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eBook The Last of the Southern Girls (Voices of the South) download

by Willie Morris

eBook The Last of the Southern Girls (Voices of the South) download ISBN: 0807119563
Author: Willie Morris
Publisher: LSU Press (August 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1601 kb
Fb2: 1213 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi lit doc rtf
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Graphic Novels

Willie Morris' cleverly conceived and brilliantly executed novel (loosely . The Last of the Southern Girls (Voices of the South). I wanted this book to be so much more! The most entertaining part of the book comes from the southern advice, but even that was rare.

Eventually, she becomes romantically involved with a prominent congressman - an idealist, a reformer, a man perhaps headed for the very pinnacle of political life.

Morris' trademark was his lyrical prose style and reflections on the American South, particularly the Mississippi Delta.

Willie Morris's cleverly executed novel (loosely based on a real-life figure). Published by Thriftbooks

Willie Morris's cleverly executed novel (loosely based on a real-life figure). Published by Thriftbooks. As a Southern girl who moved to Washington, . directly follwing graduation, I believe Morris accurately depicts the lovely and despicable traits of two cultures where social obligations and expectations supercede reality.

Still, rather than being merely a vivid interpreter of Southern life, Mr. Morris was someone ahead of his time in exploring the confluence of region and nation, and how the South's distinctive experience of race, family and history was so deeply a part of the nation's experience as well. 'Willie said that Mississippi is America writ large,'' said Richard Howorth, owner of Square Books, the literary haunt in Oxford, Miss. 'And to understand Willie you have to know that he had this amazing knowledge of American history.

This isn't really just Carol's story - that of a girl for whom everything was both too attainable and too perishable; it's undershot (and here Morris is at his best) with a commemorative sense of the past and an inalienable sense of place.

This isn't really just Carol's story - that of a girl for whom everything was both too attainable and too perishable; it's undershot (and here Morris is at his best) with a commemorative sense of the past and an inalienable sense of place which is never too far north from home. In all those shadows and memories, the bloom is still on the cottonwood.

Home Morris, Willie The Last of the Southern Girls. South Carolina's largest internet antiquarian bookshop with specialties in Southern Literature and South Caroliniana history. The Last of the Southern Girls. Published by Alfred a Knopf, New York. Condition: Near Fine Hardcover.

O kindreds of the Markmen, hearken the words I say; For no chancehap assembly is gathered here to-day

O kindreds of the Markmen, hearken the words I say; For no chancehap assembly is gathered here to-day. The fire hath gone around us in the hands of our very kin, And twice the horn hath sounded, and the Thing is hallowed in. Will ye hear or forbear to hearken the tale there is to tell? There are many mouths to tell it, and a many know it well. And the tale is this, that the foemen against our kindreds fare Who eat the meadows desert, and burn the desert bare. Therewith he made an end, and deeper and longer was the murmur of thehost of freemen, amidst which Bork gat him down from the Speech-Hill, hisweapons clattering about him, and mingled with the men of his kindred.

Lally is a rich girl whose father writes books and plays Polo. A flirtatious Southern belle is compromised with one of her suitors. The toast of every man, and the envy of every woman in London's smart set. After 23 years of marriage, he decides to divorce his wife, and marry Mrs. Chevers  . Director: Sam Taylor. Next . The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1937). (Print Ad- The Evening Independent,((St. Petersburg, Fl. ) 14 August 1929).

Compilation by various artists. O Day by Bessie Jones. Katy Went Fishing With Her Hook and Line by Hobart Smith. Walk in the Parlor by Sid Hemphill & Lucius Smith. Wished I Was in Heaven Sitting Down by Mississippi Fred McDowell. Po' Lazarus by Bright Light Quartet. The Lass of Loch Royale by Neil Morris. Three Nights Drunk by . Turkey in the Straw by Charlie Everidge & Neil Morris. Pharaoh by Sidney Carter.

Carol Hollywell is beautiful, smart, elegant, and charming. A debutante from De Soto Point, Arkansas, and a recent graduate of Ole Miss, she is heir to a good southern name and a small southern fortune. She knows what she wants and, more important, knows how to get it. She is, in other words, the prototypical southern belle, a Scarlett O’Hara for the 1950s, and when she moves to Washington, D.C., in 1957, she sets the town on its ear.

Willie Morris’ cleverly conceived and brilliantly executed novel (loosely based on a real-life figure) follows this headstrong woman from her arrival at the Capital and traces the ups and downs of her life in the political and social whirl of the city over the next decade and a half. Eventually, she becomes romantically involved with a prominent congressman―an idealist, a reformer, a man perhaps headed for the very pinnacle of political life. It is at first a dazzling alliance, yet the genuine satisfactions they find in their relationship cannot long withstand the pressures of the ambitions both of them harbor. The very drives that initially brought them together in the end propel their love affair into jeopardy.

Morris paints a devastatingly accurate portrait not only of a power-hungry woman but also of the society that feeds such hunger. His descriptions of Washington and its denizens―the politicos, the journalists, the socialites, and the hangers-on―are nothing short of breathtaking.

Comments: (4)
Kamuro
Willie Morris' novel was supposed to be based loosely on a real Washington power hungry Democrat woman from the fifties. I can only think of Jackie Kennedy but the protagonist, Carol, is a fairly rich southern belle from Arkansas. She may be someone Morris knows, not such a public figure. Carol takes on Washington by storm, marries a rich man whom she doesn't love, has a child, mentioned sometimes, divorces and takes up with a congressman. The writing is quite dry but maybe that is what the writer intended since Washington is a bureaucratic desert. Southerners usually have a sense of humor but Carol lacks that trait, and is all for herself. Perhaps she becomes a feminist in the seventies and and becomes a woman, leaving that southern girl in the dust.
ndup
Willie Morris had the ability to bring people and places to life in a convincing manner. To anyone that has any knowledge of the South and of politics this book was excellent. It was not a sugar coated telling of "feel good". but of offering the choices that people believed were necessary for their own perspective of life.
lacki
I like Willie Morris but read his non fiction instead, New York Days for instance. It is all about when he was editor of Harper's in NYC, very interesting to have Southerner at the helm. Try it.
Burgas
Just couldn't get into this book. I don't like superfluous writing; my interest waned early on.