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eBook Translating the Devil: Religion and Modernity Among the Ewe in Ghana (International African Library): Religion and Modernity Among the Ewe in Ghana (International African Library) download

by MEYER.

eBook Translating the Devil: Religion and Modernity Among the Ewe in Ghana (International African Library): Religion and Modernity Among the Ewe in Ghana (International African Library) download ISBN: 074861303X
Author: MEYER.
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (1999)
Language: English
Pages: 291
ePub: 1654 kb
Fb2: 1309 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Ministry and Evangelism

Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 1999. ix. 265 p. maps, tables, appendix, notes, glossary, bibliography, index.

Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press, 1999.

The main argument is that, for the Ewe, involvement with modernity goes . Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute, 1999. 074861303X, 9780748613038.

The main argument is that, for the Ewe, involvement with modernity goes hand in hand with new enchantment, rather than disenchantment, of the world. At the grassroots level, the study focuses on the image of the Devil, which the missionaries communicated to the Ewe through translation and which currently receives much attention in the Pentecostal churches.

This practice is outlined in Birgit Meyers Translating the Devil: Religion and Modernity Among the Ewe people of Ghana. JOURNAL DATABASE: Westermann, D. Ewe Africa: Journal of the International African Institute 8 (1935): 548-550. In her book she reveals that occasionally people were openly accused of witchcraft and required to submit themselves to an ordeal. If found guilty, they had to pacify their victims and undergo a purification ritual in the course of which adze was taken away from them. Though this option existed, it isnt attempted all too. Riley 2 often and the Ewe people simply spoke of Adze in hush tones, and feared being its next victim.

The Journal of African History. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1999. The Journal of African History.

This book offers an ethnography of the emergence of a local Christianity and its relation to changing social, political and economic formations among the Peki Ewe in Ghana. Focusing on the Evangelical Presbyterian Church, which arose from encounters between the Ewe and German Piestist missionaries, the author examines recent conflicts leading to the secession of many pentecostally oriented members, which it places in a historical perspective. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserve. more). Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge.

Translating the Devil is Birgit Meyer’s published PhD dissertation submitted to the University of Amsterdam in 1995. Pietist Protestant Christianity was introduced among the Peki Ewe by German missionaries from the Norddeutsche Missiongesellschaft (NMG). This book, essentially on the anthropology of evil, examines the appropriation of Christianity in an African context. Meyer’s thesis is informed by Weber’s allusion to ‘the gap between ocial theological doctrine, with its monotheistic orientation, and people’s actual religious praxis with its emphasis on demons’ (p. xx).

Citation: Rosenthal, Judy (2000). Translating the Devil: Religion and Modernity among the Ewe in Ghana. American Ethnologist 27(3). ISSN: 0094-0496, 1548-1425.

Translating the Devil by Birgit Meyer, 1999, Edinburgh University Press for the International . Translating the Devil. religion and modernity among the Ewe in Ghana. Prefer the physical book? Check nearby libraries with: WorldCat.

Translating the Devil. Published 1999 by Edinburgh University Press for the International African Institute in Edinburgh. Religion, History of doctrines, Devil, Ewe (African people), Church history.

Translating The Devil book. This book offers an ethnography of the emergence of a local Christianity and its relation to changing social, political and economic formations among the Peki Ewe in Ghana.

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