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eBook Weapons of the Metabaron download

by Alexandro Jodorowsky,Travis Charest,Zoran Janjetov

eBook Weapons of the Metabaron download ISBN: 1594650365
Author: Alexandro Jodorowsky,Travis Charest,Zoran Janjetov
Publisher: Humanoids (March 9, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 64
ePub: 1531 kb
Fb2: 1948 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: txt lit rtf lrf
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels

The trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov show how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy's most powerful . Way back in 2000, it was announced that Travis Charest had been commissioned to do the art for Jodorowsky's latest Metabaron book.

The trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov show how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy's most powerful and destructive weapons in an effort to become an invincible warrior. Travis Charest's (Artist of WILDCATS.

Writer: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Artist: Travis Charest, Zoran Janjetov. The creative trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov shows us how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy’s most powerful and destructive weapons in an effort to secure his position as the universe’s ultimate warrior. Publication date: 2010. Travis Charest's (Artist of Wildcats, WildC. A. T. s/X-Men: The Golden Age, and Star Wars comics Cover Artist) interpretation of 'The Metabarons' mythology.

Weapons Of The Metabaron book. The creative trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov shows us how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy s most powerful and destructive weapons in an effort to secure his position as the universe s ultimate warrior.

Weapons Of The Metabaron (Hardback). Alexandro Jodorowsky (author), Travis Charest (artist), Zoran Janjetov (artist). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Weapons of the Metabaron is a one-off story of The Saga of the Metabarons. It was written by Alejandro Jodorowsky, illustrated by Travis Charet and Zoran Janjetov and published by Les Humanoïdes Associés in 2008

Weapons of the Metabaron is a one-off story of The Saga of the Metabarons. It was written by Alejandro Jodorowsky, illustrated by Travis Charet and Zoran Janjetov and published by Les Humanoïdes Associés in 2008. Although the details are unclear, originally the graphic novel was meant to be longer, with each chapter chronicling the origin of one of the Metabaron's most powerful weapons.

Alexandro Jodorowsky, Travis Charest, Zoran Janjetov. The creative trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov shows us how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy's most powerful and destructive weapons in an effort to secure his position as the universe's ultimate warrior.

Travis Charest's (Artist of Wildcats, WildC. s/X-Men: The Golden Age, and Star Wars comics Cover Artist) interpretation of The Metabarons mythology. Alexandro Jodorowsky, Zoran Janjetov & Fred Beltran. L'Incal Tome 1. Alexandro Jodorowsky & Moebius. More by Alexandro Jodorowsky, Travis Charest & Zoran Janjetov. The Incal Classic Collection Alexandro Jodorowsky & Moebius. Weapons of the Metabaron. Alexandro Jodorowsky, Travis Charest & Zoran Janjetov. Before The Incal Alexandro Jodorowsky & Zoran Janjetov. The Technopriests Alexandro Jodorowsky, Zoran Janjetov & Fred Beltran.

Weapons of the Metabaron

Weapons of the Metabaron. If bad publicity is better than no publicity, then Weapons of the Metabaron is comfortably ahead of nearly every other Franco-Belgian genre comic currently in English release.

The creative trio of Jodorowsky, Charest, and Janjetov shows us how the Metabaron assembled the galaxy’s most powerful and destructive weapons in an effort to secure his position as the universe’s ultimate warrior.Travis Charest's (Artist of Wildcats, WildC.A.T.s/X-Men: The Golden Age, and Star Wars comics Cover Artist) interpretation of 'The Metabarons' mythology.
Comments: (7)
Lyrtois
It was quite a wait for this graphic novel, and while I'm glad to have finally gotten a look at it, it's largely a disappointment. Way back in 2000, it was announced that Travis Charest had been commissioned to do the art for Jodorowsky's latest Metabaron book. Then--silence for several years (I've forgotten exactly how long and can't seem to find the number anywhere; but--several years) followed by another announcement that in that time Charest had completed only about half the book, and the publisher had relieved him of the project and was having the remainder done by Zoran Janjetov, who had worked with author Alexandro Jodorowsky on other things. Then--from the American perspective--several more years passed; I eventually noticed that the French-language edition was out, but I wasn't going to pay euro prices plus overseas postage for a book I couldn't read all that well, so...more waiting. Finally, eleven years on, we have the English edition.

By my count the book has 29 pages of Charest art, plus a splash-page montage at the back, and the cover; and 26 pages of art by Janjetov. Both artists are credited for pages 39 to 60, although page 39 appears to be all Charest, and pages 40-60 appear to be all Janjetov; maybe Charest had done the layouts? (The page count and page numbers don't match up because the story starts on page 7.) It looks as though the story was tweaked to make Charest's pages a dream-flashback; Janjetov does a four-page introductory episode and finishes out the book.

The two artists' styles don't complement one another. Janjetov's is competent but fairly conventional, and colored in a more or less standard European style. Charest's art is painted, highly detailed, almost photo-realistic in places, and colored from a much different palette. Janjetov's Metabaron looks years older than Charest's, though they're the same character in the same timeframe. In some places Charest's art reminds me of Richard Corben's-- maybe it's just the shadowing on some of the faces at first, combined with the fact that, like Corben's Den, the Metabaron is bald? Or maybe it's partly due to the thought that Charest may have taken away Corben's one-time unofficial title and reputation as "world's slowest comics artist"...

I suppose the story deserves some attention. Um--well: the Metabaron is tasked by the eight intra-sleepers of the Omphal to acquire Praxis, the sword with a soul, with which he can capture the Omnigraal, because he'll need those, along with his own endotronics, mecha-technics and various models of oko-bombs, to defeat the Transpineal Eye, a renegade mini-computer, and the vile Hulzgeminis who threaten the eight universes, and ... it doesn't really matter. Jodorowsky's story is an odd amalgam of science fiction, myth, dream and Saturday morning cartoon. The Metabaron is the undefeatable warrior, his sentient metacraft cannot fail, and with Praxis, he's equipped with, basically, a magic sword, so there's little suspense. The one episode that engages some emotion comes early on, when the young Metabaron must demonstrate that he has mastered his training by fighting and killing his "father-mother" predecessor (which seems like a rather wasteful tradition).

The big attraction here is Charest's art (and that's not just my opinion--look at the cover; Charest's name is printed at the top and larger than the other two contributors' names together). Even though Charest's pages are very, very good in some ways, they're vaguely disappointing, too. The art seems dark, and the figures in many of the panels too small. I think I picked up a clue to why this is from pages 2-3 of the book. This is one of Charest's panels--the last one he completed, actually--enlarged to a double-page splash. A background pattern/texture, the same used on the book's cover, has been added, which is one reason it took me a while to register what I was seeing. And what one sees when one studies this enlarged panel is a level of detail, a subtlety of color, shading and modeling that's simply not visible in the smaller-size version on page 39. The same is true to a lesser degree of pages 4-5, another panel enlarged to a double-page spread. If Charest put that much effort and detail into most or many of the rest of his panels, one can begin to understand how the project could take him so long, and it begins to explain my vague feeling of dissatisfaction with many of the beautifully-rendered pages--Charest's art is simply printed too small for the reader to get the full effect of the craft and effort that went into it. His pages would look much, much better at twice the size, or at least in an oversized format like, say, Barry Smith's "Storyteller". However, I can see why the publisher wouldn't have wanted to do that; at that size, Janjetov's pages would likely look stark and over-simple. The differences between the two art styles mean one or the other has to be presented in a disadvantageous format, and it was Charest's pages that got the short end of the stick.

This could have been a comics milestone. Instead, it's been reduced to a footnote, recording a disappointment. Oh well.
Samuhn
Let me just say that I am a big Travis Charest fan. His artwork is fantastic as usual. Unfortunately he is very slow and did not complete all of the interiors which detracts from the overall package. I'm not familiar with the Metabaron (s) so I really had no idea what to expect from the storyline. The story wasn't the worst thing I've ever read but the dialogue was weak throughout. Maybe the translation to English was poor. Anyway, its a shame to see such a spectacular artist put so much time into something that is so forgettable. If you're a Charest fan I would recommend you borrow this to see the art, reading it is optional.
Querlaca
When I was purchasing this book I was hoping that the reviews for it were a little harsh but it seems to me that it is true and the only decent thing about this book is the art. The story is not very exciting and the book itself is very short. However it was still good enough for me to not hate it. I really love the Metabarons book and its nice to have another book about the Metabarons. I just wish Jodoworsky would have tried a little harder on the story. If your a fan of The Metabarons I think it is still worth the purchase
Loni
Half the art was fantastic, the other half was filler. Even the editing was poor. After the "battle" with the giant dragon bat thing, there is a panel where No Name is pictured but the text is obviously something that his fathermother should be saying. It's just a poorly constructed piece of work. This short story seems more like an attempt by Jodorowsky to capitalize on his other successes than any kind of inspired original story telling.
spark
Why haven't the Metabarons hasn't made it to the big screen is beyond me. I believe the Metabarons would be the next great space saga if someone would pick it up.
Mavegelv
Good Quality, Good Price, Brand New, Awesome it is everything I expected and more. I will recommend this product and this seller to everyone.
Shak
Alexandro Jodorowsky's Metabaron series is one of most ambitious and gripping science fiction comics around and a favorite of mine.

A few years ago it was announced Jodorowsky was teaming with American artist Travis Charest to do a follow-up. More than 5 years later it's finally here, and it's real disappointment. To begin with Charest does less than half of the art in this slim 60 page book. The rest is from Zoran Janjetov a European artist whose clean minimal style is at odds with Charest's highly detailed art.

The story itself is an epic quest for 4 legendary weapons but really didn't flow for me. We don't get a proper introduction for the weapons, the quest or what it all means. Parts feel like Jodorwsky is making it up as he goes along. At one stage the Metabaron is trapped helplessly only to have his sword reveal a new power perfect for saving him. It's a clumsy and disappointing deus ex machina.

Given the talent involved I never blinked at paying $20 for just 60 pages but I left unimpressed and disappointed. I don't recommend it.
I had never been more excited about a comic book project than I was when this collaboration between Jodo and Charest was announced. This artist and writer combo appeared to be a match made in comic book/sci fi heaven. The short preview story featured in Alpha/Omega only served to raise the hype. I read and re-read that story for years imagining what the completed graphic novel would be like. I was so hyped for years for this project. Eventually the wait just dragged too long though and my interest faded. Finally, the book came out in France. I ordered the French edition.

Now finally it's in English so I can read it. Definitely not worth the wait. The art is amazing but there is too little Travis Charest material considering the amount of time it took for this work to reach publication. The story is also nothing to write home about.

Sadly another comics project that did not live up to its potential.

That said, the book is worth buying for the artwork alone.