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eBook Spider-Man: Return of the Goblin (Peter Parker, Spider-Man) download

by Humberto Ramos,Paul Jenkins

eBook Spider-Man: Return of the Goblin (Peter Parker, Spider-Man) download ISBN: 0785110194
Author: Humberto Ramos,Paul Jenkins
Publisher: Marvel Enterprises; Gph edition (January 1, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 96
ePub: 1462 kb
Fb2: 1302 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi docx txt lrf
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels

In issue of "The Amazing Spider-Man" the web-head's arch enemy the Green Goblin learned Spider-Man's .

In issue of "The Amazing Spider-Man" the web-head's arch enemy the Green Goblin learned Spider-Man's secret identity and captured Peter Parker. At the end of that stunning issue, the first drawn by John Romita, S. he took over as the artist for the comic book from Steve Ditko, the Goblin unmasked himself and was revealed to be Norman Osborn. Written by Paul Jenkins with the distinctive pencils of Humberto Ramos inked by Wayne Faucher, the story begins with Norman Osborn expressing some harsh words at the grave of his son Harry and then going off to confront Spider-Man during a driving rainstorm.

Peter Parker, Spider-Man, Vol. 3 book Average story. Amazing art by Humberto Ramos. 3 book. The Green Goblin is back, and Norman Osborn won't. Perhaps the greatest story arc in Spider-Man’s history involved the Goblin in The Night Gwen Stacy Died. The story collected in The Return of the Goblin makes a ham-fisted effort to tie itself into that masterwork but only manages to cheapen its memory. Jun 22, 2013 Rajesh rated it liked it. Peter Parker, Spider-Man, Vol. 3: Return Of The Goblin. Peter Parker: Spider-Man (1999) (Single Issues) by. Paul Jenkins (writer). A spider-man I read after a long time. The story was pretty good. The artwork was different.

Peter Parker: Spider-Man: Return of the Goblin. Peter Parker: Spider-Man: Return of the Goblin. Paul Jenkins 1. Most issue appearances.

Regular cover artist Humberto Ramos lends his extraordinary talents to a special four-part story featuring the return of the web-slinger's most relentless foe: the Green Goblin! Peter Parker: Spider-Man Peter Parker: Spider-Man (1999 - 2003). Be the first to write one! Discussion.

Peter Parker: Spider-Man is the name of two comic book series published by Marvel Comics, both of which feature the character Spider-Man. Peter Parker: Spider-Man (originally titled simply Spider-Man), was a monthly comic book series published by Marvel Comics that ran for 98 issues from 1990 to 1998.

With a mad thirst for vengeance, the Green Goblin has returned with Peter Parker as his target, and he won't stop until he has the wall-crawler's heart on a silver platter. A Graphic Novel. Original.
Comments: (7)
Still In Mind
While the art is cartoonish (my apologies to Ramos fans:()....the story is rock solid. From the sense of dread brought about by Norman Osborn's deliberate open taunts and threats...a true sense of menace and forboding is set from the onset of this graphic novel. You might have read every comic ever written,but you do not expect what Norman delivers to Peter.... The parallels with Batman: Killing Joke are warranted but necessary to examine the deep hatred between two enemies as well as equally profound respect...the scene when the Goblin and Spiderman calmly and exhaustedly sit side by side and have a discussion about their long time war and even share a laugh is both genuine and downright mythic. While the book might have a lot of sound and fury...the end result including the final "gift" from Peter to Norman is epiphanic...this is truly one of the greatest Spiderman books ever put out and acknoweldges Jenkins' credit as a renowned story teller to be included in the upper eschelons along with Stan Lee and the more recent Strasynski. Truly a good read and must have for any long time Spider fans.
Nayatol
Goblin and SpiderMan is similar to the relationship between Batman and The Joker, a love/hate relationship.Goblin and SpiderMan is similar to the relationship between Batman and The Joker, a love/hate relationship.
Thordibandis
always a big fan of humberto ramos work , saw this and i was like : must have it ! loved the art , the story , the shippment was fast , secure and great !looking foward to keep colecting ramos work !
Connorise
I enjoyed the artwork in this comic more than I enjoyed the story. I felt like the intensity of The Green Goblin's plan just never really came through. I guess I expected the story to have a bit more weight considering the premise. That aside, its still a fun read and Ramos's artwork is as fun as ever.
Drelahuginn
I could go on, but you get the idea. I'm a HUGE Spider-man fan, but I could never stand the Green Goblin. Ever since ASM #121-122, every Norman Osborn story has always been the same- Norman hurts someone close to Peter (in this case, Flash Thompson), Peter gets mad, they fight, Peter comes inches from killing Norman, but stops himself, because he believes it to be wrong, Spider-man scores a moral victory. This is literally every Green Goblin story since the Death of Gwen Stacy story arc, which I also hated, as it started the whole line of boring and repetitive Green Goblin tales. I'm no novice; I've read many Green Goblin tales, but as I said, they all read the same, and this one is no different, with Jenkins following the Green Goblin formula down to a T. The only Goblin tales I've ever enjoyed are the ones not to feature Osborn, such as "Origin of the Hobgoblin" or "A New Goblin." I did enjoy Norman's portrayal in "Spider-man: Noir," but seeing how it's more or less a "What If?" story, I don't think that counts. Jenkins's dialogue is God-awful, and there's actually a scene in the end where Norman and Peter share a laugh, a page Jenkins clearly ripped from "Batman: The Killing Joke." Save yourself some time and money and buy a Spidey book about one of his more interesting villains, such as Dock Ock.
Ironrunner
In issue #39 of "The Amazing Spider-Man" the web-head's arch enemy the Green Goblin learned Spider-Man's secret identity and captured Peter Parker. At the end of that stunning issue, the first drawn by John Romita, Sr., he took over as the artist for the comic book from Steve Ditko, the Goblin unmasked himself and was revealed to be Norman Osborn. Clearly this was the greatest "to be continued" moment in the history of the character, and when Spider-Man defeated the Goblin and Norman Osborn conveniently ended up with amnesia, it was only delaying the inevitable. However, it was not until the Green Goblin killed Gwen Stacy that the secret of Spider-Man's true identity would die with Norman Osborn. Every Green Goblin encounter after this one has only been a shadow of the original, although the twin deaths of Gwen and Norman Osborn was rather significant. Peter Parker carries the scars of Gwen's death to this day, but with the death of the Green Goblin the "Spider-Man" comic had killed off its prime villain, something that as a general rule comic books try to avoid doing.
"Return of the Goblin" presents the four-part story "A Death in the Family" from "Peter Parker: Spider-Man" issues #44-47 from 2002. Yes, on one level this was certainly a marketing ploy, designed to take advantage of the summer blockbuster "Spider-Man" film last summer. But there are also some strong echoes from the classic Green Goblin stories of the past and even if you have not been keeping up to date on either Spider-Man comic book during the Volume 2 era as long as you know the key elements of the Spider-Man mythos you can appreciate this story. Written by Paul Jenkins with the distinctive pencils of Humberto Ramos inked by Wayne Faucher, the story begins with Norman Osborn expressing some harsh words at the grave of his son Harry and then going off to confront Spider-Man during a driving rainstorm. The initial battle is inconclusive: Spider-Man refuses to play Osborn's game, but he insists that he will get the web head's undivided attention. The Goblin does this by going on television and claiming it was Spider-Man who was responsible for the death of Gwen Stacy. However, that lie is only the first of several buttons Osborn starts pushing on Peter. Osborn's hirelings grab Flash Thompson, get him drunk, and put him behind the wheel of a tanker truck that is driven right through Peter Parker's classroom at school. Flash survives, but as sustained permanent and irreversible brain damage. Spider-Man has gotten the message loud and clear.
Clearly the importance of this story line is that it provides a fresh new tragedy for Peter Parker to feel guilty about. However Jenkins is also trying to make this more a contest between Norman Osborn and Peter Parker, which means it is more of a psychological duel for most of the story. But the end game still begins once the Goblin has pushed Spider-Man over the line. The ending might strike you as being a bit unbelievable, but then we have endured almost four decades of the Green Goblin remembering, forgetting, re-remembering, re-forgetting, etc., so at least Jenkins gets point for being creative and coming up with something different. Given that he was redefining the contest as more of a psychological battle of wills, you have to admit there is a logic to the outcome. The art by Ramos is perfect for the fights between Spider-Man and the Green Goblin, especially the initial contest in the downpour. Actually, I really like the way Ramos draws the Goblin, who has never looked more like a psychotic killer. Not a great story, but certainly an intriguing one and a better battle between the two arch enemies than the "Spider-Man" flick.