!!!
Saintrius
This book inspired me to grow more in my garden and stick with foods native to my area
Mojar
This book is not just about food, it is about something deeply intrinsic to America - our food regions. As I read the book, I thought it strange that the author divides America in to the same regions that are predicted by Russia to result in any civil war break up of America. I could also see such strong, strong differences along the lines! Could it be, I thought, that "Cornbread nation" just does not completely get where "Maple Nation?" is coming from?

I really enjoyed the section on the American Chestnuts. So sad what happened to those majestic trees. It made me just want to go plant one.

I appreciated the information about how file powder is made from Sassafras - I have a sassafras tree and have been BUYING my powder. No more, now I can make my own!

I think survivalists would enjoy this book as well. It is not often one sees SQUIRREL recipes anymore. The pictures also, they are awesome.
Hellstaff
This book is attractive, but otherwise just plain silly and somehow very irritating. To begin with, the Forward and Introduction are so poorly worded, it's almost impossible to make sense of them. Secondly, the featured foods are in many cases not endangered at all - except as food items since no one wants to eat them. And, thirdly, the recipes are ridiculous, unsavory, and pointless since we shouldn't be eating endangered stuff anyway.

One contention is that if these foods are eaten, their increased popularity will ensure their survival. That may be true of the farmed foods, but it isn't true of the wild foods.

To be fair, I checked, and the New York Times had nothing to bad to say about the book. However, I hated it. If you just want to read about foods eaten in the past, or you enjoy food trivia, you might find it fun. However, if you take the book seriously as a blueprint for saving worthwhile foods, you won't like it.