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eBook Who Is My Enemy?: Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam--and Themselves download

by Lee C. Camp

eBook Who Is My Enemy?: Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam--and Themselves download ISBN: 1587432889
Author: Lee C. Camp
Publisher: Brazos Press (October 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1196 kb
Fb2: 1679 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit mbr docx txt
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Christian Living

In Who Is My Enemy, ethics professor and author Lee Camp contrasts the typical American response to any threat with the clear teachings of Jesus

Must Christians and Muslims Be Enemies? Current discussion of Islam in America tends toward two polar extremes. On one hand is the notion that Christianity is superior to Islam and that Muslims are warmongers. On the other is the notion that all religions basically say the same thing and are peaceable. Lee Camp argues that both these extremes are wrong. In Who Is My Enemy, ethics professor and author Lee Camp contrasts the typical American response to any threat with the clear teachings of Jesus. The rationalization of gun-toting Americans who are protecting their country does not match up with the message we read in the New Testament.

Who Is My Enemy? is Lee Camp's treatment on the subject of Christian-Muslim relations, with special attention to American Christians. The book shines an introspective light into the soul of Western Christianity

Who Is My Enemy? is Lee Camp's treatment on the subject of Christian-Muslim relations, with special attention to American Christians. The book shines an introspective light into the soul of Western Christianity. Camp discusses the tradition of Islam, focusing on the concept of justification of war, and how the theology on war has developed since the founding of the religion by Muhammad

My reading of Lee Camp from this book, from his earlier book Mere Discipleship: Radical Christianity in a Rebellious World, and from listening to his podcast is that he fits within the realm of Christian theology known as postliberalism.

My reading of Lee Camp from this book, from his earlier book Mere Discipleship: Radical Christianity in a Rebellious World, and from listening to his podcast is that he fits within the realm of Christian theology known as postliberalism. As the name implies, postliberalism is post - that is, after or a response to - liberalism.

Furthermore, American Christians who would respond by means of violence to what they perceive as a threat in Islam are themselves closer-albeit unawares-to the Muhammad story than to the Jesus one. That the actual Islamic understanding of justifiable warfare is both more honorable and more coherent than the macho Rambo varieties on display in many American churches today only deepens the irony. For those familiar with Camp’s work, this is well-worn ground.

Title: Who Is My Enemy?: Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam-­and Themselves. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ Religion~~ Christian Life ~~ Social Issues.

Islam United States Christianity Relations Christianity and other religions Ethnic conflict Religious aspects Violence Political messianism. by written and illustrated by Charles Shaw ; with photographs by Reagan Bradshaw ; foreword by James A. Michener. Download book Who is my enemy? : questions American Christians must face about Islam-and themselves, Lee C. Camp.

Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam - And Themselves. Current discussion of Islam in America tends toward two polar extremes.

Who Is My Enemy? Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam .

Who Is My Enemy? Questions American Christians Must Face about Islam-and Themselves. Theologian and critically acclaimed author Lee Camp argues that both these extremes are wrong. He introduces Christian and Islamic views on war and peacemaking and examines Christian and non-Christian terrorism to help readers confront their own prejudices. This book shows readers how to respond faithfully and intelligently to Muslims in today's world as well as to the New Atheists who suppose that all religion is inherently violent. It provides balanced teaching on war and peacemaking, offering hope for reconciliation in a post-9/11 world.

He clearly believes Islam to be a threat, and dangerous. I recounted alternate interpretations, citing a prominent Muslim theologian in Jerusalem

He clearly believes Islam to be a threat, and dangerous. I recounted alternate interpretations, citing a prominent Muslim theologian in Jerusalem. He responded by saying he cares nothing about Muslimology. I don’t care what any Muslim may say about the Qur’an or Islam; I only care about the authoritative original texts, he said in effect. It just so happened that we were two doors down from the mosque on Twelfth Avenue in Nashville. About that time a young man entered the shop, who, from the looks of his apparel, was Muslim.

Current discussion of Islam in America tends toward two polar extremes. On one hand is the notion that Christianity is superior to Islam and that Muslims are warmongers. On the other is the notion that all religions basically say the same thing and are peaceable. Theologian and critically acclaimed author Lee Camp argues that both these extremes are wrong. He introduces Christian and Islamic views on war and peace making and examines Christian and non-Christian terrorism to help readers confront their own prejudices. Camp shatters misconceptions about religious violence, arguing that American Christians often opt for an ethic that has more in common with the story of Muhammad than with the story of Jesus. This book shows readers how to respond faithfully and intelligently to Muslims in today's world as well as to the New Atheists who suppose that all religion is inherently violent. It provides balanced teaching on war and peacemaking, offering hope for reconciliation in a post9/11 world.
Comments: (7)
Brajind
This book presented an interesting mix of philosophy and history comparing and contrasting Christianity and Islam. I do not know much about the Islamic texts and having finished this book, still don't know much about the Islamic texts. The author choses various quotes from both the Christian and Islamic texts but a few quotes out of an entire religious tradition is hardly a fair sampling for making an argument. I could probably find one quote from each religion that says all humans should slaughter each other and derive from those quotes that "both religions essentially say the same thing." (Which is not at all the central thesis of this book, just an example of skewed logic)

I do like that the book seemed pretty unbiased and avoided making value statements for or against either religion. As the book's main goal seems to be to compare and contrast, a simple conclusion is hard to pinpoint. I appreciated that the author leaves the evaluation and interpretation of data to the individual reader instead of coming out and saying "X is good and Y is bad" or some other such nonsense.

However, in my opinion, far too much of the book was wasted with personal stories about "this one Christian or Muslim I talked to said..." I understand that some readers want the human interest part and/or want to see the author's journey but coming from a scientific background, I prefer to get to the meat of the matter without all of the fluff.

Over all, I would prefer a philosophical or sociological primer/overview of each religion along with historical references to the interactions of the various followers of the two religions.
Malien
In Who Is My Enemy? Camp does an excellent job of comparing Muslim and Christian interrelationships and perspectives on war. A very enlightening exposition of how disciples of Jesus and Muhammad have interpreted and applied a Just War Theory through the centuries since Jesus walked the earth. A must read for anyone who wants to seriously examine their own views on Western vs. Middle Eastern rationale for waging or participation in war based on the teachings of Christ. Read with an open mind, this book could revolutionize the reader's view of the Muslim world and its citizens.
ndup
Through his analysis of the teachings of Jesus, the Just War tradition as it has developed in Christianity and Islam, combined with consideration of the current practices of (mostly)American Christians, Camp comes to the controversial conclusion that the practice of American Christians with respect to war has more in common with Muhammad's teaching than with Jesus'.

Camp's account uses many scholarly resources but is thoroughly accessible to non-experts. If you're willing to be challenged in your understanding of the Christian attitude of war or of Christian relations with Muslims, this book will be a good choice.
Maridor
You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free. Lee helps us understand our so-called "enemy." Having many Moslem friends and having lived in a predominately Moslem city in Africa I can really appreciate his observations.
Tiainar
Good read
Miromice
It seems ironic that sometimes truth that is so obvious is too difficult to accept. Many who call themselves Christians attempt to ignore or twist the clear teachings of Jesus regarding aggression. The childish knee-jerk response to any aggression or perceived threat is to attack. It takes a more mature, thoughtful response to do what may seem counterintuitive. Many of Jesus' teachings are indeed counterintuitive, yet ultimately the "right" thing to do.

In Who Is My Enemy, ethics professor and author Lee Camp contrasts the typical American response to any threat with the clear teachings of Jesus. The rationalization of gun-toting Americans who are protecting their country does not match up with the message we read in the New Testament. If we truly are using the Bible in any sense as a guide for our daily living and as a guide for our nation, our military actions around the world must appear selfish and imperialistic - but not Christian. We condemn terrorism but honor bombing freely.

The message in Who Is My Enemy will not likely be embraced by Americans. Nationalism and "just wars" have replaced even the pretension of Christianity. I stand with Lee Camp in his small but perhaps growing audience.
Quemal
If you find yourself questioning the Christian's place in war-making, this book will give you a historically grounded perspective beginning in the Sermon on the Mount and culminating in today's ongoing wars. The comparison to the evolution of perspectives and justification for violence in Islam is enlightening, fair-minded, and thought provoking. I would recommend this book to Christians who have a true desire to expand their minds in regards to the teachings of Jesus and the early church; as well as non-Christians who may be surprised by this honest and critical assessment of Christianity in warfare.
This was revealing and thought provoking; a book that needs to be read by any Christian who is wondering what to do about Islam.