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by Martyn Lloyd-Jones

eBook Joy Unspeakable: Power and Renewal in the Holy Spirit download ISBN: 0877884412
Author: Martyn Lloyd-Jones
Publisher: Shaw Books (March 7, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1367 kb
Fb2: 1267 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi mbr lrf txt
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Christian Living

Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit. The result is a classic call to submit afresh to the Spirit for power.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit

Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit. The result is a classic call to submit afresh to the Spirit for power, purity and assurance, while keeping our heads in the face of pitfalls that might distract or ensnare us. Get A Copy. This book is a must read for anyone wanting to seriously study the doctrine of the baptism in the Holy Spirit. If you want a well-rounded view of the subject, and want to learn from all sides of the debate, you cannot pass by "Joy Unspeakable". Lloyd-Jones is in a unique position to write on this topic since he is one of the most celebrated Reformed preachers of all time.

Joy Unspeakable book. Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that. Lloyd-Jones gives a thorough Biblical view of why the baptism (immersion into) of the Holy Spirit may be a second experience for some, and also explains, contra many pentecostal perspectives, why at the time there might not be a speaking in tongues initially, or possibly at all. This book has what is lacking in too many charismatic titles: exegesis!

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Joy Unspeakable: Power and Renewal in the Holy Spirit (Epub & Mobi).

JOY UNSPEAKABLE By: Martyn Lloyd-Jones Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 288 Vendor: Shaw Books Publication . Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit

JOY UNSPEAKABLE By: Martyn Lloyd-Jones Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 288 Vendor: Shaw Books Publication Date: 1985. Dimensions: . X . (inches) Weight: 11 ounces ISBN: 0877884412 ISBN-13: 9780877884415 Stock No: WW4412. Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit.

Lloyd-Jones' preaching style was therefore set apart by his sound exposition of biblical doctrine and his fire and passion in its delivery. -- (1984), Joy Unspeakable: Power and Renewal in the Holy Spirit, Kingsway. -- (1986), The Cross: God's Way of Salvation, Crossway. He is thereby known as a preacher who continued in the Puritan tradition of experimental preaching. A famous quote on the effects of Lloyd-Jones' preaching is given by theologian and preacher J. I. Packer, who wrote that he had "never heard such preaching  .

Joy Unspeakable : Power and Renewal in the Holy Spirit. by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Joy Unspeakable: Power and Renewal in the Holy Spirit (Epub & Mobi). File: ZIP, 575 KB. What Is an Evangelical? (Epub & Mobi). File: ZIP, 814 KB. The Sovereign Spirit: Discerning His Gifts (Epub & Mobi). File: ZIP, 382 KB. From Fear to Faith. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. How to Forgive Yourself: A Step by Step Guide to Forgiving Yourself and Letting Go of the Past.

Martyn Lloyd-Jones explores the assertion of John the Baptist that Jeus would baptize with the Holy Spirit. The result is a classic call to submit afresh to the Spirit for power, purity and assurance, while keeping our heads in the face of pitfalls that might distract or ensnare us.--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
Comments: (7)
Hiclerlsi
Martin Lloyd-Jones was a Welsh Protestant preacher described by the MLJ Trust as "influential in the Reformed wing of the British evangelical movement in the 20th century." Some in the Reformed camp rued that influence, especially after publication of the sermons here on baptism with the Holy Spirit:

"The family of the Rev. Martyn Lloyd-Jones did not do the Reformed faith any favor when they published his defense of this doctrine in Joy Unspeakable." The Presbyterian Reformed Church in America

"Jones' prescription for new life in the church is wrong, dead wrong. This book is a bad book." The Reformed Free Publishing Association and The Standard Bearer.

What did these Reformed stalwarts have against Lloyd-Jones and his unspeakable joy? For starters, Lloyd-Jones considered the experience of baptism with the Holy Spirit, as described in the book of Acts, to be both available and desirable for Christians today. That is a major departure from the standard Reformed position that the occurrences in Acts were one-off, once for all experiences that were not intended for and should not be desired by believers today. The book of Acts, they say, is "descriptive, not prescriptive" meaning that it describes unique circumstances in the first century church and does not establish any regulatory or normative principles for subsequent believers.

To the extent baptism with the Holy Spirit is recognized at all, it is subsumed within one's initial conversion, and is decidedly non-experiential. John MacArthur speaks for many Reformed leaders when he writes, "Each of us possesses the entire Holy Spirit from the time we repent and believe" and "Holy Spirit baptism is not an extra experience you need to seek; it is something you have from the moment you are saved." But that is not how Lloyd-Jones saw it. He wrote, "what is established beyond any doubt is that one can be a believer without being baptized by the Holy Spirit." (31.) As for the John MacArthurs who equate Spirit baptism with regeneration, Lloyd-Jones said that they "seem to me not only to be denying the New Testament but to be definitely quenching the Spirit." (141.)

Lloyd-Jones repeatedly points out the wide disparity between the Christian life as seen in the New Testament and the Christianity promoted and practiced by a large segment of the church today: "[W]e look at the new Testament church, we see this amazing life that was in it - this power, this joy, this abandon, this thrill, and we ask ourselves, 'Are we like that?' We then read the subsequent history of the church and ... [w]e see that there have been periods in the church like this present era when the church has been weak and lethargic and ineffective." (199.) Many, if not most, in the church today "cannot say that they rejoice in Him 'with a joy unspeakable and full of glory.'" (183.)

The current state of affairs is largely blamed on church leaders who interpret the New Testament through the reductionist lens of their own limited experience and, consequently, "reduce everything to the ordinary." (18, 74). Without delving into philosophies of knowledge and epistemology, Lloyd-Jones exposes the real problem as an Enlightenment era rationalism that now permeates much of Protestant theology. Modernism might be dead everywhere else, but it is alive and well in mainline Reformed churches.

No one mixed more philosophic rationalism into today's Christianity than Reformed philosopher Gordon Clark who substituted "Logic" for the Logos in John, Chapter 1, and read the opening verse as: "In the beginning was Logic, and Logic was with God, and Logic was God." Clarkian apologist John Robbins of the Trinity Foundation took this rationalism about as far as one could go with statements such as "truth always comes from propositions" and "the mind of God, that is, God himself, is propositional." If God is essentially logic and propositions, then the rational understanding of propositions becomes the ultimate spiritual experience.

While Clark and Robbins are at the extreme, the reduction of spiritual knowledge and spiritual life to logic, propositions and dogma is widespread. But mere orthodoxy is not enough. "It is not enough for us as Christian people to make sure that we are orthodox and to bemoan the statements that are made in the name of Christ that are denials of the Scriptural teaching. ... Are we - let us ask it again - are we rejoicing in the Lord Jesus Christ with a joy which is unspeakable and full of glory?" (231.)

Spiritual life, spiritual reality and unspeakable joy are described by, but are not found within, the propositional statements of Scripture. They come from Jesus himself: "You search the Scriptures thinking that in them you have eternal life; and it is they that bear witness about me, yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life." John 5:39-40. Commenting on this passage, Charles Spurgeon added, "You stop short at the Scriptures, and therefore short of eternal life."

Aside from giving the Rationalists a good poke in the eye, Lloyd-Jones recounts dozens of personal testimonies from prominent Christians throughout the ages who received direct, immediate, divine illumination of spiritual reality and who gave witness to their own rejoicing with joy unspeakable and full of glory. My one critique of Lloyd-Jones here is that while these witnesses recognized the Holy Spirit as active in their experiences, many did not attribute the experience specifically to "baptism with the Holy Spirit" as Lloyd-Jones does. Some of these witnesses were superb theologians and philosophers, such as John Owen and Jonathan Edwards, who placed their experiences within the context of a well-developed epistemology, theology and biblical exegesis. By lifting the experiences out of that context and linking them all to his own particular view of baptism with the Holy Spirit, Lloyd-Jones does something of a disservice to the works of these great thinkers and believers.

Moreover, as Lloyd-Jones himself acknowledged, the desire and search for spiritual experience can be fraught with personal and communal dangers. Owen and Edwards took pains to identify those dangers and to mark out the narrow path that leads to life. With that caveat, I recommend this book.
Yar
I am extremely happy that I bought and own this book. It's a good buy, with over 450 pages, and it seems to consist of twenty four sermons that Lloyd-Jones preached on the subject of The Baptism with the Holy Spirit. I say this because Lloyd-Jones died in 1981, but this book is copyrighted in 1984 by Lloyd-Jones' wife. Also, his grandson is the editor, and he also wrote an introduction.

In spite of the fact that this may be transcripts of sermons, it is very well written and easy to read and understand. So either the editor did a marvelous job, or Lloyd-Jones wrote out his sermons in addition to preaching them.

Now to content. I was for many years a member of a traditional Pentecostal church, and we were taught that the Baptism with the Holy Spirit was an event separate and usually subsequent to salvation and was always accompanied by speaking in tongues. After many years under this teaching, and being very well schooled in the arguments to back up the traditional Pentecostal teaching, a series of events of a very negative nature shook my faith in this type of church and caused me to almost "start over" in my Christian education. Through this journey, I studied the teachings of many non-Pentecostal preachers, teachers, and authors. One of my favorite teachers and authors is John MacArthur of Grace Community Church in California, who radio ministry is called "Grace to You." He is extremely prolific and a wonderful, thorough, and uncompromisingly scriptural teacher of the Bible.

Well John MacArthur wrote a book entitled "Charismatic Chaos" in which he gives a very good presentation of his positions: 1) that "miracle gifts," [speaking in tongues, interpretation of tongues, miracles, healings] ceased even before the end of the Apostle Paul's ministry and life and 2) that the Baptism with the Holy Spirit occurs now concurrent with salvation. In the early church, it came it stages, but MacArthur gives his reasons for that, and he does a really good job. Based on his book, I stopped praying in tongues, and became even more suspicious of people who say "The Lord told me . . . ." and who want to give me prophesies or operate in other "spiritual gifts." Still, I was not convinced that John MacArthur had the whole story, because I have not seen anything in the church during my lifetime that has come close to the Book of Acts. And I don't see anything in the Bible that says the church today should be different from then.

Now MacArthur also claims that Martin Lloyd-Jones is one of his "heroes." He uses quotes from him in his MacArthur commentaries. So when I discovered that Lloyd-Jones was a Calvinist (or Reformed) theologian, AND he believes that the Baptism with the Holy Spirit occurs separate and generally subsequent to salvation and that all the gifts of the Spirit can occur today, well this book was for me a "must."

And I am not disappointed. Lloyd-Jones gives his exegesis that the Baptism with the Holy Spirit occurs separate from salvation, it does not require speaking with tongues, it does not require accompaniment by any manifestation of the Spirit or any particular gift, it is not equivalent with sanctification, that gifts of the spirit or "manifestations" can be counterfeited, that there are many reasons to be cautious about manifestations, and much, much more. There are twenty-four chapters and twenty-four topics, and I have enjoyed them all. I especially appreciate the chapters showing that we have to be cautious when people claim that they have gifts of the Spirit.

Do I now have all the answers? No, not at all. In fact, I may have more questions than ever, but I believe that my love for, and knowledge of, Scripture is greater than ever. And so I'll keep on studying and searching and reading and researching, and I believe I'll get the answers eventually.

Finally, I am asking God to grant me the Baptism with the Holy Spirit as Lloyd-Jones defines and describes it, so I would have to say I found his presentation very persuasive.
Drelajurus
I must admit that when I first read this book, I was far too much on the side of many of those in the reformed tradition. While I hold to reformed theology and am grateful to God for opening my eyes to the importance of sound teaching and the doctrines of grace, I believe that apprehension and fear have hindered many from seeing that the Holy Spirit operates experientially as well as working objectively in our sanctification. There definitely is something to be said about experiencing a rich joy and overwhelming sense of peace that I hadn't experienced at my conversion. As for the gifts of the Spirit, I have never spoken in tongues or experienced any visible "extraordinary gifts', but I'm not closed to the possibility as some are. There has certainly been much fanaticism and extremely bizarre behavior from many in the charismatic movement, but Lloyd Jones makes it clear that the Holy Spirit is sovereign and also that the believer is never out of control if they are truly under the Spirit's influence. I suggest reading this book in a prayerful spirit and with a mind that is not closed or restrictive. As for me, I still respect teachers on both sides of this subject, but always seek to be balanced in my judgement.
Thetath
I gave this book four stars because I didn't agree with some of the exegesis that Lloyd-Jones gives in support of his opinion that the bapitsm of the Holy Spirit is a separate work than regeneration. Still, I appreciate his exegesis as a whole, and thought he made strong points, especially in his many mentions Christians throughout history that have experienced an extraordinary relationship with God. This book inspired me to seek God and to seek being filled with the Holy Spirit, even though I might not call such a falling the baptism of the Spirit like Lloyd-Jones would.