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eBook Beyond the Ordinary: Ten Strengths of U.S. Congregations download

by Cynthia Woolever

eBook Beyond the Ordinary: Ten Strengths of U.S. Congregations download ISBN: 0664226930
Author: Cynthia Woolever
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; 1 edition (January 5, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1706 kb
Fb2: 1180 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr lrf doc lit
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Churches and Church Leadership

Beyond the Ordinary book. Start by marking Beyond the Ordinary: Ten Strengths of . Congregations as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Beyond the Ordinary book. Congregational Life Survey, the largest project.

Beyond the Ordinary offers a provocative and helpful look at the internal dynamics of .  . - Jackson Carroll, Duke University Divinity School. Cynthia Woolever is Professor of Sociology of Religious Organizations at Hartford Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut. After examining each individual strength, Woolever and Bruce placed a special focus on the congregations who were in the top 20% of this strength to examine what the remaining 80% of congregations can learn from them. Overall, I enjoyed this book. I appreciated the focus on the positives and subsequent optimistic approach to the narrative.

This book describes the qualities that are evident in strong congregations and develops congregational applications from . She is coauthor of A Field Guide to . Congregations and Beyond the Ordinary: 10 Strengths of .

This book describes the qualities that are evident in strong congregations and develops congregational applications from those findings. Like the first book, it is helpfully illustrated with charts, graphs, and cartoons.

Author: Woolever, Cynthia ISBN 10: 0664226930. This book describes the qualities that are evident in strong congregations and develops congregational applications from those findings. Title: Beyond the Ordinary: Ten Strengths of . Congregations Item Condition: New. Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press ISBN 13: 9780664226930. Books will be free of page markings. Показать все 6 объявления с новыми товарами.

Beyond the Ordinary: 10 Strengths of US Congregations (book). American Congregations: Portraits of Twelve Religious Communities, America (book). Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2004. These guides provide an overview of congregations. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press, 1994. American Muslims: The New Generation (book).

Congregations, 2004, Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce, Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

If you know of a book or study not featured here, or your work using the US CLS was recently published, please contact us with a copy or citation of the work. Beyond the Ordinary: Ten Strengths of . Congregations, 2004, Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce, Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press. Congregations, 2002, Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce, Louisville, KY: Westminster Jon Knox Press.

This book describes the qualities that are evident in strong congregations . Author Bio. ▼▲. As a sociologist and consultant, she has over twenty years of experience working with congregations, judicatories, and seminaries. Congregations, both published by WJK.

Congregations at Walmart. If you want NextDay, we can save the other items for later. Yes-Save my other items for later.

PROMISE: FINDING STRENGTH IN YOUR CONGREGATION'S LOCATION by Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 49, pp 384-386; doi:10.

BEYOND THE ORDINARY: 10 STRENGTHS OF . CONGREGATIONS by Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce PLACES OF PROMISE: FINDING STRENGTH IN YOUR CONGREGATION'S LOCATION by Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce. Deborah L. Coe. Published: 1 June 2010. in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.

Sociologists Mark Chaves, Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce take commonly . Woolever and Bruce also debunk myths about congregations.

Sociologists Mark Chaves, Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce take commonly held assumptions. Outside my office door are boxes of free books and journals left behind by a recently retired professor. For example, they counter the typical notion that congregations grow because the majority of worshipers are inviting others to attend services. They find that visitors need a reason to return.

Results from the U.S. Congregational Life Survey, the largest project of its type ever conducted in the United States, have prompted this second book from Westminster John Knox Press authors Cynthia Woolever and Deborah Bruce. Their original work, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations: Who's Going Where and Why, explores the practices and activities of worshipers in more than 2,000 U.S. congregations, encompassing more than 300,000 worshipers across a representative sample of denominations and faith groups. This book describes the qualities that are evident in strong congregations and develops congregational applications from those findings. Like the first book, it is helpfully illustrated with charts, graphs, and cartoons.

Comments: (2)
Uttegirazu
This appears to be a research project that was refitted for the popular market. With one foot in both worlds, the book is lacking. As a research study, the authors only report percentages. These are some of the least powerful measurements. There does not seem to be any further statistical working of the figures. Furthermore, the factors measured are all feelings and opinions. There was no correlation studies to determine if indeed the people completing these surveys were actually successful. The authors made some linkages but I was unsure how they came to their conclusions. Finally, because it was a research study, there were some paragraphs derived from research world that might confuse the lay reader.

As a lay reader, I would not know how to apply this material to my congregation. Many factors are included in ten typical measurements of a congregation. The authors talk about the twenty percent of congregations that are strong but it is unclear what that means. Does it mean that the individual congregation should compare itself to their results (even when some factors such as "openness to social diversity..." has a score of 8%)? Does that mean the reader should take the totals and divide by five to figure out what 20% is? Furthermore, if I am reading this as a congregational leader, how can I apply the material to my situation. This project seems to be a beginning investigation that is not complete. The book needs more work in defining and describing the processes involved. There is no indication of how a "strong" congregation was described. Research that is not generalizable, is of little use to anyone. The authors should team up with a good social science researcher.
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Cynthia Woolever (of Hartford Seminary) and Deborah Bruce (of the Presbyterian Church-USA) present in "Beyond the Ordinary" the results of a major, nation-wide survey of congregations and church-members. The survey is unique in that it is intended to focus on the strengths of the various American congregations. To that end, ten strengths of American congregations are identified and explained, the inter-relationship between these strengths is explored, and the relationship (or lack thereof) between the particular strength and other variables (average age of the worshiper, size of the congregation, etc.) is explored. Each of the ten strengths is separately analyzed in its own chapter and the book includes an introductory chapter, concluding chapter, and several appendixes. The ten identified strengths include:

1. Growing Spiritually

2. Meaningful Worship

3. Participating in the Congregation

4. Having a Sense of Belonging

5. Caring for Children and Youth

6. Focusing on the Community

7. Sharing Faith

8. Welcoming New People

9. Empowering Leadership

10. Looking to the Future

After examining each individual strength, Woolever and Bruce placed a special focus on the congregations who were in the top 20% of this strength to examine what the remaining 80% of congregations can learn from them.

Overall, I enjoyed this book. I appreciated the focus on the positives and subsequent optimistic approach to the narrative. Speaking of the narrative, the writing style was easy and flowing, interspersed with charts, graphs, shaded boxes exploring "myths," and even cartoons illustrating points. The fact that the authors did address myths was appreciated by this reader as myths often become "quick fix" solutions ("if we'd only change our worship style...") that have little basis in reality. Also appreciated was the interrelationship between the various strengths.

The book does however leave me wondering about certain things. One problematic aspect is the methodology employed. Many of the questions appeared to be subjective in nature ("do you feel your spiritual needs are being met in your church"). While the authors did attempt to craft a question that tried to run the gamut from the large liturgical church to the small charismatic church, there are many avenues to "meet spiritual needs" that would have been helpful to me-quality of music, various aspects of preaching, length of worship service, etc. Furthermore, the manner in which the survey results were presented tended to confuse me. If a church that is strong in community involvement tends to lose members, why is it considered a strong-point? Why is it that congregations that place a strong emphasis on faith-sharing and evangelism tend to be shrinking congregations? Finally (and probably purposefully), few "answers" were provided in this book concerning the identification of a particular congregation's strengths and how best to capitalize on said strengths. Overall, I would recommend this book and also suggest the reading of "Surprising Insights from the Unchruced" by Thom Rainer to compliment "Beyond the Ordinary."