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eBook Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol. 6 download

by George Perez,Various,Gerry Conway

eBook Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol. 6 download ISBN: 140123822X
Author: George Perez,Various,Gerry Conway
Publisher: DC Comics (June 11, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1167 kb
Fb2: 1678 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf mbr azw lit
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Gerry Conway is a prolific comics writer whose long career includes co-creating The Punisher, for Marvel Comics . Let me say that I am not a fan of Gerry Conway's skills as a writer. These stories seemed awesome when I was 11 and 12 but as an adult they are definitely lacking.

Gerry Conway is a prolific comics writer whose long career includes co-creating The Punisher, for Marvel Comics, and Firestorm, for DC. In the 1970s he wrote long runs on Amazing Spider-Man and The Fantastic Four before moving to DC, where he wrote Justice League of America, Wonder Woman and many others. His use of expository dialogue is ridiculously excessive.

Justice League of America Justice League of America Justice League of America Justice League of America All-Star Squadron Justice League of America All-Star Squadron #15.

Justice League of America Justice League of America Justice League of America Justice League of America All-Star Squadron Justice League of America All-Star Squadron Justice League of America George Pérez/Cover Artist. Mike DeCarlo/Cover Artist.

Start by marking Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol. 6 as Want to Read . The ASS issues were drawn by Adrian Gonzalez with some great Joe Kubert covers

Start by marking Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol. 6 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The ASS issues were drawn by Adrian Gonzalez with some great Joe Kubert covers. Gerry Conway wrote for the JLA and Roy Thomas was the writer on the ASS. Shortly after this team-up, the JLA went belly up and devolved into the deservedly maligned JLA Detroit, which destroyed the JLA as a unique concept and the annual JLA/JSA team-ups. This series has been a lot of fun to read, but it's too bad DC, when faced with poor sales on the JLA book, didn't get rid of Gerry Conway and try a new writer.

Art by: George Pérez, Various, Don Heck. Cover by: Mike DeCarlo, George Pérez. Written by: Roy Thomas, Gerry Conway. Crisis on multiple earths 2002.

These classic tales are collected here in CRISIS ON MULTIPLE EARTHS VOL. 6. Includes JUSTICE LEAGUE . In the third epic in this book, the teams take on the Crime Champions of Earth-1. Includes JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA and ALL-STAR SQUADRON. These classic tales are collected here in CRISIS ON MULTIPLE EARTHS VOL. Includes JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA and ALL-STAR SQUADRON

Gerry Conway is a prolific comics writer whose long career includes co-creating The Punisher, for Marvel Comics .

George Pérez artist, cover. Crisis on Earth Prime is the first JLA comic I ever bought, and it's the story that led me to becoming a hardcore DC Comics fan. Even Don Heck's artwork looks cool here. And Jerry Ordway's work on Part 2 and 4 never looked so good. If only the All Star Squadron could get their own color trade, but we can dream. That being said, the quality control on this book is horrible. All Star Squadron 14 is reprinted too far down the page. Crisis On Multiple Earths.

The JLA meet the JSA in this new collection in which the teams face Gorilla Grodd and the Secret Society of Super-Villains and battle the. Crime Syndicate and the the Crime Champions of Earth-1. Collects JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA 207-209 and 219-220.

Gerard Francis Conway (born September 10, 1952) is an American writer of comic books and television shows

Gerard Francis Conway (born September 10, 1952) is an American writer of comic books and television shows. He is known for co-creating the Marvel Comics vigilante antihero the Punisher and scripting the death of the character Gwen Stacy during his long run on The Amazing Spider-Man. At DC Comics, he is known for co-creating the superhero Firestorm and others, and for writing the Justice League of America for eight years

Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol. 6 Conway, Gerry; Perez, George and Various. Crisis On Multiple Earths TP Vol 04, Various, Bates, Cary, Good Book.

Crisis on Multiple Earths Vol.

The Justice League of America teams up with their heroic predecesors, The Justice Society of America, in this new collection featuring three adventures that have never been reprinted before. First, the two teams face the threat of Gorilla Grodd and the Secret Society of Super-Villains. Then, the JLA and JSA battle alongside the All-Star Squadron against the Crime Syndicate. In the third epic in this book, the teams take on the Crime Champions of Earth-1.Collects JUSTICE LEAGUE OF AMERICA #195-197 & #207-209 and ALL-STAR SQUADRON #14-15.
Comments: (7)
The Rollers of Vildar
This review does contain spoilers so be warned

I was 11 years old when JLA 195 was published and this storyline probably had as big an impact on me as any comic I ever read. It wasn't the greatest story I ever read (by far) but it was the right story at the right time for me and I remember devouring this one during the seven hour drive to my grandparents' house in New York. I'd already been introduced to the heroes and villains of Earth 2 in JLA #193 and this storyline included even more cool characters including The Rag Doll, The Psycho Pirate and of course The Ultra-Humanite.

Let me say that I am not a fan of Gerry Conway's skills as a writer. These stories seemed awesome when I was 11 and 12 but as an adult they are definitely lacking. His use of expository dialogue is ridiculously excessive. Exposition is dialogue spoken by a character intended to convey information to the reader that they wouldn't otherwise know. Done properly exposition can be weaved in and feel like perfectly natural speech. In the case of Conway the exposition feels clunky, awkward and often superfluous. The Mist, for instance, mentions THREE times that repeated use of his invisio-solution has made him intangible. My favorite is this gem from Signalman, "Signalman reporting to Ultra-Humanite at the Sinister Citadel, via trans-earth radio! Mission--Accomplished!" The reader already knows that Ultra-Humanite is at the Sinister Citadel and why on Earth would Signalman mention his means of communication when Ultra-Humanite would undoubtedly know and the reader wouldn't care. Characters also seem to have no inner monologue and constantly speak their thoughts for other characters to overhear.

The Ultra Humanite story arc was fun but took a really dumb turn near the end. Four Earth 1 villains and Six from Earth 2 capture 10 heroes from Earths 1 and 2 and place them in limbo which magically causes all the heroes from Earth 2 to vanish (as calculated by Ultra-Humanite). Ultra-Humanite let everyone believe that there was an equal chance of either Earth having its heroes disappear which turned out to be a lie. The Earth 1 villains feel betrayed and do the dumbest thing they could possibly do. They may have been lied to but Ultra-Humanite was successful in getting rid of five Earth 1 heroes. The story has problems but it's a lot better than any of the stories in volume 5 of the Crisis series (which I gave two stars). It's helped tremendously having art from George Perez.

The second story is a big one. The centerpiece villain for the premier of All-Star Squadron was Per Degaton, a time travelling conqueror who Roy Thomas was turning into a major player in the DCU back in the early 80's. Just a year out from nearly taking over the world, Degaton has returned this time with the assistance of the awesome Crime Syndicate. This five issue story arc spans issue 207-209 of JLA and 14 and 15 of All-Star Squadron and it's co-plotted by Roy Thomas which can't help but improve the plot. Degaton's plan is to travel from 1947 to 1982 to gather technology and then steal Russian nuclear missiles from Cuba with the help of the Crime Syndicate in 1962 on Earth Prime and go back to 1942 during WW II and take over the world of Earth 2 with the backing of two dozen nuclear missiles. Whew. This one is a doozy but that's the fun of Degaton. These kinds of stories always open up a ton of questions. Where is the entire JSA of 1942 during this massive threat to humanity? How is Degaton able to repeatedly gather his own sizable personal army on such short notice? Why don't the heroes simply undo the original act that started this whole mess (the stealing of the missiles) since several of the heroes have time travelling abilities? Superman gave some lame response about the risk of further damaging the time stream but how else could they possibly save Earth Prime?

This is another story that seemed much more awesome when I was a preteen. In the end our heroes did the only thing they COULD do which was prevent the original theft of the nuclear missiles which then rendered nearly the entire rest of the story moot. The other problem was that the heroes completely dominated the villains. Firestorm, Zatanna and Green Lantern in particular seem nearly omnipotent and that doesn't even include Superman, Doctor Fate etc. The Crime Syndicate is a tough crew but no match for the combined JLA, JSA and All-Star Squadron and Degaton's army is nothing more than ordinary human's with modern (circa 1982) weapons. The final problem (and this bothered me even as a child) is the dramatic difference in quality between the JLA issues and All-Star Squadron. I find Roy Thomas and Rich Buckler to be a much more talented team than Gerry Conway and Don Heck.

So is this a good collection? It is for me. Despite the problems it still creates a warm fuzzy feeling of nostalgia. Would it be a good collection for someone who didn't read these when they were originally published? I can't step outside myself but I have a feeling that someone who is reading these for the first time wouldn't get nearly the same enjoyment I do. Still, they are some of the better JLA/JSA crossovers and the Per Degaton story may be the most daring crossover ever but it's bogged down by the problems inherent to time travel stories. I'm going to give this collection 4 stars but it may be getting a big boost from my feelings of nostalgia.
Tamesya
I was so looking forward to this release as these were the stories i read new back in the 80's. While they were still great, after all there is only 2 of them here as they are a 3 and 5 parters. I did Feel cheated when on the cover of the first issue it annouces a new large pin-up, and i know it was a great 2 page spread of the Complete Justice League on the left side and Complete Current Justice Society on the right side, yet for some reason it wasn't reprinted anywhere in the whole book! they also didn't include any nice remembrance in a forward or afterward like in all the other volumes. It still is a great book though.
Banal
Folks, please ignore the negative reviews. As someone who picked these comics up at the convenience store when I was kid, I'm nothing but enthusiastic about this release. These are the two stories I've been waiting since Volume One to be printed. If I had a complaint, it would only be that it took too long to print! My earliest comics, and what made me the most excited, were the annual JLA/JSA team-ups. This book is a perfect reprinting of those. To those who complain about the description in the title need to relax and realize they still got their money's worth with seven issues and two of the best of the annual crossovers. I'm not going to complain about the lack of the Perez spread.

TOP recommendation!
elektron
This last volume is one of the better in the series. Basically two stories fill it. In the first multi-parter, the Ultrahumanite, a brain switching baddie from earth 2, has a plan to eradicate all heroes from his world. In the second, Per Degaton uses a time machine to attempt to consider earth 2 & involves the JLA, JSA and the evil Crime Syndicate. So take a trip back to the silver age of DC and have fun.
Impala Frozen
First let me say that I love DC Comics and issues from this era in particular. DC's hcs and tpbs have really been badly produced lately. HCs have had terrible binding and many never reprint the covers of the individual issues reprinted inside(I hate that). With this being said, this book actually did reprint the covers so I was happy about that but it is advertised to include JLA issues 219 and 220(with the Crime Champions of Earth One) which were not included. The book did include the All-Star Squadron issues of that crossover(which when DC reprinted the All-Star Squadron Showcase volume 1, they didn't include the JLA issues which aggravated me again) so I could excuse the missing issues of JLA. The one thing I couldn't excuse, that pushed me to the end with DC, is that they didn't reprint the two page Perez pinup from JLA 195. It is in the middle of the story and is one of my most fond memories of this book. It is actually the first thing I flipped to see after the book came in the mail today. Totally disappointed and frustrated with DC in general.
Chankane
Here's the DC Universe at some of its best, not the garbage it's putting out in its "new 52". Classic cross-universe team-up adventures from the days before "Crisis on Infinite Earths". Two multi-part sagas in this book make for great reading for true comics fans!
Welahza
Classic stories of the JLA when the JLA was in its prime These team ups between the Earth one Justice League and Earth 2 Justice Society are simply the best comics you could ever get.
I love the good old days! I always looked forward to the JLA/JSA annual meetings.