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eBook Giving Church Another Chance: Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices download

by Scot McKnight,Todd D. Hunter

eBook Giving Church Another Chance: Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices download ISBN: 0830837485
Author: Scot McKnight,Todd D. Hunter
Publisher: IVP Books; Print-On-Demand edition (February 16, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 190
ePub: 1521 kb
Fb2: 1613 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit mobi azw lrf
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Ministry and Evangelism

I've had Giving Church Another Chance in my possession for a while now. I have meant to read it before, but for . Giving Church another Chance might be the first step you or someone you know needs to get back on that track of formation

I've had Giving Church Another Chance in my possession for a while now. I have meant to read it before, but for myriad reasons haven't gotten around to starting it until recently. I'm almost inclined to say the timing for this read was providential considering that I read three-quarters of the book during a snowstorm that knocked out power and had us locked in to our home for a few days. Giving Church another Chance might be the first step you or someone you know needs to get back on that track of formation.

Giving Church Another Chance book. Todd D. Hunter, Scot McKnight. Giving Church Another Chance: Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices. by.

Giving Church Another Chance' by Todd Hunter is at once . University of Nottingham) is professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, Illinois.

Giving Church Another Chance' by Todd Hunter is at once autobiographical, confessional, and even a little theological. Hunter discusses nine practices that he terms as follows: going to church and. Bishop Todd D. Hunter (DMin, George Fox University) leads the church-planting initiative Churches for the Sake of Others (C4SO), a diocese of the Anglican Church in North America.

Everybody is looking for a rich spiritual life. Church Another Chance : Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices.

book by Todd D. Hunter. 2011 Golden Canon Leadership Book Award winner! Everybody wants to be spiritual. But nobody wants to be religious. Giving Church Another Chance : Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices.

Todd Dean Hunter (born 1956) is an American author, church planter, and bishop in the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). He was the founding pastor of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Costa Mesa, California (2009-2019)

Todd Dean Hunter (born 1956) is an American author, church planter, and bishop in the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA). He was the founding pastor of Holy Trinity Anglican Church in Costa Mesa, California (2009-2019). Prior to being received into Anglicanism in 2009, Hunter was a leader in the charismatic Vineyard movement. He has also been affiliated with a number of evangelical movements and organizations during his career, including the Jesus Movement, Calvary Chapel, and Alpha.

Giving Church Another Chance. Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices. As a pastor, Todd Hunter found himself disillusioned, burned out and needing to drop out of traditional forms of church. by Todd D. Hunter Foreword by Scot McKnight. Giving Church Another Chance. He experimented with house churches and other options but was still dissatisfied. Eventually he found himself sneaking off to worship services on Sunday mornings with surprising results. What did the historic spiritual practices of church do for him?

Everybody wants to be spiritual.

Everybody wants to be spiritual. Everybody is looking for a rich spiritual life  . With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

Giving Church Another Chance: Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices. The Monkey and the Fish: Liquid Leadership for a Third-Culture Church. What Scott Boren does in this book is this: he gives you forty days of short readings and exercises that, if done faithfully and adventurously and with openness to God’s promptings, will lead you to the influence a follower of Jesus is meant to have. In fact, these readings could lead to substantive changes in your life and career. They certainly could lead you to do things you never dreamed of doing but are so glad you did.

Hunter, Todd D. Other Authors: McKnight, Scot. Subjects: Spiritual life Christianity. Spiritual Disciplines Handbook : Practices That Transform Us. by: Calhoun, Adele Ahlberg. Soul Repair : Rebuilding Your Spiritual Life. by: VanVonderen, Jeff. Spiritual Theology : A Systematic Study of the Christian Life.

Published by InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, Il. ww. vpress. Hunter (. in

Published by InterVarsity Press, Downers Grove, Il. in. George Fox University) leads Churches for the Sake of Others, a church-planting initiative of the Anglican Mission in the Americas. He is also a teacher, writer and consultant for his ministry, Society for Kingdom Living, which helps pastors and lay leaders reach a generation that has been disenfranchised from the church.

2011 Golden Canon Leadership Book Award winner! Everybody wants to be spiritual. But nobody wants to be religious. Everybody is looking for a rich spiritual life. But nobody is looking to church. As a pastor, Todd Hunter found himself disillusioned, burned out and needing to drop out of traditional forms of church. He experimented with house churches and other options but was still dissatisfied. Eventually he found himself sneaking off to worship services on Sunday mornings with surprising results. What did the historic spiritual practices of church do for him? How did they lead to a life of centered peace, chart a path to simplicity and cause him to reach out to others while focusing on the glory of God? Walk with Hunter on this journey to find spiritual riches in a surprising place. You might just give church another chance.
Comments: (7)
Hulis
This will be different style of book review than I normally write; it's more of a confession.

I've had the privilege of following Todd Hunter's spiritual journey closer than most people. I was a part of the Vineyard Church movement when Todd became the National Director after John Wimber's passing. From my perspective Todd was at his best when he was given an opportunity to share about the Kingdom and mentor younger leaders. I was personally disappointed when he resigned as I was hoping to be mentored by him while he was in this role.

Todd's next couple of jobs actually brought him physically closer. He and his family moved to Eagle, Idaho, a bedroom community right outside of my hometown of Boise. He soon went to work for Alpha Ministries, leasing out office space right across the road from our church. On many days I'd see Todd pacing up and down the sidewalk, talking on a phone headset and gesturing with his hands like the young leader on the other end of the line was right in front of him.

Many times I desired to walk across the street and have lunch with Todd. I didn't, mostly out of judgment. I had been convinced that Todd was a quitter, that he had settled, that he was suffering a mid-life crisis and that he had taken his hands off the plow. I had bought into the idea that the para-church ministry he was involved in was of less value to the Kingdom than the building we worked in on the other side of the street. (Do you know how sad I am to have to admit this?)

Fast forward a few years and now Todd and I have practically switched places--I am outside of the institutional church and Todd is an Anglican Bishop. Go figure.

Recently I've had a chance to sit down with Todd as he shared his journey with a group of us over dinner. It answered some questions I had for him, but found I still had several more. When I heard that he had penned a new book titled, Giving Church Another Chance: Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices, I was interested. Though I was resistant to read a "Do Not Forsake The Assembling Of Yourselves Together" commentary, knowing Todd, I doubted that was what he had written. I assumed, having let go of of those previous judgments, that Todd was in a healthy place to write a book of this nature, and I was in a healthy place to listen. I was correct in my assumption. Here is what he shares of this journey:

"I did not intend any of this history. Neither did I approach any of it with premeditation. It just unfolded before me. And I feel in no way victimized by it. I have no complaints, I hold no grudges, and there are no chips-at least that I can see-on my shoulder. At this point in my life, I essentially have positive memories and appreciation for everything each tradition and each group gave me. The message here is not that everything and everyone in my past was wrong, and now I have found the right church."

With that expression of healthiness and humility, I was glad to pick up this book.

Ultimately, Giving Church Another Chance, is much more about the subtitle "Finding New Meaning in Spiritual Practices" than it is about joining a traditional congregation. Todd's observations about life in the Kingdom truly come from a Big C church perspective, not just a local church viewpoint. I appreciate his observations, his passion, and his candor. He discusses the value and purpose behind many of the spiritual disciplines. Great food for thought and practice.

My local church life does differ in form that Todd's does these days, but with his mission I have no qualms.

"We are not trying to get people to follow a certain form of church but are trying to help them follow Jesus for the sake of others. The goal of leadership and the goal of our churches is that people discover the spiritual practices of church as a way of learning to follow Jesus."

It's nuggets like that quote that make me glad to still have Todd's influence in my life. This chapter of his journey, and his reflections on the ones he has already finished, are definitely worth processing.
Gianni_Giant
"...practice your way to faith." Those are some of the closing words to this remarkably simple, yet profound book. I've had Giving Church Another Chance in my possession for a while now. I have meant to read it before, but for myriad reasons haven't gotten around to starting it until recently. I'm almost inclined to say the timing for this read was providential considering that I read three-quarters of the book during a snowstorm that knocked out power and had us locked in to our home for a few days. The accompanying solitude and quiet lent itself to an almost perfect environment to absorb and digest the sweet and nurturing words that Todd Hunter shares on repracticing the disciplines of the Church.

I do not know Todd personally, but I have learned about him through the stories of others and from the information he has shared about his biography. It seems to me that he stands in small company with a group of people who are uniquely qualified and gifted to share the story he tells this book. Todd has been exposed to a very diverse experience within the Protestant church family, not only as a participating member, but also in the top levels of leadership. His perspective, experience, and wisdom are shared with pastoral gentleness and Christ-like humility. I found my emotions, both physical and spiritual, stirred throughout my reading experience having memories recalled from my own life as well as sensing a longing in my soul to participate in repracticing these ecclesial exercises.

The book is nine chapters not counting the introduction and conclusion, and just short of two-hundred pages. Todd has included a notes and references section at the end of the book and he also includes a group study guide as well. His outline and process through the book is quite clever as he follows the basic liturgical movement of a weekend mass or worship service (check the amazon.com site for an inside look of the TOC for a closer look).

While I enjoyed the book as a whole, I was especially moved by several chapters. Chapter five; "Hearing Sermons" was rather convicting to me. I am a pastor, a leader in the church; I have been involved with the Christian faith in some aspect or another for over forty years. I know intellectually and spiritually that church is about Jesus Christ...or should be and that it is not solely about me or my needs. Knowing this and practicing it is a different story. Too often I find myself taking the role of an ecclesiastical version of Siskel and Ebert acting as a couch critic for all things church and worship service related. I don't like that I do this, but even if I keep my mouth shut, my subconscious is still measuring and grading all that goes on during a Sunday morning. Opening myself up to the insight Todd Hunter shares might help me to engage in "hearing the sermon" from a less narcissistic perspective and engage in a more corporate attitude.

Chapters six through eight were also very meaningful to me, helping to recenter and align some of the outward expressions of faith through the practices and disciplines of the church. Specifically, Hunter addresses Liturgy as A Lifestyle of the Work of the People, Giving an Offering (tithing) as Simplicity of Life, and Taking Communion (Eucharist) as a Life of Thankfulness. Each of these chapters were nothing new to me, but they were gentle and firm reminders that were helpful in showing area where I might have become lax in my practices.

The conclusion of the book is indeed a summation of the purpose of the entire book; Putting the Spiritual Practices of the Church to Use. A quote out of the book from Henri Nouwen might be a good way to end this review; "The goal of education and formation for the ministry is continually to recognize the Lord's voice, his face, and his touch in every person we meet." This then, is what the spiritual practices of the church help us to learn. Giving Church another Chance might be the first step you or someone you know needs to get back on that track of formation. This book is great and easy to read...simple and profound.