carnevalemanfredonia.it

eBook Trouble download

by Terry Dodson,Mark Millar

eBook Trouble download ISBN: 0785150862
Author: Terry Dodson,Mark Millar
Publisher: Marvel; First Edition edition (June 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 120
ePub: 1142 kb
Fb2: 1571 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lrf mobi txt
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Despite boasting a very talented creative team in Mark Millar and the Dodsons (penciler Terry and his wife, Rachel, who always inks his work) that will no doubt attract many fans to Trouble, this book has to be considered a creative failure. The plot of Trouble involves two 17-year-old brothers and two female friends making separate trips to work in the Hamptons for the summer.

Trouble is a five-issue romance comic book limited series published in 2003 by Marvel Comics as a part of its mature Epic Comics imprint. Written by Mark Millar and illustrated by Terry and Rachel Dodson, the series deals with teen pregnancy. The basic concept was created by Bill Jemas and Joe Quesada.

Terry Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller. He is best known for his work on titles such as Harley Quinn, Trouble, Marvel Knights Spider-Man, Wonder Woman and Uncanny X-Men. His pencils are usually inked by his wife Rachel Dodson, who is a comic book inker and colorist. Dodson began his illustration career in 1991 at Revolutionary Comics, drawing issues of Rock 'N' Roll Comics that featured illustrated bios of performers like Rod Stewart ( and others.

High drama, infidelity and a pregancy! Innovative work by Mark Millar and Terry Dodson! Get A Copy. Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

Read Trouble comic online free and high quality. It is however not in main continuity, so more of a 'What if?" story. By Mark Miller and Terry Dodson. Collected in Trouble. Issue Issue Issue #3. Fast loading speed, unique reading type: All pages - just need to scroll to read next page. Issue Issue Issue Issue #2.

Quite aside from whether the book was or wasn't a good read, Trouble caused trouble for two reasons.

For those of you who don't recall those heady days, Trouble was part of the short-lived, Bill Jemas-shepherded revival of Marvel's Epic imprint and an attempt to create the first hit romance comic in god knows how long. Quite aside from whether the book was or wasn't a good read, Trouble caused trouble for two reasons.

Terrence "Terry" Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller. Dodson and writer Mark Millar produced a controversial limited series titled Trouble, which was published through Marvel's Epic Comics imprint.

Terrence "Terry" Dodson is an American comic book artist and penciller ider-Man, Wonder Woman and Uncanny X-Men.

Trouble by Mark Millar. Part of the Trouble Series)

Trouble by Mark Millar. Part of the Trouble Series). by Mark Millar and Terry Dodson.

Rachel Dodson/Colourist. Chris Eliopoulos/Letterer. Mary (Earth-13003)/Appearances. May (Earth-13003)/Appearances. Ben (Earth-13003)/Appearances. Richard (Earth-13003)/Appearances. Alternate Covers: Variant. Trouble Vol 1 Published.

Город: Scotland/ United StatesПодписчиков: 114 ты. себе: Netflix division Prez.

It's one of the most controversial stories Marvel has ever produced! When friends May and Mary take on a summer job after high school, they meet brothers Ben and Richard--and summer lovin' ensues! Prepare for sand, sun...and lots of sex! High drama, infidelity and a pregancy! Innovative work by Mark Millar and Terry Dodson!
Comments: (7)
Whiteseeker
Despite boasting a very talented creative team in Mark Millar and the Dodsons (penciler Terry and his wife, Rachel, who always inks his work) that will no doubt attract many fans to Trouble, this book has to be considered a creative failure.

The plot of Trouble involves two 17-year-old brothers and two female friends making separate trips to work in the Hamptons for the summer. They meet up, have romantic/sexual relationships with each other, and deal with the consequences. Much of the promotion for Trouble seems to focus on the supposed controversy about Marvel releasing a book with sex as a major theme and frequent occurrence. I don't know whether to give Marvel credit for taking this risk - it strikes me as at least a little calculated - but this is new territory for them. Since far more risqué comics have been produced for years by many other major companies, and Marvel has long since recognized that their core audience is much older than it used to be, I don't see what the big deal is. There's no nudity, and certainly nothing titillating in here, unless generically good-looking, idealized characters talking not-very-explicitly about the sex they're having is your idea of arousing (if not for hair color, I wouldn't have been able to tell the overly-muscled brothers or the two main girls apart.)

Therein lies the fatal flaw with this book. Terry Dodson draws the characters, and the whole book for that matter, the same way he draws superhero comics. But Trouble is not a superhero comic, and it is not entirely unprecedented. It's written like an independent comic - much like those by Adrienne Tomine, Charles Burns, Chester Brown, Debbie Drechsler, Seth, e.g. - which tells a totally plausible story meant to appeal to the emotions and intellects of fairly mature readers. Terry doesn't seem to grasp this, and his over-the-top art took me write out of the narrative. By the time I realized the comic wasn't meant to be a silly, hormone-charged romp, it was too late. I didn't take any of the characters or their problems seriously. The protagonists look like superheroes without the costumes. Their facial expressions feel inauthentic. The perspective changes and action lines and other standard superhero comic tropes imply a level of action and slapstick that simply isn't in the script.

While I'm normally a fan of the Dodsons, Terry reveals some serious limitations here. His art is not at its best, even by his own standards, but he clearly lacks ability to convey a wide range of genuine emotions in his art. He's good at drawing fun, pretty scenes, with attractive people bouncing around light-heartedly (Yes, even when it's superheroes fighting monsters.) He should stick to that.

I wouldn't mind seeing Mark Millar try something like this again, though, so long as he chooses the artist(s) based on their storytelling ability, not how sexy their characters look.
funike
The book's cover claims this is a "controversial" and "innovative" tale but I fail to find both in this case. The only thing controversial I see about this series is that there is a failure in cohesiveness among the characters names and personalities. The art is not bad but the story left me scratching my head in confusion and disappointment. First of all, as another reviewer stated, the characters are hard to tell apart by appearance. The main characters are two brothers Ben and Richie and the two girls are Mary and May. The characters are just as generic as their names: you have Richie the womanizer and Ben the sensitive guy, May the slut and Mary the goody-two-shoes. As far as sex goes, nothing titillating, we even get generic pictures of nature at one point, nothing very juicy. With a lack of connect with the characters I feel no excitement or sympathy.

In the 5th part of the story I am so confused about the characters I had to look back to see who was who. Ben's personality seems to change from unsure (sensitive guy) to confident. Whereas Richie begins taking Ben's interest in fixing cars, loses the mustang and becomes more of the sensitive type, staying home working with his dad, and writing letters to Mary. This change is quite abrupt. The only thing that transitions us into this change is some weak dialogue i.e. May says Richie has written her but she hasn't answered his letters, and Ben is driving the "'stang" and has a hot new girlfriend. I find the transition, weak and hard to believe.

I feel like I wasted more time trying to figure out who was who in order to make sense of the ending than I spent enjoying the story. I feel cheated, or maybe my expectations were too high.

Although I haven't read a great deal of graphic novels/comics I can say this: If you are looking for hot chicks I would recommend the Danger Girl series. If your looking for a complicated deep interesting story line with good characters, controversy, and even some sexual tension I recommend Watchman.

As far as Amazon is concerned, I am happy with their service the book was received in great condition and shipped within a reasonable amount of time.
Sti
Funny thing about this book... you see the name Mark Millar on it, and you think it'll be some sort of ironic take on superheroes, or some epic tale of villainy, or some sort of twisted-up thing. Well... it's a mindless romance. Young bodies, tender emotions, betrayal... the description on the dust cover uses the word "controversial", but I struggled to find anything of the sort. Somewhere around the middle it went deep into cliche-ville, then it went deeper and deeper and deeper... and yet somehow emerged with an interesting and clever ending. I nearly gave this three stars, since I didn't want to be mean, but it's really a waste of time. Not for the thrillseeking-hearted.