carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Serving with Eyes Wide Open: Doing Short-Term Missions with Cultural Intelligence

eBook Serving with Eyes Wide Open: Doing Short-Term Missions with Cultural Intelligence download

by David A. Livermore

eBook Serving with Eyes Wide Open: Doing Short-Term Missions with Cultural Intelligence download ISBN: 0801066166
Author: David A. Livermore
Publisher: Baker Books (April 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1836 kb
Fb2: 1932 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi mbr txt lrf
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Ministry and Evangelism

Short-term mission trips are great ways to impact the kingdom. Yet they can lack effectiveness because of mistakes or naiveté on the part of participants.

Short-term mission trips are great ways to impact the kingdom. In this insightful and timely book, David A. Livermore calls us to serve with our eyes open to global and cultural realities so we can become more effective cross-cultural ministers. Serving with Eyes Wide Open is a must-have book for anyone doing a short-term mission or service project, whether domestic or overseas

Livermore’s repeated admonition to do short-term missions with a long-term view might hint that he also still feels this way.

Feb 22, 2010 Tara Kram rated it it was amazing. I wish all of my fell Staff members would read it. I think Livermore’s CQ grid is super helpful. Livermore’s repeated admonition to do short-term missions with a long-term view might hint that he also still feels this way. Serving with Eyes Wide Open is a must-have book for anyone doing a short-term mission or service project, whether domestic or overseas. Foreword by Paul Borthwick. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

About David Livermore: DAVID LIVERMORE, P. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of David Livermore's books.  .

Short-term mission trips are a great way to impact the kingdom. yet they can lack effectiveness because of mistakes or naivete on the part of participants

Short-term mission trips are a great way to impact the kingdom. yet they can lack effectiveness because of mistakes or naivete on the part of participants. In Serving with Eyes Wide Open, David A. Winner of an Outreach Resource of the Year award in global outreach from Outreach magazine, Serving with Eyes Wide Open is a must have book for anyone doing a short-term mission or service project, whether domestic or overseas

The Cultural Intelligence (CQ) Difference - Продолжительность: 1:55 David Livermore Recommended for you.

The Cultural Intelligence (CQ) Difference - Продолжительность: 1:55 David Livermore Recommended for you. 1:55. Just For Laughs - 10 Funniest Pranks (7) - Продолжительность: 15:47 Km Music Recommended for you.

Great Usable Book for Doing Missions with Cultural Intelligence. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. While there are times that it feels like Livermore is implying that short-term missions are more harmful than helpful (which he repeatedly says is not his view), the basic thesis that we should be thoughtful, careful, and aware while doing cross-cultural missions is absolutely correct. For those who want to have a global perspective on life and a realistic view of culture and its influences, this is a very good "primer".

Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. In this insightful book, David A. Winner of an Outreach Resource of the Year Award in global outreach from Outreach magazine, Serving with Eyes Wide Open is a must-have book for anyone doing a short-term mission or service project, whether domestic or overseas.

More than one million people participate in short-term mission projects outside of North America every year-and millions more are involved in domestic cross-cultural missions right here at home. This is encouraging news. But the work is not done. There are weaknesses in our approach and practice. And these volunteers need resources to help them prepare for effective cross-cultural engagement. Serving with Eyes Wide Open helps Christians understand the changing face of Christianity and how that affects short-term missions. In three parts, author David A. Livermore will take a broad look at what the twenty-first-century church is doing on the mission field, the assumptions people make about Christianity, and what it takes to adapt effectively to new cultural contexts. Perfect for all who engage in short-term missions trips-either at home or abroad-Serving with Eyes Wide Open will equip readers to serve more sensitively.
Comments: (7)
Fearlesshunter
In this book, David Livermore forces me to face and struggle with some extremely important questions, as I prepare for a possible cross-cultural medical mission. Some of these questions I would have never thought of on my own: What are ALL of my motives for wanting to go, and how many of them are grubby self-serving, rather than being about a desire to serve others? How much arrogance - "Western Civilization superiority" - oozes out of my very pores? What are my deeply-hidden assumptions and agendas? Livermore makes a good case for asking such questions, and has pushed me, pretty hard, against the wall of my integrity, forcing me into honest and necessary self-examination in advance of a 3-month mission. From this standpoint, I can recommend this book, with praise.

On the other hand, however, Livermore is so severely critical of his fellow Westerners and of the doubtful-to-poor results of their short-term cross-cultural missions that there have been times when - discouraged and pretty-well beaten up by Livermore - I have nearly given up my intention and effort to volunteer myself for any mission at all. Readers need to know this before taking on this book. Livermore is not enthusiastic about Americans going on short-term (especially 2-3 week) missions, so be forewarned.

When I pull back from the text itself and it's psychological impact, I find myself wondering if Livermore has not spent so much time looking at his fellow Americans, in particular, through the eyes of those on the receiving end of "mission beneficence" - a valuable and startling perspective, by the way, even for those who have traveled abroad a good deal - that his own thinking has become overly jaundiced by long exposure to the narrowly-informed, culturally-biased, anti-Americanism so pervasive around the globe. American ex-pats, global nomads, and study-abroad students often suffer from this subtly creeping form of "perception contamination," wherein anything critical that non-Americans say about the United States or its people gets granted unquestioned credibility, as the overseas American bends over backward to fit in and to avoid being judged as a stereotypical "Ugly American." Sadly, it would seem that Livermore fails to fully recognize, in himself and in his non-American contacts, the lack of the very kind of "Cultural Intelligence" and cross-cultural tolerance he purports to teach, for instance, in his Great Courses lecture series, "Customs of the World: Using Cultural Intelligence to Adapt, Wherever You Are."

All in all then, while I think that the self-examination this book forces readers to undertake can be crucial, going forward, in preparing for missions, I must also warn others that Livermore's writing can seem a lot like an unnecessarily harsh, even unfair, anti-American assault ... by an American expert in this field who probably needs to examine and evaluate his own post-missions perceptions, judgments and attitudes.
LeXXXuS
This book provides meaningful insight into need to approach new cultures with "eyes wide open." Explanations and examples seem very appropriate for a person considering mission ministry in foreign countries. Caution re: imposing our worldview/experience on different cultures is am important reality when preparing for mssion service. Excellent resource for those considering mission service.
Ricep
I have lived in four different countries and visited many more, but this book really opened my eyes to the ways I could be more sensitive to the cultural differences. I really enjoyed the section where he asked short term missions worker what they thought they had accomplished and compared their answers with with the answers of the people in the country visited. Eye-opening! As so many want to serve abroad, this is a good book to be more thoughtful and more helpful to the places where we go. Marla
Reighbyra
Good book. Helpful discussions, raises important (albeit uncomfortable) questions. Readers who give up on the book before making it to the end may think that the author is trying to discourage short-term missions, but if you muscle past those challenging issues introduced in the beginning, you realize that he is merely pushing us to do it better. No mission group will be worse off for reading it, but may be worse off in the long run for not reading it (or something like it). There is a helpful warning stated at various points about drawing generalizations of a people group based on limited exposure, but at points I felt that the author was guilty of this very thing. That did not discredit the book, it merely illustrated how difficult the habit is to break. One statement caught my attention and warned me about swallowing some of the research "hook, line, and sinker." He mentions the practice of McDonalds in Nepal, but there is presently no McDonalds in Nepal, and I cannot seem to find any history of McDonalds ever being in Nepal. I do not believe that the author intends to deceive with this misinformation, only that he has perhaps been misled by the research of others. Nonetheless, I have been helped by the book, and I believe others will as well. I notice that there is an updated edition available, and perhaps some of the shortcomings I noticed in the book have been addressed in the new edition.
Daiktilar
This book came as a recommendation from friends who also do missions. I enjoyed the cultural awareness this book provided as well as the important message that we are not to go and push our agendas on the countries we are working in. I took away some valuable information from this book that I was able to apply when I did missions.

At times the wording was a bit hard to follow - I did take enough away to make this a good purchase and a recommended book.
Runeterror
This book really helped me reconsider why we do short-term mission trips. it helped me realize that I don't always have the right attitude during mission trips and that I need to be more culturally intelligent. Though there were some opinions from the author that I disagreed with or found to be exaggerated, I still learned a lot from the book, and I am very glad that I read it.
Dilkree
I read this book in conjunction with two other books: When Helping Hurts, and Churches That Make a Difference. All three are great (and if you have the time to read all three, there is a real synergy between the three that will make it worthwhile.) But anyone who is planning on going on a short-term mission project or who has leadership in a church/school/organization that sends people on such projects MUST read this book. Too often our short term mission projects are counter-productive. Livermore suggests a number of ways to make sure that we aren't doing more harm than good. This is a must read.