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by Vine Deloria Jr.

eBook Evolution, Creationism, and Other Modern Myths: A Critical Inquiry download ISBN: 1555911595
Author: Vine Deloria Jr.
Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing (October 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1655 kb
Fb2: 1846 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf txt mobi lit
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Theology

Lists with This Book. Vine Deloria argues that the Evolution theory has many holes in its argument, that it has replaced the old dogmatic emotional religious perspective of universe with the so-called modern emotional evolution perspective of the universe.

Using the tension between evolutionists and creationists in Kansas in the late 1990s as a focal point, Deloria takes Western science and religion to task, providing a critical . carousel previous carousel next.

Using the tension between evolutionists and creationists in Kansas in the late 1990s as a focal point, Deloria takes Western science and religion to task, providing a critical assessment of the flaws and anomalies in each side's arguments. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. The Metaphysics of Modern Existence.

In short, Deloria clearly demonstrates that creationism, evolutionism and every other theory or myth of our origins is not and cannot truly be rigorous science.

Deloria takes Western science and religion to task in this witty and erudite assault on the current state of evolutionary theory, science, and religion. In short, Deloria clearly demonstrates that creationism, evolutionism and every other theory or myth of our origins is not and cannot truly be rigorous science.

by: Vine Deloria, Jr. Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing. Print ISBN: 9781555914585, 1555914586. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to Evolution, Creationism, and Other Modern Myths: A Critical Inquiry. eTextbook Return Policy

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Vine Victor Deloria Jr. (March 26, 1933 – November 13, 2005) was a Native American author, theologian, historian, and activist. He was widely known for his book Custer Died for Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto (1969), which helped attract national attention to Native American issues in the same year as the Alcatraz-Red Power Movement

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Deloria takes Western science and religion to task in this witty and erudite assault on the current state of evolutionary . Native American spiritual elder offers his critiques of both Biblical Creationism and the Theory of Evolution, concluding (of course) in favour of a traditional Aboriginal interpretation of the world's origins.

Vine Deloria, Jr. (March 26, 1933 – November 13, 2005) was an a Native American author, theologian, historian, and political activist from the . Evolution, Creationism, and Other Modern Myths: A Critical Inquiry. Golden, CO: Fulcrum, 2002. (March 26, 1933 – November 13, 2005) was an a Native American author, theologian, historian, and political activist from the Yankton Sioux tribe of South Dakota. He became one of the most prolific writers on American Indian rights and culture with nearly 25 books and hundreds of articles.

Deloria, . Jr. Excerpted from Custer Died lor Your Sins: An Indian Manifesto. NY, Macmillan, PP. 1-27. 158. MariJo, M. A conversation with Vine Deloria, Jr. about evolution, creationism, and other modem myths: a critical inquiry: MariJo Moore asks Sioux author Deloria to shed new light on ancient truths // New Life Journal, Oct. 10, 2003. Retrieved May 05, 2005 from.

An overview of the debate over creationism and evolution discusses such topics as animal intelligence, ancient astronauts, and sacred rocks.
Comments: (7)
Kigabar
Unfortunately much of what Deloria wrote in this book ten years ago has now been updated by science and research. So the book is not "right", and Deloria has passed so he can't update it (I'm sure he would have, he was willing to shift his views in the light of new evidence).

Still, this book is valuable and worth reading today. He makes many accurate critiques of how science does what it does, and just as many of how religion does what it does. The answer to the question of "evolution or creation or something else?" still eludes us. This book marks a milestone along the path to figuring out this huge puzzle.

Deloria's genius wanders. You'd have to take his whole body of writing and cut and paste it into topics that develop slowly enough for most of us to get his train of thought. But here are a couple trains I picked out:

Native understanding is willing to tolerate both a scientific perspective and a religious (mythological) perspective AT THE SAME TIME! One example of this is where Deloria tells about some early reports of natives of different tribes meeting for the first time. The tribes would tell each other their stories including their creation myths. One tribe might say that the world was created by two deities, another tribe might say one. One tribe might say it was created as an accident from something the deities were doing unrelated, another tribe might say it was created deliberately. Hearing views different from their own did not infuriate them. It enriched them. They felt richer by having more perspectives!

The message is, perspectives need not exclude one another. Neither is science "right" and religion "wrong," nor the other way, according to Deloria.

Gems like this make each of Deloria's books worth reading and re-reading.
Thetalas
I was looking for more direct history and myth tales directly from the American Indian point of view. Mr. Deloria is a very intelligent man and gives a truly great description and understanding of the western view. Just not what I was looking for.
BORZOTA
I have red most of Vine Deloria's books, my favorite being God Is Red. I read most of them 15 years ago and loved them. I think if I had read this one back then I would have loved it and given it five stars here. But I have spent the past five years reading A LOT about evolution and the Creationism/Intelligent Design "controversy" and then I read this book that, at least by its title, seemed to offer a bridge or at least something fresh on the subject. But like many reviewers here I have found the great Vine Deloria a total flop with this subject, and this book a crashing disappointment. This book reads pretty much like the "creationist" attacks on science and the theory of evolution I have read from the Christian fundamentalists. Neither he nor they want to take the time and effort to really understand what the theory really is, and what scientific thinking and method is. Instead he resorts to straw-man attacks on scientists, saying they are as "faith-based" as religious people. I would have believed this ten years ago; now that I have taken the time to study the subject I simply cannot buy it, sad to say.
Shadowbourne
DeLoria is an author I have always respected, and there is much in this book to praise, but the presentation of some views and his critique of them is clearly biased and designed to promote a postmodern view of science and culture in which fables, stories and legends are equally as valid as results reached through experimentation and testing in science.

His treatment of evolutionist theory and scientists who defend evolution is fraught with ad hominem attacks, sarcasm, nastiness and rhetorical questions. His references to evolutionist theorists such as Stephen Gould characterize them as "self-appointed high priests of evolution" and the like; on the other hand theologians and ID theorists get "the great Swedish theologian...", "the great German theologian...", or "respected theorist Behe..." (a totally scientifically discredited creationist).

Why? Because attacking evolution theory, attacking even Western creationism and religion, paves the way to give equal credit with science to non-Western legends, fables, and oral history. To paraphrase many jurists who say of oral contracts, such "science" is not worth the paper it's printed on.

Now, I have written articles and made presentations arguing DeLoria's point from my own perspective -- I DO believe there is much in Non-Western oral history and culture that presages modern science, and much that can be gained by melding western and non-western views, especially for ecological studies. What I object to is the constant sarcasm and lack of respect for scientists who hold views that DeLoria clearly disagrees with -- skip the snotty attitude and personal attacks (which do not exist even for the western creationist/Christians he also clearly disdains). If it's a synthesis he's after, such attacks are not going to further it.

But his treatment of religion studies, history, and so forth are quite good -- I just can't get past the aforementioned nastiness, which is totally unnecessary and counter-productive. I would have expected more from an author whose previous works I so admired.
Kifer
I purchased this book with the hope of getting the native american viewpoint on the subject, and hopefully a different perspective. Instead, the author just restates creationist arguments about evolution, and restates scientific arguments about creationism, and he does not do a good job with either. He seems to think that cherry picking phrases from quotes is all that is needed to prove his points. Most disappointing was the tiny amount of space devoted to native american thoughts on this issue.