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by Gerd Ludemann,Frank Schleritt,Martina Janssen

eBook Jesus After 2000 Years: What He Really Said and Did download ISBN: 1573928909
Author: Gerd Ludemann,Frank Schleritt,Martina Janssen
Publisher: Prometheus Books; New Ed edition (May 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 707
ePub: 1781 kb
Fb2: 1226 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Theology

Unique in its comprehensiveness, JESUS AFTER 2000 YEARS covers the canonical gospels, as well as the more recently discovered Gospel of Thomas and apocryphal Jesus traditions

Unique in its comprehensiveness, JESUS AFTER 2000 YEARS covers the canonical gospels, as well as the more recently discovered Gospel of Thomas and apocryphal Jesus traditions. Ludemann concludes with a short life of Jesus in which he pieces together in narrative form what can be known about Jesus based on the historical evidence. Also included is an index of all authentic sayings and actions of Jesus. JESUS AFTER 2000 YEARS is not a secondary survey of the work of others, nor does it take a thematic approach.

JESUS AFTER 2000 YEARS is not a secondary survey of the work of others, nor .

JESUS AFTER 2000 YEARS is not a secondary survey of the work of others, nor does it take a thematic approach. Rather, all the extant traditions of Jesus from the first two centuries are retranslated, after which their historical accuracy is investigated in a way that even the educated lay reader can follow.

by Gerd Ludemann, Frank Schleritt, Martina Janssen 2012 ISBN-10 . This major book may be regarded as Gerd Liidemann's magnum opus, summing up as it does the result of 25 years' study of Jesus of Nazareth.

by Gerd Ludemann, Frank Schleritt, Martina Janssen 2012 ISBN-10: 0334027764, 1573928909 704 pages PDF 12 MB. It is dominated by the question: what words and actions attributed to Jesus must be regarded as the result of legends which formed at an early stage, and what can in all probability be regarded as genuine? Here is no secondary survey of the work of others, nor a thematic approach.

Jesus After 2000 Years book. It is widely recognized by New Testament scholars that many of the.

Unique in its comprehensiveness, Jesus After 2000 Years covers the canonical gospels, as well as the more recently discovered Gospel of Thomas and apocryphal Jesus traditions

Unique in its comprehensiveness, Jesus After 2000 Years covers the canonical gospels, as well as the more recently discovered Gospel of Thomas and apocryphal Jesus traditions. Lüdemann concludes with a short life of Jesus in which he pieces together in narrative form what can be known about Jesus based on the historical evidence. For all those with an interest in Christian origins, this volume is an invaluable resource.

Book InformationJesus after 2000 years. Book InformationJames. Wisdom of James, disciple of Jesus the sage

Book InformationJesus after 2000 years. What he really said and did. By Gerd Lüdemann. Pp. viii + 695. Paperback, £30, 0 334 02776 4. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. Wisdom of James, disciple of Jesus the sage. Two thousand years of custom have perhaps-dulled our sense of wonder at this; but it would surely have been otherwise for a first-century Jew who was told that he ought to worship a Galilean artisan as he worshipped Yahweh.

Jesus After 2000 Years. Published May 2001 by Prometheus Books.

Jesus After 2000 Years: What He Really Said and Did. Gerd Ludemann; Frank Schleritt; Martina Janssen. Jesus nach 2000 Jahren : was er wirklich sagte und tat. Lüdemann, Gerd, Frank Schleritt und Martina Janßen: Published by zu Klampen Verlag; (2004)

Jesus After 2000 Years: What He Really Said and Did. Published by Prometheus (2001). ISBN 10: 1573928909 ISBN 13: 9781573928908. Lüdemann, Gerd, Frank Schleritt und Martina Janßen: Published by zu Klampen Verlag; (2004). ISBN 10: 3934920489 ISBN 13: 9783934920484. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books. The chapter devoted to John's gospel was contributed by Frank Schleritt, and Martina Janssen did the one on apocryphal traditions.

Messiah: A Philosophical Overview of the Quest for the Historical Jesus (Raymond Martin). Heythrop Journal 42 (4):495-498 (2001).

It is widely recognized by New Testament scholars that many of the sayings and actions attributed to Jesus in the gospels cannot be factually traced to him. The gospels, written many decades after the death of Jesus, are composites of hearsay, legends, and theological interpolations, reflecting the hopes and beliefs of the early Christian community more than the actual teachings of the Galilean prophet.Despite these difficulties, Gerd Lüdemann shows in this fascinating analysis of early Christian documents that the tools of historical research can succeed in reaching at least a close approximation of some of the original words and deeds of Jesus. Unique in its comprehensiveness, Jesus After 2000 Years covers the canonical gospels, as well as the more recently discovered Gospel of Thomas and apocryphal Jesus traditions. Lüdemann concludes with a short life of Jesus in which he pieces together in narrative form what can be known about Jesus based on the historical evidence. Also included is an index of all authentic sayings and actions of Jesus. For all those with an interest in Christian origins, this volume is an invaluable resource.
Comments: (7)
Kirizan
This is an exemplary book that provides critical analysis of the texts of the gospels and provides a scholarly judgement on the sources, authenticity of the sayings and actions (i.e. whether plausibly real, or a literary creation) and other background. This is for the reader who wants to get beneath the surface of the text.
Bluddefender
The final word of the controversial author on his favorite subject.
Sat
A bit dense at times, but an exhaustive review of the Gospels as history (or, for the most part) non-history. It is difficult after 2000 years to get a clear picture of the "real" Jesus of Nazareth, but I think that this book makes a good effort at separating the man from the myths.
Prorahun
The author is one of the arrogant Ph'ds who thinks he's infallible. He covers the material in great depth and has some excellent insights if he could only get over himself.
Doukasa
Gerd Lüdemann (born 1946), is a German scholar who taught New Testament from 1983 to 1999 at the University of Göttingen. After complaints from churches, his Chair of New Testament was renamed the "Chair of History and Literature of Early Christianity"; his research funding was also cut and his teaching was no longer part of the curriculum. He has also written books such as What Really Happened to Jesus: A Historical Approach to the Resurrection,Virgin Birth?: The Real Story of Mary and Her Son Jesus,The Great Deception: And What Jesus Really Said and Did, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 2001 book, "This book sets out to fill a gap in theological literature... The historical-critical research into Jesus which has been developed for around 250 years may have become the standard for scholars, but it has hardly been able to command a general consensus... Consequently uninitiated readers get the impression that research is unplanned, full of contradictions, and is going nowhere. This leads them either to sink into resignation or to hold even more firmly to a faith which is above historical questions. Yet neither resignation nor uninformed faith make sense... So it seems to me that a historical stocktaking of critical concern with the central person of Christianity, Jesus of Nazareth, which has been the business of scholars... is long overdue... My plan is to offer a new translation of the most important extant traditions about Jesus in the first two centuries and then to investigate their historical credibility, in such a way that educated lay people, too, can follow the argument." (Pg. vi)

He states, "It is very probable that Jesus called a group of twelve during his lifetime. Were we to regard this group as a post-Easter creation, it would be difficult to explain why it disappeared again immediately after its institution... Moreover, the existence of Judas as one of the twelve suggests the historicity of the group of twelve in Jesus' lifetime. For who would have invented the existence of Judas who delivered up Jesus as a member of the group of twelve had this person not been historical?" (Pg. 22)

He observes, "Jesus' success in his home town was slight. We may infer as a historical fact that the designation of Jesus as 'son of Mary' was already used against him in his home town. The phrase is then to be designated as a taunt which puts a finger on a sore spot in Jesus' descent... the father of Jesus is not mentioned at this point because there is doubt about who his real father it. Had Jesus been a physical son of Joseph, the expression 'son of Mary' would never have found its way into an early Christian text. The phrase 'son of Mary' is so shocking that only Mark has the courage to repeat it." (Pg. 40)

He states "How did the 'virgin' have Jesus as a child if Joseph is not the father? Here Jewish polemic speaks clearly and at the latest in the second century relates that Mary had an affair with the Roman soldier Pantera... this seems to be on the right lines. However, we must rule out a sexual transgression on the part of Mary... since in that case Joseph would hardly have taken his fiancée Mary to himself. Moreover we should note that ... her presumed age at the time of the betrothal (between twelve and fourteen) make a sexual adventure highly improbable. Therefore---shocking as this may seem to begin with---we are driven to assume the rape of Mary as a likely explanation of this dark stain on her history and that of her son Jesus." (Pg. 123)

It notes, "Anyone who is in search of the historical Jesus will not find him in the Gospel of John. For the Fourth Gospel has already left far behind what Jesus really said and did... Certainly John contains some historically reliable information about Jesus: for example, that he comes from Nazareth (1:45), that he had disciples and brothers (2:12; 7:3)... But apart from such general information... a critical analysis of the Gospel of John leaves hardly anything for the historical Jesus." (Pg. 416) [NOTE: This chapter was written by Frank Schleritt, not Lüdemann.]

Lüdemann's opinions are obviously controversial, but his arguments are important to study for anyone investigating the historical Jesus... whether one agrees with him or not.
Runeterror
If you liked The Five Gospels, you'll love Jesus After 2000 Years.
Gerd Luedemann is a scholar based in Germany who participated in the Jesus Seminar and recently came out as a non-Christian (explained in his book The Great Deception). Having read five of his books, I must say that "Jesus After 2000 Years" is my favorite and the one that I have found the most useful. It is not more popularizing pablum on the historical Jesus. Rather, it is a critical commentary on the ancient texts: the Gospel of Mark, the Gospel of Matthew, the Gospel of Luke, the Gospel of John (by Frank Schleritt), the Gospel of Thomas, and the Apocryphal Jesus Traditions (by Martina Janssen). As Luedemann says in the preface: "My plan is to offer a new translation of the most important extant traditions about Jesus in the first two centuries and then to investigate their historical credibility, in such a way that educated lay people, too, can follow the argument."
The format of the book is brilliant. Each section begins with a fresh translation of the text; for example, the first is Mark 1.1-8, starting with "Beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ." Those portions of the text that apparently belong to the creation of the gospel writer are presented in italic text. Following the translation is a section on "Redaction and tradition." In this section we find commentary on the meaning of the text, such as "This sums up the whole Gospel of Mark, which sets out to be the gospel of Jesus Christ." Finally, there is a section titled "Historical" in which the value of the tradition for reconstructing history is presented, such as, "John the Baptist practised baptism for repentance by the Jordan; by it the sins of those being baptized will be forgiven on the day of judgment, which is imminent." Occasionally there is a section on "Later revision," such as on John chapter 19, "Verse 35 is clearly an addition by the revisers," followed by arguments for that conclusion.
This is not the kind of book that is meant to be read from front to back. As a commentary, it is best used as a reference work whenever you are studying a particular passage in the gospels. This commentary is distinguished by its critical approach and emphasis on the question of historicity.