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by Stanley J. Grenz

eBook Beyond Foundationalism: Shaping Theology in a Postmodern Context download ISBN: 0664257690
Author: Stanley J. Grenz
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; First Edition edition (March 8, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 298
ePub: 1240 kb
Fb2: 1679 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Theology

Stanley J. Grenz was Pioneer McDonald Professor of Theology at Carey Theological College in Vancouver, British . Theology is formed into a whole in the sphere of community. Since we are beyond foundationalism, the much needed basis for theological discourse is the Church.

Stanley J. Grenz was Pioneer McDonald Professor of Theology at Carey Theological College in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada,and Professor of Theological Studies at Mars Hill Graduate School in Seattle, Washington, prior to his death in 2004. He authored a number of books, including What Christians Really Believe & Why; and Sexual Ethics: An Evangelical Perspective.

In part one there are two basic goals: first, to set the stage for doing theology in a postmodern context; and second, to show what impact foundationalist epistemological commitments have had on doing theology in the modern context. The authors begin with a brief description of the theological fragmentation in both its liberal and conservative expressions.

Description: In Beyond Foundationalism, Grenz and Franke offer a revolutionary methodology for doing theology in a postmodern age. Writing to both mainline and evangelical theologians, they propose a new theological method that uses three sources: the Spirit, speaking. Writing to both mainline and evangelical theologians, they propose a new theological method that uses three sources: the Spirit, speaking authoritatively through the biblical text; tradition, providing a historical interpretive framework; and culture, as context for constructive theological reflection

Theology of Women in Ministry (with Denise Muir Kjesbo; IVP), Revisioning Evangelical Theology: A Fresh Agenda for the 21st Century (IVP), and The Millennial Maze: Sorting Out Evangelical Options (IVP).

Find sources: "Stanley Grenz" – news · newspapers · books · scholar .

Find sources: "Stanley Grenz" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (January 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Stanley James Grenz (1950–2005) was an American Christian theologian and ethicist in the Baptist tradition. 20th Century Theology: God & the World in a Transitional Age with Roger Olson, 1997. The Social God and the Relational Self: A Trinitarian Theology of the Imago Dei, 2001

This article is a critical but appreciative response to the emerging theology and proposed theological method of Stanley J. Grenz.

Beyond Liberalism and Fundamentalism: How Modern and Postmodern Philosophy Set the Theological Agenda. This article is a critical but appreciative response to the emerging theology and proposed theological method of Stanley J. It is appreciative of the way that Grenz is helping evangelicals face the fact that they should be more engaging of the broader theological discussions regarding method if it is to avoid becoming hopelessly irrelevant, both within and beyond evangelicalism.

Stanley James Grenz (January 7, 1950 in Alpena, Michigan – March 12, 2005 in St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver) was an. . Paul's Hospital, Vancouver) was an American Christian theologian and ethicist in the Baptist tradition. YouTube Encyclopedic. The Social God and the Relational Self: A Trinitarian Theology of the Imago Dei, 2001

By Stanley J. Grenz and John R. Franke. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 2001. author {Craig Baron}, year {2004} }.

In Beyond Foundationalism Stanley Grenz and John Franke move past the absolute foundationalism of the Enlightenment and modern period to offer a revolutionary method for doing theology in the postmodern age. Writing to both mainline and evangelical traditions, they propose a ne. Writing to both mainline and evangelical traditions, they propose a new method that views theology as arising out of the interplay of the spirit which speaks authoritatively through the biblical text; tradition, which provides a historical interpretive framework; and culture, which gives context for constructive theological reflection.

Grenz and Franke provide a methodological approach for doing theology in the postmodern world. They propose a theological method that takes seriously the Spirit, tradition and contemporary culture, while stressing trinitarian structure, community and eschatology.

The authors move past the Enlightenment foundational approach to offer a revolutionary methodology for doing theology in a postmodern age. Their method uses three sources: the Spirit speaking authoritatively through the biblical text, tradition providing a historical interpretive framework; and culture as context for constructive theological reflection.

Comments: (7)
Thetalas
The doctrine of the Trinity is used to construct theology in Grenz and Franke's book, Community is how this theology is made into a whole, and Eschatology is how this theology is arranged into a definite position.

Trinity. To begin with, while it is acknowledged that the doctrine of the Trinity is not part of the kerygma of the Church or Scripture, Christian theology is trinitarian in nature. It is a "natural outworking of the faith of the NT community" (172). Far from philosophical speculation, the doctrine "arose as a response to the concrete historical situation encountered by the early Christian community" (173). Firm believers of monotheism and that Christianity was the fulfillment of Judaism, early Christians were faced with the task of integrating their three commitments to this God, his Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, and the Spirit who indwelt them. "They did not want to posit three Gods" (174), but they were captive to their experiences and left with the task of communicating their theological commitments. Moving forward, apart from a brief "hiatus generated by the Enlightenment" the doctrine of the Trinity has been an engaging "theological conversation throughout the history of the church" (186). Following Karl Barth, whose great accomplishment it was to "argue conclusively that the Christian community's primary experience of revelation is trinitarian in nature" (189), a truly trinitarian theology, therefore, is shown to be one "that is structured around the self disclosure of the triune God as centered in Christ and given through scripture to the believing community" (190). It is the experiential components of Christianity that reveal it to be a religion that is trinitarian in nature, and this architecture should serve the Church in constructing its theology.

Community. Theology is formed into a whole in the sphere of community. Since we are beyond foundationalism, the much needed basis for theological discourse is the Church. It is the community of the redeemed, those who have encountered the God of the Bible in Jesus Christ, who provide the basis for articulating the mosaic of Christian belief (233). In what amounts to social contract theory with an ecclesial recasting, i.e. the Church is entered into by believing, the Church is then constitutionally defined anthropologically. But this constitution may be defined theologically as well, since the believing community is formed by the Spirit at work in the narratives of Scripture. The narrative also provides the interpretive framework as it functions dynamically for the narrative believing community (226), and as this community participates in the life of the triune God through the agent of the Holy Spirit, it receives more of God's fulness (228). "The church is basic in that our participation in the faith community calls forth theological reflection" (234).

Eschatology. However, this community is oriented eschatologically, and this is the third point for Grenz and Franke. "Eschatology orients Christian theology because of the connection between eschatology and the narrative of God at work in creation" (252). The biblical narrative that the believing community inhabits is itself inherently eschatological since it has as its goal the restoration of creation. This is the telos toward which it is directed.
Xisyaco
EXCELLENT ITEM AND TRANSACTION
invasion
Great resource for school
Binthars
This book got here around the time that it was estimated to arrive. This book has been dynamite in helping to grasp the theologies of the Bible. It's easy to understand and I enjoy reading it more than any of my other text books.
Ylonean
This is a required book my university class but it would be a good addition for any religious study library. Grenz is very through
Uaoteowi
The book were deliever in a timely manner. Only had one problem had a page tore out but other than that I loved to book.
Mettiarrb
This was a tough read-- very theoretical and philosophical and sometimes convoluted. I found the lines of reasoning confusing and sometimes contradictory. Although many sections of the discussion are very well done, conclusions often do not seem to follow from the arguments.
Authors are attempting to arrive at a set of principles for doing theology in the present "postmodern" era, but stop at articulating the principles without really offering concrete examples of how those principles would be properly applied. That is, they give no examples of the final theological ideas that would emerge from applying these principles. Thus, although I sensed they are laying the groundwork for a further agenda, it is not clear to me what it is. The devil is in the details-- the specifics-- and this book is short on specific applications of the principles it offers. I found myself agreeing on many of their broadly stated summary points, but suspicious at many other points that they are simply preparing to repackage conservative, evangelical, "Bible-believing" dogma in some new lingo-wrapping the old in a lot of smoke-and-mirrors talk about the new.
I found value in the surveys of recent and current theological perspectives and conceptual development presented with each topic.
Rather than moving "beyond foundationalism"-- a proposition I find somewhat dubious-- the authors might actually just be offering a new set of foundations that are not all that different from some of the old ones. In particular, they seem to accord the Bible ultimate authority. While I think they make some good points, I don't think they have identified the principles that can move Christian thought toward more integrity and relevance. Too much head and not enough heart and soul.
A bit one-sided when studying all avenues of Christianity. Not a favorite that I plan to keep when the class is completed.