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eBook Triune Atonement: Christ's Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation download

by Andrew Sung Park

eBook Triune Atonement: Christ's Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation download ISBN: 0664233473
Author: Andrew Sung Park
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press (January 27, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1320 kb
Fb2: 1130 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mobi docx rtf
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Theology

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Andrew Sung Park writes with clarity and grace about a more cohesive theology of atonement and Christ's . We are all sinners as well as sinned against.

Andrew Sung Park writes with clarity and grace about a more cohesive theology of atonement and Christ's life and mission on earth. His description of the role of the Paraclete is also wonderful, and brings to life the Paraclete as a discernible, breathing presence. Even the most noble among us cannot escape belonging to worldly systems - governments, institutions, etc. - that cause us to sin, knowingly and unknowingly. Who among us does not have a cross word for someone occasionally?Not only does the church as an institution need a theology.

It opens the door for further investigation into the application’s potential as a teaching tool for trauma victims, nontraditional applications of the craft, its ability to aid in the recovery process, and the potential risk and benefit victims have from such work being done and from creating such pieces themselves.

The book surveys historical views but also proposes that the atonement be seen as the death of Christ for both victims and the oppressed, for sinners and oppressors, for the whole creation-including animals and nature

The book surveys historical views but also proposes that the atonement be seen as the death of Christ for both victims and the oppressed, for sinners and oppressors, for the whole creation-including animals and nature. This 'triune atonement' refers to the involvement of the Trinity in the atonement, here presented from an Asian American perspective. Triune Atonement: Christ's Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation (9780664233471) by Andrew Sung Park. This "triune atonement" refers to the involvement of the Trinity in the atonement, here presented from an Asian American perspective. Presbyterian Publishing Corporation.

Triune Atonement: Christ's Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation, Westminster John Knox, 2009 . Park, Andrew Sung (1985), Minjung and P'ungryu theologies in contemporary Korea : a critical and comparative examination, P.

Triune Atonement: Christ's Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation, Westminster John Knox, 2009, ISBN 0-664-23347-3. dissertation, Graduate Theological Union, OCLC 14507504. Espinosa, Gastón (2011), "Response to Andrew Sung Park", in Recinos, Harold Joseph (e., Wading Through Many Voices: Toward a Theology of Public Conversation, Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 174–177, ISBN 978-1-4422-0583-3.

From Hurt to Healing: A Theology of the Wounded. Triune Atonement: Christ’s Healing for Sinners, Victims, and the Whole Creation. Louisville: Westminster John Knox. Jesus the Liberator: A Historical Theological Reading of Jesus of Nazareth. Maryknoll: Orbis Books. Sousa Santos, B. 2009. If God were a Human Rights Activist: Human Rights and the Challenge of Political Theologies. Online ISBN 978-1-137-31182-5. eBook Packages Palgrave Religion & Philosophy Collection. Personalised recommendations.

Park thinks that the concrete healing of the victims and the victimizers in this world is rooted in the ongoing . Regarding the latter, a weakness in Park’s book is in his treatment of the Triune Atonement in connection to the han of animals and nature.

Park thinks that the concrete healing of the victims and the victimizers in this world is rooted in the ongoing, post-resurrection work of the Spirit of the Risen Christ. The Paraclete knows han well because s/he, as part of the Trinity, was united with Jesus and experienced his life, crucifixion, and resurrection.

This is a study of the atonement, the meaning of the death of Jesus Christ. The book surveys historical views but also proposes that the atonement be seen as the death of Christ for both victims and the oppressed, for sinners and oppressors, for the whole creation--including animals and nature. This "triune atonement" refers to the involvement of the Trinity in the atonement, here presented from an Asian American perspective.

Comments: (6)
Black_Hawk_Down
The book provides a useful historical overview of various Christian interpretations of the meaning and importance of the crucifixion; the salvation work of different aspects of the Trinity is explained, as reflected by each interpretation. Strengths and weaknesses of each interpretation are analyzed. Park then presents another interpretation of the subject, one which he clearly thinks holds up to scrutiny better than the others. One might consider Park's interpretation to be more comprehensive in many ways. While the members of my book group were not wholly won over to Park's views, we found merit in many of his statements. His book definitely stimulated more thought and conversation than many other inspirational books we have read.
Mr.jeka
It's clear that Park is writing from a liberation theology perspective and the strength of this approach is to highlight a vision of the atonement that speaks to the poor and the oppressed. It frees them from the double bind of "the pain of suffering itself and the pain of theological condemnation" (p. 70). This is where the book shines.

Another very interesting bit comes at the end where he speaks of how the atonement applies to animals and nature - an aspect that gets overlooked in almost all other atonement theories.

However, while I appreciated Park's attempt to move beyond the situation of the oppressed and deal with the atonement for oppressors (something many liberation theologians fail to do), the book falls apart a bit here. For one thing, I find it problematic that there is a one view of the atonement for the oppressed and another view for the oppressor and no attempt at synthesis between the two.

Overall, seeing the atonement from an Asian/liberation perspective opens up the conversation in a fresh and challenging way.
Ger
A very good and thought-provoking book from an author with an Asian perspective. He gives a helpful overview of traditional atonement theories, noting what he believes their strengths and weaknesses are. He then articulates a helpful distinction between the oppressors/sinners versus the oppressed/sinned against, and how the work of Christ speaks to each. A fairly comfortable read with minimal complicated language.
Ishnsius
If I were told I could use only one book (in addition to the Bible) to explain Christianity to someone, this would be the book. Andrew Sung Park writes with clarity and grace about a more cohesive theology of atonement and Christ's life and mission on earth. His description of the role of the Paraclete is also wonderful, and brings to life the Paraclete as a discernible, breathing presence.

We are all sinners as well as sinned against. Even the most noble among us cannot escape belonging to worldly systems -- governments, institutions, etc. -- that cause us to sin, knowingly and unknowingly. Who among us does not have a cross word for someone occasionally?Not only does the church as an institution need a theology that addresses both, we as individuals need one as well. Anything else falls short of being complete because it does not address us as our full selves and we are forever doomed to struggle to balance the conflicts within us. Andrew Sung Park's approach is the first I have ever encountered that embraces the whole person in our dual roles. The conflicts mostly diminish rather than disappear, but Park gives us grace, which leads to repentance, which leads to more grace.

Newer approaches to psychology suggest that we as people have multiple dimensions to our personality, more of an ebb-and-flow of different parts than the traditional fixed "tier" of Freudian psychology. (Pamela Cooper-White's "Many Voices" is a good place to find an explanation.) Mr. Park's work becomes even more interesting -- and, I think, credible -- when brought together with these newer psychological constructions. His theology has room for all our parts.

He writes with wonderful grace and love. This book is a joy to read, and put real joy in my heart. I found myself loving and talking to the Paraclete just as I love Christ.

Might I add that I have always loved and felt a deep connection to nature; Dr. Park's chapter on Creation brought my love and connection to a higher and more meaningful sphere that continues to grow. For one thing, though I had been inching closer for a long time, it gave me the gentle push I needed to cross the threshold and become a vegetarian. Many people do so because they love animals, and certainly this is a part of it for me; but Dr. Park's work lead me to an honest repentance of my failings with those with whom we share the earth; when God calls, I strive to answer "yes." The Bible is a constant story of God saying "Will you?" and humanity's answer. Park asks "will you be a part of God's plan for Creation," and I answered yes. I repented for my naivete and rationalizations about my relationship to animals.

Where true repentance steps in, grace also enters, and, once I made my promise to God never to again harm an animal for my own benefit, the change was instant. I was subsequently lead, again, through grace, to encounter scientific works that taught me the many benefits of a plant-based diet. Again, the change was instant and swift. I never looked back, and it has unquestionably saved my life and health. Grace in action.

But beyond that very powerful commitment to change, I now experience nature in a much heightened way. It is how I experience God, and, although I think I was a rather kind person before, it has made me even kinder and more empathetic. I cherish the time I spend with animals and nature. I see the light of God pouring through it and I feel a part of that light. It is transcendent.

Few books effect change on that experiential level. Many theology books can change our thinking, our "head," but it takes a sincere, visionary, and may I say, earnestly humble voice -- a voice that rises out of the author's profound experience -- to change a reader's life on such a hands-on, dimensional level. This, this is what pastoral theologians are all about. To make our own experiences authentic, we need to pay more attention to them, not the popular voices that promise "believe and prosper."

Perhaps the "threat" of becoming a vegetarian or vegan will send you running from this book. Suck up your courage and read this generous and wise book anyway. It dispels a lot of misconceptions that are out there, and I think non-believers might come away without the intent of conversion, but perhaps a respect for what Christianity is about. Dr. Park makes a strong case for every point he makes. A pastor of mine once quoted someone else's popular book whose catch-phrase was "Your God Is Too Small" (or something like that). Mr. Park shows us how our interpretations over the years have constrained our concept of God, and how large God truly is.

Amen.
Kekinos
Inspring read, praise God for Dr. Andrew Park and his work!
BlackHaze
I'm almost finished with this book. I will say that this is the first book on the atonement that explores all of the theories of the atonement that I have read, which is very rare. Just in that, this book is a must read.