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eBook Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories (Library) download

by Michael Chabon,Ben Katchor

eBook Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories (Library) download ISBN: 0316482943
Author: Michael Chabon,Ben Katchor
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; 1st edition (September 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 112
ePub: 1301 kb
Fb2: 1107 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc mobi lit rtf
Category: Comics
Subcategory: Comic Strips

The Knipl stories collected here resurrect a lost metropolis and its residents

The Knipl stories collected here resurrect a lost metropolis and its residents. Ben Katchor's marvelous collection of eight-panel short stories, "Julius Knipl Real Estate Photographer", would surely have won the 1996 National Book Award for literary comic strip fiction if there had been such a prize.

Julius Knipl, the rumpled antihero of Ben Katchor's cult cartoon strip, comes alive in this all-new collection of strange and strangely absorbing urban adventures

Julius Knipl, the rumpled antihero of Ben Katchor's cult cartoon strip, comes alive in this all-new collection of strange and strangely absorbing urban adventures. The Knipl stories collected here resurrect a lost metropolis and its residents.

Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories by Ben Katchor (Introduction) (1996). Casanova: Acedia (Backup story with Matt Fraction) (illustrator: Gabriel Bá) (2015).

Ben Katchor's dreamscape is peopled by transistor radio listeners, door-knob triers, false eyebrow importers, and a ting real estate photographer named Julius Knipl. The vaguely melancholy stories in his eight-panel comic strips reflect a fondness for the forgotten, the obscure, and the merely overlooked.

Ben Katchor (born November 19, 1951, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American cartoonist and illustrator best known for his critically acclaimed comic strip Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer. He has contributed comics and drawings to The Forward, The New Yorker, Metropolis magazine, and weekly newspapers in the United States. A Guggenheim Fellowship and MacArthur Fellowship recipient, Katchor was described by author Michael Chabon as "the creator of the last great American comic strip.

Start by marking Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer as Want to Read . Michael Chabon's lyrical introduction to this collection is not to be missed, either. It piques the interest without sullying the flavor.

Start by marking Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Ben Katchor, in the wry confines of Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer, strikes a note of sustained surrealism that both satisfies and sparks new desires. Moody and subtle, Katchor's lopsided sketches complement the text with which the images are awash. Julius Knipl is inundated by proper names that carry the weight of specificity. A foray into this world will not go unrewarded.

Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer. The Collected Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe. new York: Modern Library, 1992. Michael Chabon, Maps and Legends. Series: ) Thank you for reading books on BookFrom. Boston: Little, Brown, 1996. Proust, Marcel, 3, 135. Remembrance of Things Past.

Author Michael Chabon described Ben Katchor (b. 1951) as the creator of the last great American comic strip. Katchor's comic strip Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories, which began in 1988, brought him to the attention of the readers of alternative weekly newspapers along with a coterie of artists who have gone on to public acclaim. In the mid-1990s, NPR ran audio versions of several Julius Knipl stories, narrated by Katchor and starring Jerry Stiller in the title role. An early contributor to RAW, Katchor has contributed to Forward, New Yorker, Slate, and weekly newspapers.

The Best American Short Stories 2005. Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer. by Ben Katchor · Michael Chabon. by Michael Chabon · Katrina Kenison. Michael Chabon is back with a brand-new collection that reinvigorates the stay-up-all-night, edge-of-the seat, fingernail-biting, page-turning tradition of literary short stories, featuring Margaret Atwood, Stephen King, Peter Straub, David Mitchell, Jona.

detail from Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer, episode 326, 1994. Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer is a weekly comic strip written and drawn by Ben Katchor since 1988. A collection of Julius Knipl strips was published in 1991 by Penguin Books (as a RAW One-Shot) as Cheap Novelties: The Pleasures of Urban Decay. Another collection was published in 1996 by Little, Brown and Company under the title Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories. Introduction to Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer Archived 2006-10-20 at the Wayback Machine, Ben Katchor (Little Brown, 1996). a b Aubrey 2012, p. 429.

Julius Knipl, the rumpled antihero of Ben Katchor's cult cartoon strip, comes alive in this all-new collection of strange and strangely absorbing urban adventures. The Knipl stories collected here resurrect a lost metropolis and its residents, summoning up half-forgotten yesterdays and celebrating the surreal substrate of the quotidien.
Comments: (7)
Gerceytone
This is just about my favorite book. I read the review in the New York Times, which was a rave. I went out and bought it, struggled with the panels at first, but once I got the hang of how to read the narrative along with the inter-woven dialogue, I was simply entranced. Katchor's world is the world I imagine my father grew up in -- the big noisy depression-era city. Katchor has an almost surreal ability to see how unrelated events and moments are connected. Each page is a wonderfully crafted short story, and each panel drawing is packed with humor and nuance, almost as if it were itself drawn by one of Katchor's fallen characters.
Xcorn
But the Julius Knipl graphic stories surely are. They are not remotely like anything else I've ever seen. If Franz Kafka had had a sense of humor, and had been able to draw, he might have created something like this. Not all of the strips will make you laugh; some will make you wonder, "What was that all about?" -- and then you'll want to read them again. A strange collection, and not for all tastes, but for those who find these stories compelling, it's a must-own item.
inform
Item arrived in great shape. Thank you!
Usanner
Nice book, sometimes hard to understand, because I am a dutch guy. And humor is the hardest thing to understand...
But I do like the humor from Ben. His hilarous surrealistic humor.
Dynen
Ben Katchor's marvelous collection of eight-panel short stories, "Julius Knipl Real Estate Photographer", would surely have won the 1996 National Book Award for literary comic strip fiction if there had been such a prize. In his review, Edward Sorel, who the New York Times considers "one of America's foremost political satirists", called Katchor "the most poetic, deeply layered artist ever to draw a comic strip."

Katchor's hero, the peripatetic free lance real estate photographer Julis Knipl, is a nose-to-the-lobby-directory observer of urban culture, a character without counterpart in American letters. For one thing, Knipl strides through time, glides is more like it, over the urban landscapes of the mid-20th Century, to focus on the details that we love and miss about the city past.

Except for Michael Chabon's knowledgeable introduction, everything in this book, from the front and back covers and endpapers to the ninety marvelously telling black and white comic strip stories of Knipl's wanderings, flows from Katchor's hand and mind. Each strip evokes our hopelessly hopeful confidence in our ability to get by in one improbable way or another. Consider the text of the shop window and billboard advertisements that set the scene for Knipl's entrance. (See the accompanying front cover illustration.): "Mortal Coil Mattresses" on one wall sign, "Forget About It! Drink Oblivion Water" on the sidewalk fruit stand, and, on a building under construction, a sign announcing "On this Site CARFARE CITY Opening 2010."

The characters that people Knipl's world are as familiar as they are absurd. For examples: Noel Kapish, "the famous double-talk artist of the 1950's and 60's," Al Mooner, the Pygmy Penitentiary impressario, and the two foot soldiers in the Consolation Army "That philanthropic organization, set up on military lines, to encourage flirtation, coition and common law marriage."

A good deal of what the author is getting at is the slightly daffy nature of the work we do for a living. He introduces us to the "Hink Eradicator" who makes his rounds toward the "close of each business day . . offering to remove and expunge unwanted textual material" and to the five and ten cent store "demonstrator of [an] eyeglass defogger."

If you pick up this book and put it down without wanting more, much more, I'll send you a month's supply of "Mother of Mercy Brand" aspirin from the "Hall of Pain" drug store you'll see on the back cover of the book.

Endnote. Appreciation of Katchor's wonderful gifts started with Lawrence Weschler's New Yorker profile (August 9, 1993). Michael Chabon's introduction to this volume is equally lavish in its praise. Then there came Edward Sorel's review, quoted above, among others. His most recent book, "The Cardboard Valise" (March, 2011) takes Katchtor to foreign realms. I've ordered it and plan to review it one of these days. In the meantime, hoping to catch Knipl's eye, I spend my day replacing the worn out Bakelite tips on old shoe laces.
Jairani
A "knipl" is colloquial Yiddish for a secret stash, like money saved for a rainy day or some last relic of an old way of life. Those populating the unnamed city of Ben Katchor's extended graphic novel are essentially gripped by nostalgia for a way of life that probably never existed. In cartoon vignettes, they pine for the days when you could visit the famed "Pygmy Penitentiary" (attempted breakouts scheduled every hour) and pick up some of Virosh Sherue's bottled rain water on the way home. Many try to preserve their way of life, if only because they fear change ("Static Day" is an official holiday) and grab a hold on the present as if it were a lifeline (one man has dozens of items on lay-away in stores thruought the city, because the goods are kept perpetually new until he has to pick them up). And the city doesn't lack for opportunists - like street toughs who scavenge TV antennae from buildings that have gone cable; tour operators who bus tourists through the decayed parts of the city (the driver soon becomes the primaddona) or show biz operators who conceive of turning manual labor into public spectacle. For much of the city, it's business as usual as reporters for the vile evening combinator scour the city for tales of the dreams of its populace, or as bra-strap statisticians try to chart the rise and fall of the city's fortunes. The titular real estate photographer notes all dispassionately. Katchor parodies and mourns his citizens at the same time, yet he never condescends to them not tries to milk them for tears. Instead, Katchor, through the lens of his alter ego, a real estate photographer seems to have mastered the perfect balance of bittersweet, a quest that, for his charachters, seems one more casualty lost to the years.