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eBook Fish- The Basics: An Illustrated Guide to Selecting, Storing, and Preparing All Kinds of Fresh Seafood download

by Shirley King

eBook Fish- The Basics: An Illustrated Guide to Selecting, Storing, and Preparing All Kinds of Fresh Seafood download ISBN: 0671650521
Author: Shirley King
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (August 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1682 kb
Fb2: 1950 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf txt lit docx
Category: Cooking
Subcategory: Cooking by Ingredient

383 pages : 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references (page 372) and index

383 pages : 27 cm. Includes bibliographical references (page 372) and index. Open-fire and indoor grilling - Frying and sautéing, including the blackening method - Deep-frying - Poaching - Steaming - Braising - Soups and stews - Smoking - Microwave seafood cookery.

also includes illustrated profiles of more than 100 varieties of seafood.

Hailed by Gourmet magazine as the best introductory fish cookbook. Hailed by Gourmet magazine as "the best introductory fish cookbook. peerlessly though out," Shiley King's Fish: The Basics contains more than 100 recipes, organized by cooking technique, each one showing all the possible varieties of fish that can be substituted for one another; also includes illustrated profiles of more than 100 varieties of seafood.

com's Shirley King Page and shop for all Shirley King books. Fish- The Basics: An Illustrated Guide to Selecting, Storing, and Preparing All Kinds of Fresh Seafood. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Shirley King.

Shirley King wrote Fish: The Basics in 1990. King still divides the book into three parts. The final section, "Profiles," describes all varieties of seafood in detail, including 23 kinds of sole and flounder, gooseneck barnacles, and skate.

Shirley King, Glenn Wolff. Fish:The Basics has received praise from all quarters for its breadth, clarity, and for the flexibility it gives the seafood cook. The second part of the book contains more than 200 illustrated profiles of fish and shellfish, including many of the lesser-known varieties that are increasingly common in the marketplace, with a list of recipes that are appropriate for each one.

Find nearly any book by Shirley King. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Shirley King. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Fish : The Basics: An Illustrated Guide to Selecting and Cooking Fresh Seafood. I have a number of seafood cookbooks in my personal collection, but there are several things I really like about this book

Fish : The Basics: An Illustrated Guide to Selecting and Cooking Fresh Seafood. Select Format: Hardcover. I have a number of seafood cookbooks in my personal collection, but there are several things I really like about this book.

You can target Lake Trout, Northern Pike, Walleye, or Sauger all from the very same hole. We’ve summed all of this up for you in a picture so you can easily prepare for your next ice fishing trip.

Fresh seafood? Check. But rather than turn us loose in the bay to fend for ourselves, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife sent over Shellfish Project Leader Mitch Vance to turn our group of city slickers into clam-finding machines. For the kinds of clams we were after-big, siphon-dangling gapers (similar in appearance to geoducks), butters (aka Martha Washingtons and Quahogs), littlenecks, and delicate little purple varnishes, we used a combination of rakes, shovels, cylindrical air-powdered tubes, and our good old-fashioned bare hands. The latter ultimately proved more satisfying in a primal, hunter-gatherer kind of way, nevermind the waders.

Offers advice on buying, storing, and preparing fish, explores a full range of cooking techniques, and gives recipes for tangy marinades, savory stews, and a variety of fish dishes
Comments: (7)
Iaran
I needed this book because I go to the fish market often and have no idea
what I am looking at beyond the usual fish. I recommend this because there are many names for the same fish. The markets make up names for fish that
are common names, and have nothing to do with the species of type of fish. The result is that you can buy something and not realize what it is, and pay more than you need to pay. It is very helpful to know how a flat fish, for example, is best cooked, and know what they are called. You would never guess it in the market. Learning this has made me much more confident and a much smarter consumer. You also learn about the fat content, and flavors best used with each type of fish. I recommend it highly.
Wymefw
I appreciate the previous reviews that there are other excellent cookbooks available, but this is a GEM.
If you live by the sea, as I do, and often have guests bring different fish to ‘try’, this is invaluable! Havin a daughter bring home fresh Octopus, and looking at a shelf of cookbooks to no avail of any octopus recipes, found an excellent recipe in this book.
A keeper, even if you have other Fish books or hate octopus!
Onoxyleili
I've had this book for many years in the hard-cover edition, and although it is useful on many levels, the recipes are hard to get at in the usual way. I highly recommend starting at the back of this book and using the index. Some of the best recipes have the least inspiring names: "Baked Fatty Fish Fillets" is versatile and delicious, but who looks at a piece of salmon and thinks "gee, what should I do with this fatty fish fillet?" Still, the information is useful and the recipes work, which is enough to keep it in my cookbook collection even as others have been downsized.
Mautaxe
I have used this book for several years, having purchased it in 1992, and I have always found it annoying to find the kind of recipe I was looking for. The book is laid out by more by method and type of fish than by fish species, and this is not how the casual cook thinks of looking for recipes. After struggling with it for 10 years, I found several superior fish cookbooks by some really stellar talents, including no less than James Beard and Alan Davidson, plus Mark Bittman and James Peterson. All of these books are worthy. Beard's book in particular, is well suited to the occasional cook. Recipes are clear, simple, and economical with ingredients.
Windbearer
I bought this so I could have a really thorough book when it came to cooking any fish. Well, this book has every fish imaginable but when you attempt to look up a specific fish and how long to cook it you get a range of fish of that particular species. Also, the cooking time is a range: Example: Chilean Sea Bass is listed under white bass with cook time of 5 minutes to 25 minutes (???). Okay, and then, how about this: For cook time, it refers you to two seperate page numbers but then you only get the vague cooking instructions because it is for a wide range of fish types. I finally got frustrated and found the answer on the internet. Save your money on this book.
BroWelm
On retirement to BC and facing a wonderful selection of fish for our table, I have found this book to be the best source of information on cooking and preparing fresh seafood I have ever used in 45 years plus of cooking. I like the "principles" approach; it leaves me free to adapt and adjust according to our preferences. Yet the book has given me some great new ideas which we have welcomed and enjoyed. l
Ubranzac
I don't go shopping for fish without this book.
In Seattle, there's an abundance of Asian markets, carrying an assortment of fish that most Westerners without a big fish-cooking or Asian background will recognize. This book includes a lot of the seafood that I have debated over but feel more confident experimenting with due to its guidance.

There are sections even explaining what the different types of canned crabmeat mean. YES.

I take it with me everywhere, eating, drinking, and yes, in traffic.

<3

*joy