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eBook Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living download

by Thomas R. Edgar

eBook Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living download ISBN: 0825425107
Author: Thomas R. Edgar
Publisher: Kregel Academic & Professional (June 4, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1451 kb
Fb2: 1350 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Theology

Thomas Edgar has put forward this effort as an attempt to argue for the ceasing of certain spiritual gifts such as tongues, miracles, healings, etc. In the process, he critiques some of the positions held by prominent folks in the charismatic camp who believe these gifts are still operative.

Thomas Edgar has put forward this effort as an attempt to argue for the ceasing of certain spiritual gifts such as tongues, miracles, healings, etc. In the process, he critiques some of the positions held by prominent folks in the charismatic camp who believe these gifts are still operative today. While still not personally convicted of cessationism, I think Edgar does advance some very good points for this position

Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living

Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living. 0825425107 (ISBN13: 9780825425103). Edgar works through NT scripture around issues of the gifts of the Spirit and carefully articulates an understanding of how some of these gifts operated in the early church and no longer do today. In the first few pages I was concerned that the book might become a bit of a beat up, however he soon began to deal with the text and did so in an excellent fashion.

A summary of some of the major features of Edgar's work will help us understand his thesis in more detail.

Promise of the Spirit : Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living. Examines the primary biblical texts in the charismatic debate and affirms the traditional biblical view of the gifts of the Spirit.

book by Thomas R. Edgar. Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit : Affirming the Fullness of God's Provision for Spiritual Living.

9 to the end of the book, Edgar develops conclusions along two lines. The first conclusion is that the burden of proof rests with noncessationists, not cessationists.

Edgar writes, Rather than seeking a surprise, we should be satisfied with what we have in Christ (p. 263). 9 to the end of the book, Edgar develops conclusions along two lines. Proponents of the charismatic movement have managed to shift the burden of proof regarding the temporary nature of some gifts to their opponents.

5 Thomas R. Edgar, Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God s. .Variety of spiritual gifts: six different New Testament passages contain lists of spiritual gifts (Rom 12:6-8; 1 Cor 7:7; 12:8-10; 28; Eph 4:11; 1 Pet 4:11). v. Spiritual gifts are to be used in love.

Variety of spiritual gifts: six different New Testament passages contain lists of spiritual gifts (Rom 12:6-8; 1 Cor 7:7; 12:8-10; 28; Eph 4:11; 1 Pet 4:11). 1 Cor 13:1-3: If I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but do not have love, I have become a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.

Satisfied by the Promise of the Spirit: Affirming the Fullness of God's. Nee's books include Come, Lord Jesus; A Living Sacrifice; The Normal Christian Life; The Communion of the Holy Spirit; The Finest of the Wheat; and Love Not the World; among many others. Since the early 1970s, Stephen Kaung has translated more than forty of Watchman Nee's simple, yet profound books for western audiences.

The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me, Because the LORD has anointed me To bring good news to the afflicted; He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to captives And freedom to prisoners; T.

The Spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me, Because the LORD has anointed me To bring good news to the afflicted; He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, To proclaim liberty to captives And freedom to prisoners; To proclaim the favorable year of the LORD And the day of vengeance of our God; To comfort all who mourn .

The Spirit of Law (French: De l'esprit des lois, originally spelled De l'esprit des loix, translated into English as The Spirit of Laws, The Spirit of the Laws, and The Spirit of Law, is a treatise on political theory, as well as a pioneeri.

The Spirit of Law (French: De l'esprit des lois, originally spelled De l'esprit des loix, translated into English as The Spirit of Laws, The Spirit of the Laws, and The Spirit of Law, is a treatise on political theory, as well as a pioneering work in comparative law, published in 1748 by Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu.

Examines the primary biblical texts in the charismatic debate and affirms the traditional biblical view of the gifts of the Spirit.
Comments: (7)
Mr.jeka
This book provides a biblical response to the modern day charismatic movement. Dr Edgar argues for the cessation position, that is, that the miraculous gifts ceased during the days of the Apostles. He does NOT claim that God has ceased entirely from performing the miraculous. Rather, he has in view the specific miraculous gifts. The main point of the book is that we must test modern day phenomena according to God's Word instead of assuming that it is the same as the New Testament gift. If you cherish God's Word and affirm its authority over you as a Christian, I would commend this book to you.

I have heard charismatics largely argue for the validity of their position based on personal experience. The strength of this book is the exegesis of the biblical texts that discuss the role and operation of these gifts.

At one time, I was on the fence on this issue because I believed that there was not a specific bible verse to prove that they ceased. However, I understand now that we must, in the words of Edgar, "...build biblical arguments inductively by putting together various biblical facts regarding the gifts, noticing that no verse teaches that gifts will continue." (pg 27) It's another way of looking at the issue that I had not considered.

Wayne Grudem (whom I highly respect and value His writings and perspective) incorrectly argues for inferior, fallible gifts that are different than the New Testament gift. As Dr Edgar points out, he fails to "...show one specific example of a gift given to the church which operates on a lesser or inferior level. This seems particularly inappropriate for [those that argue] that there is not one verse that specifically states gifts will cease." (pg 101) In other words, the burden for proof is on those that maintain that gifts are continuing, but at an inferior level. Where do we see gifts of prophecy and healing that fail in the New Testament? Does it match the Bible's description? No.

Considerable space is given to the issue of tongues. Edgar makes a compelling argument that the evidence of Scripture is that the tongues of the New Testament were languages. In other words, one cannot separates Acts 2 from 1 Corinthians 12-14. There is no evidence of "ecstatic" and "unintelligible" speech.

Again, I would commend to the reader the exegesis of the key Biblical texts. However, here are some other notable quotations from the book:
- "Most cessationists are unaware that charismatics have, in effect, conceded these cessationists arguments [that the manifestations we see today are not at the same qualitative level as those of the apostles]. Many charismatics probably do not realize what these "responsible" charismatics [such as Grudem] are actually doing to their beliefs." (pg 101) The point being is that once you concede this point, you must be open toward cessationism at some level.
- "...the tendency [for charismatics] is to confuse God's miraculous works." (pg 37) I've witnessed this personally (see the Amazon review for this book "Read but one page and that was enough for me"). People confuse miracles with the continuance of the gifts.
- "Neither do we have any evidence that gifts of miracles and healing were widely distributed in the church." (pg 114)
- Paul writes to Timothy regarding Timothy's illness (1 Tim 5:23) and yet does not tell Timothy to search for a healer (pg 116).
- "How can Paul command tongue speakers to keep quiet...unless he expects them to be in control of their speech?" (pg 143)...as opposed to the "I can't help it, the Spirit controls" argument.
- "The major passage allegedly requiring the meaning of `ecstatic utterance' is 1 Corinthians 12-14. But rather than supporting this meaning, the passage refutes it. First Corinthians 12:3 show that tongues are intelligible. First Corinthians 13:1 clearly includes the `tongues of men.' First Corinthians 14:22 is a deduction regarding tongues based upon an Old Testament passage (Isa 28:11) that refers to foreign languages...the necessity that tongues be a sign and the fact they are self-controlled all favor the meaning of language..." (pg 153)
- "if tongues are to edify the individual speaker or provide better communication with God, one would expect such to be given to all believers, since God desires all to be edified and all to pray. The Bible clearly says, however, that all do NOT speak in tongues (1 Cor 12:30)" (pg 166)
- "First Corinthians 14:22, the only verse which specifically states the purpose for tongues, says `Wherefore tongues are for a sign, not for those who believe, but to the UNBELIEVERS..." (pg 184) (emphasis mine)
- "One of the basic assumptions made by charismatic groups the Spirit operates the same way today as he did in the first century. But the Bible makes no statement that all gifts will continue..." (pg 231)
- "There is no instance in the Bible where anyone received a gift by seeking it or as a result of believing in that gift." (pg 236) Arguing that absence of these gifts in history is due to a lack of faith by Christians of the last 1700+ years.
Unnis
This book is an excellent discussion and study of the New Testament gifts, specifically prophecy, tongues, healing and miracles. Edgar studies and discusses each one in an honest, but definitive way that will be instructive and helpful to any true student of the Bible. He bases everything primarily on Scriptre and it's ultimate authority. This emphasis is a needed one in the ongoing debate and discussion of spiritual gifts of the holy spirit. Every Christian ought to have this book as required reading.
Uste
Great book! Upholds cessationism versus continuationism. Very insightful.
Skyway
Precise exegesis of the texts relating to continuationism and cessationism. Very clear explanation of why the texts mean what they mean and dont mean what they dont mean.
Nea
Thomas Edgar has put forward this effort as an attempt to argue for the ceasing of certain spiritual gifts such as tongues, miracles, healings, etc. In the process, he critiques some of the positions held by prominent folks in the charismatic camp who believe these gifts are still operative today. While still not personally convicted of cessationism, I think Edgar does advance some very good points for this position.
First of all, I want to comment on Edgar's theological bent for those who might be concerned about it. It is true that Edgar is a dispensationalist who teaches at a heavily dispensationalist seminary. But for the most part, I found that this book really did not heavily emphasize dispensationalism per se. So for those who might be concerned about reading this book because of the possibility that it would be Walvoordian in terms of being soaked with dispensationalism, I personally don't think this book does that, which I consider a plus.
The clear strength of the book is Edgar's Biblical exegesis of various contentious passages in the spiritual gifts debate, most notably Acts 2 and 1 Corinthians 12-14. His conclusion that the contemporary charismatic view and practice of tongues bears almost no resemblance to the authentic gift discussed in Scripture is very persuasive. I also felt that he made a very strong argument relative to the elimination of the 'office' of apostle shortly after the end of the first century, and thus the uniquely apostolic gifts ceased with them. This is a powerful argument, especially since the charismatics in the operative camp tend to rely heavily on experiential arguments to advance their cause, but run up against difficulties in explaining the lack of documented and authenticated experiences of spiritual gifts throughout church history. This is a strong point in Edgar's favor.
Edgar also does a good job of critiquing the musings of Wayne Grudem relative to his theory of reduced, or 'fallible' gifts still being operative today. Grudem is a highly respected scholar and someone I personally respect a great deal, but I think Edgar does a very good job of invalidating Grudem's hypothesis here.
Edgar is less successful in his extensive critique of Jack Deere. Now while I don't have any particular allegiance to Deere or his views, I felt that Edgar was being terribly inconsistent in his treatment of Deere. Edgar chides Deere for his emphasis on experience rather than sound Biblical exegesis, arguing that experience is not a valid barometer of truth. Fair enough. The problem is that Edgar himself puts forth an experience argument in favor of cessationism in this book, in addition to his Biblical exegesis argument. Edgar spends one chapter arguing that church history supports cessationism. But what Edgar is really doing here is relying on experience, or a lack thereof, throughout church history in order to make this case. So in this respect, he is violating his own scholarship standards. Now, to be fair, Edgar obviously knew that he was going to be vulnerable to such a charge, which is why he spends quite a few pages early on in the book trying to define what he means by 'experience' in such a way as to exclude his historical argument from being an argument from experience. But in an effort to wiggle around in such a way as to supposedly immune his historical argument from the experience emphasis upon which he then criticizes Deere, I found his definitional gymnastics to be decidedly unpersuasive. The bottom line is that when Edgar decided to offer up an experience argument of his own, he lost quite a bit of credibility to then turn around and criticize Deere for doing the same thing. This represents a formidable weakness in this book in terms of sound and consistent scholarship.
But nonetheless, I give the book 4 stars because I do think the section on Biblical exegesis goes a long way towards rescuing the cessationist perspective he's trying to defend. Edgar clearly should have stayed away from his historical argument due to the compromising position it puts him in relative to critiquing others with scholarship standards he exempts himself from. If a cessationist believes that the weight of church history favors cessationism, he can use this point without formally advancing it as part of his own apologetic. If Jack Deere or Wayne Grudem believe in the current operativeness of charismatic gifts and rely disproportionately on experience for their argumentation, the cessationist has every right to ask these folks (as opposed to themselves) to go through church history and show the alleged continuity of the gifts they believe in. If church history favors cessationism, the charismatic will have a hard time demonstrating this, as has already been proven by the number of alternative gift theories that have been advanced by charismatics in order to try and get around the church history issue. But we need to be honest in our scholarship. A church history argument is an experience argument and it does not serve the cessationist camp well to try and argue that it isn't, which Edgar unsuccessfully tries to do here.
Andromathris
Dr. Edgar's work is refreshing for those of us who are cessationists. He shows from the Bible that the spiritual gifts were meant for a particular time in church history, that they are not necessary for a full Christian life, and that the gifts today are clearly not the same as in the New Testament. His treatment of the material is fair, and his integrity is of the highest caliber. His scholarship is outstanding, and his knowledge of the Greek is impressive. I know this personally, as he is my professor at present. The only flaw in the book is that one might not like the coversational writing style.