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by Sally S. Wright

eBook Publish and Perish (Ben Reese Mystery) download ISBN: 1590528492
Author: Sally S. Wright
Publisher: Multnomah; First Edition edition (June 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 300
ePub: 1790 kb
Fb2: 1842 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr mobi txt docx
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

PUBLISH & PERISH (Acad/Trad Mys-Ben Reese-Ohio-Cont) – Good Wright, Sally S. – 1st in series .

Publish and Perish (Ben Reese Mystery). I enjoyed this second academic mystery in the archivist Ben Reese series. Code of Silence (Ben Reese Mysteries (Severn House)). Watches of the Night (Ben Reese Mysteries). Archivist Reese is in Scotland helping to appraise his friend's treasures when he's asked to investigate the murder of a parson who was stung by bees contained in a picnic basket he was given, and then died. It's a cerebral mystery, once that unfolds slowly and methodically.

Sally Wright is the author of six Ben Reese mysteries: Publish And Perish, Pride And Predator, Pursuit And .

Sally Wright is the author of six Ben Reese mysteries: Publish And Perish, Pride And Predator, Pursuit And Persuasion (a Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan. Poe Award Finalist in 2001), Out Of The Ruins, Watches Of The Night (published in June 2008) and Code Of Silence, a prequel to the series (published in December 2008). Wright was born obsessed with books, and started pecking-out florid adventure stories with obvious endings by the time she turned seven.

A Ben Reese Mystery, Book 1. By: Sally S. Wright

A Ben Reese Mystery, Book 1. Wright. Narrated by: Daniel Dorse. Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins. Categories: Mysteries & Thrillers, Historical. Now author Sally Wright introduces to the Christian marketplace an intriguing new mystery series which follows the adventures of archivist Ben Reese, an expert in rare books, coins, paintings, ancient texts, and documents. A former intelligence agent and commando in WWII, Reese - who is also a Christian - repeatedly must extricate himself from dangerous situations, both at home and abroad, in each of the stories in this mystery series.

Sally Wright's Publish and Perish is the first in the Ben Reese mystery series, and is a book any lover of well written mysteries should purchase. It's true: If you're a fan of the modern, hard-hitting, and action-packed mysteries that now abound, this may not be the series for yo. hereas many of the newer writers resort to Hollywood-style scenes and cardboard characters, Sally Wright turns her eye to the struggles of the human soul.

Sally Wright is a graduate of Northwestern University, where she earned a degree in oral interpretation of literature. Ms. Wright is the author of Publish and Perish, the debut of the Ben Reese series, and Pride and Predator. She has also completed graduate work at the University of Washington. Библиографические данные. Pursuit and Persuasion Ben Reese Mysteries Series (Том 3), Sally S.

American archivist Ben Reese takes up the dangerous challenge that starts out with a sixteenth-century stabbing and .

American archivist Ben Reese takes up the dangerous challenge that starts out with a sixteenth-century stabbing and incorporates elements of falconry, tire making, microbiology, and book collecting before Georgina's hidden poems eventually help him find the killer. - This book has been nominated for an Edgar award by the Mystery Writers of America. That's the premise of this pleasant third entry in Sally Wright's Ben Reese series (Publish and Perish, Pride and Predator) and unlikely as it may be, she makes do with it more than adequately.

In her fourth Ben Reese mystery, Edgar nominee Wright takes Ben away from England and Scotland, the settings for the last two books, and deposits him on unspoiled Cumberland Island off the coast of Georgia. It's 1960, and Cumberland faces an uncertain future as developers and park service scouts try to convince key families to sell their property.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Publish and Perish by Sally Wright .

Now Ben's own life is on the line as he investigates the professional jealousy and unchecked pride that led to murder in Publish and Perish. Sold bymanyhills (20168)100. 0% positive FeedbackContact seller. Publish and Perish by Sally Wright - 1997 Softcover 1576730670 Multnomah. Pre-owned: lowest price.

Publish and Perish (Ben Reese Mystery) by Sally S. Elisa Brock. Publish and Perish (Ben Reese Mystery) by Sally S. What others are saying. Hope to Die (Alex Cross Series Book. Not a lot of mystery but I've read every other Alex Cross book so I think I will read every new one that comes along. hope to die by james patterson Hope to Die (Alex Cross Series

Millions of mystery novels are purchased every year, and only the Bible has outsold the number of copies purchased of Agatha Christie's titles. Now, author Sally Wright introduces to the Christian marketplace an intriguing new mystery series which follows the adventures of archivist Ben Reese, an expert in rare books, coins, paintings, ancient texts and documents. A former intelligence agent and commando in WWII, Reese - who is also a Christian - repeatedly must extricate himself from dangerous situations, both at home and abroad, in each of the stories novel in this mystery series. In the first title, Ben is called away from a sabbatical in Oxford, England, to investigate the death of an eccentric, conservative professor who dies of a heart attack in Ohio moments after reporting that he has uncovered a terrible act of treachery. Now Ben's own life is on the line as he investigates the professional jealousy and unchecked pride that led to murder in Publish and Perish.
Comments: (7)
Froststalker
I listened to this entire book while driving all day yesterday. For the first 50 miles of listening I was looking for a place to pull over so I could look for another Audible book to listen to. The first voice I heard sounded like a very old man voice speaking at very low volume--even when I turned the volume way up. I had no idea who he was or what he was going on about except there was a phone call for somebody from America in the middle of the night.

Next, I realized, we were in somebody's kitchen where it sounded like the very old man was still talking. After listening another 10 minutes or so things started making more sense and I could sort things out. It wasn't until I reached my destination that I could read the first chapter on the Kindle version that I understood what the beginning of the book was about.

The reader does a good job with many of the voices--especially the Italian woman. However, I think he has chosen the wrong voice for a key character and for a couple of other minor characters. Sometimes I think he mixed up the character who was supposed to be talking with another character's voice.

The story is interesting and seems pretty authentic to the time and place. I haven't decided yet if I like Ben Reese all that much, but from other reviews by people who have read more books in this series I am reassured that he is a sterling character. Reassured enough to have ordered the next two hard copy Ben Reese books.

I give the Audible version two stars and the story 3-1/2 stars.
Preve
The line between genre fiction and literary fiction has become ever more thin and difficult to distinguish for me over the past decade. Publish and Perish permanently obliterates any such line, if it ever existed. Sally Wright's novels are literature in a time-honored tradition that isn't often practiced this well. I've now read three of her books, and they are in the ancient tradition called drama. Aristotle wrote that drama is action that seems to result from the characters' motives and choices. Shakespeare is the supreme writer of dramatic action in English. Wright's Ben Reese, the hero of her first six novels, is a Christian. So his motives have a specific moral impulse. He is a university archivist, meticulous and patient. And he is a former military intelligence agent, which has taught him to be insightful and circumspect. All that composes Ben's nature seems to cause the story to unfold as it does.

Without giving away too much or spoiling your enjoyment of the book, I'll provide some examples of Ben Reese's nature, the nature that drives his actions and this book. And I hope you'll notice that Wright's style is inventive and enjoyable. As Ben considers the death he is investigating, he thinks that he "...had never felt a conflict between [logic and meaning] and he doubted that [the victim] had either. Any more than either one of them had seen a conflict between reason and revelation." Ben relies as much upon his spiritual nature as upon his reason. He even offers his adversary every opportunity to find redemption, at the risk of his own life. Wright also employs an occasional Biblical allusion: "But then we don't see ourselves clearly. We squint around the beams in our own eyes, and gloat over the motes in our neighbors'." But she is never preachy, not even remotely; she is simply an artful storyteller. I think that even the most devout atheist will enjoy the intricacies of this book.

Ben Reese is the archivist at Alderton University, a small school in Ohio. So his approach to crime solving is governed by a certain mode of thinking: "It was part of Ben's general philosophy to mistrust speculation, to think that toying with any hypothesis in circumstances like that, when he didn't have any real data, was an irrational waste of time and energy." This methodical and composed turn of mind is unusual in detective fiction and makes Ben an absorbing character . Ben's approach is rigorous and fair-minded: we have mild ridicule of "students imposing Freud on The Wind in the Willows." (Although that is not one of Ben's lines; it is spoken by a character who knows that Ben will understand and have no sympathy with such sophistry.) The point is that Ben Reese is precise, fair, reasonable, and cautious. You'll have to read the book to appreciate fully the results that his methods bring.

The action takes place a decade and a half after D-Day. Ben's war experiences affect him, both in the numerous and severe scars he carries on his body and also in the way he thinks and behaves. After the invasion at Normandy, Ben worked as a behind-the-lines scout in France, not even attached to his own Army, out of touch with his own countrymen, and without the support any soldier comes to expect. So he is used to working in isolation, without a safety net. He sniffs out the culprit relying upon his own inspection of the evidence, as elusive as it is. One character observes, "`Course, I don't think most people under forty know how to take care of themselves. They haven't seen enough of what life can do." Ben is not quite forty; yet he has seen far too much of what life can do, and he does take care of himself, including keeping himself fit, which plays a role in the plot. Both his job as an archivist and his background in intelligence work come to bear as he carefully examines all the paperwork of the murder victim. This study is on-going through much of the book and finally yields its fruit.

Parenthetically, I'll mention another aspect of Sally Wright's command of her art, though it's an aside. In my review of her latest book, Breeding Ground, I mentioned an unusual manipulation of point of view. In Publish and Perish Ben receives a phone call; we hear only his side off the conversation. Then, quite a few pages later, we hear the voice of the speaker in that call. Now, we have the entire picture. Such inventive touches are prominent in Wright's prose.

Ben Reese's characteristics first lead him to believe that murder has been committed, when the evidence seems to indicate natural death. Then, he pursues his quarry in a very particular way. His choices of methods and the motives he has for choosing them seem to cause the story to unfold as it does. Actually, though, we know all along that the author is controlling everything. That's the alchemy that a fine writer performs when writing dramatic fiction. Sally Wright is not simply a writer of excellent mysteries, though she certainly is that. She is a serious novelist who has chosen this medium for her art.

Very highly recommended
John Pendley
Road.to sliver
Setting her story in 1960, Wright explores the ethical obligations of college faculty with regard to each other and to students. To post-1970's students, it will seem strange, indeed, to learn that in that period, consensual sexual interplay could be grounds for summary dismissal from the College. On the other hand, the bitterness toward a faculty member or Administrator by others within the same Community, who are blocked in their aspirations by too "fussy" a definition of performance standards is, as it has always been, part of the Academic situation.
It is into this background, that Wright places her hero, a wounded special services soldier, who has just heard of the death of his closest friends death.
The background, though treated with brevity, gives to the story an appealing setting. The plot line, sometimes overburdened, that is, too weak to justify actions related to it, mostly is serviceable, The characters, sketchily delineated, still are sufficiently human for us to identify them as recognizable people. The best friend, while having a kind heart, is seen to be locked into a rigid definition of his "duties" regardless of the misery he causes. Whether we will be led by the author to sympathize with him in death is an open question.
All in all, a light read which is successful as a story, for some it will not be successful as a moral tract.
Pryl
This was my first Sally Wright novel, and I enjoyed it thoroughly, both in terms of the suspense and the development of the setting and characters. Wright writes excellent dialogue that provides not only enjoyable reading, but insight into who these people are. Her characters are developed thoughtfully, and they do come alive on the page--always a plus, in a mystery or any other kind of fiction. As a former inhabitant of the academic cauldron in which this story takes place, I was especially interested in--and often amused by--the often arcane battles among the well-defined denizens of various departments and disciplines. The ending had me on the edge of my seat (figuratively speaking--I was reading in bed), and the result was clever and satisfying. I'm happy to have been introduced to Ben Reese and look forward to spending many more hours with him.