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eBook Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality (New Studies in Biblical Theology) download

by peter-adam

eBook Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality (New Studies in Biblical Theology) download ISBN: 1844740021
Author: peter-adam
Publisher: Inter-Varsity Press (2004)
Language: English
ePub: 1890 kb
Fb2: 1805 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Christian Living

In response, Peter Adam urges us to renew our confidence in a biblical model of spirituality and to test our spirituality by the .

In response, Peter Adam urges us to renew our confidence in a biblical model of spirituality and to test our spirituality by the Bible. Drawing on a selection of Old and New Testament texts, along with significant insights from the Christian tradition (including John Calvin and the Puritans), this New Studies in Biblical Theology volume expounds the shape and structure of a gospel-centered "spirituality of the Word" through which we know God himself and receive the life he gives.

NSBT: Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality (NSBT Vol. 16) (Adam) is included with the following packages: category.

Biblical studies is the academic application of a set of diverse disciplines to the study of the Bible (the Tanakh and the New Testament). For its theory and methods, the field draws on disciplines ranging from archaeology, ancient history, cultural. For its theory and methods, the field draws on disciplines ranging from archaeology, ancient history, cultural backgrounds, textual criticism, literary criticism, historical backgrounds, philology, and social science.

Hearing God's Words book. Start by marking Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality as Want to Read

Hearing God's Words book. Start by marking Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A Biblical Theology of Preaching. Carson, offers a wealth of serious theological engagement and biblical faithfulness, and displays some of the best biblical theology in this generation

A Biblical Theology of Preaching. The New Studies in Biblical Theology will help you think critically about each of the covered topics, and provide content for sermons and lessons. Carson, offers a wealth of serious theological engagement and biblical faithfulness, and displays some of the best biblical theology in this generation. I secure and seek quickly to read every volume that comes out in this series.

Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology Categories: Special Studies in Biblical Theology. In response, Peter Adam urges us to renew our confidence in a biblical model of spirituality and to test our spirituality by the Bible

Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology Categories: Special Studies in Biblical Theology. Many discussions of Christian spirituality draw on a range of traditions and "disciplines. In response, Peter Adam urges us to renew our confidence in a biblical model of spirituality and to test our spirituality by the Bible. Drawing on a selection of Old and New Testament texts, along with significant insights from the Christian tradition (including John Calvin and the Puritans), he expounds the shape and structure of a gospel-centered "spirituality of the Word" through which we know God himself and receive the life he gives.

Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality (New Studies in Biblical Theology).

Peter Bolt's book on the big themes of Mark and their connection to greater issues in biblical theology is quite helpful. I was a little disappointed in the way Bolt set "religion" apart as something problematic that will get in the way of being a true disciple. His reason for doing so was to point out the problems of the religion of Pharisaical Judaism set in juxtaposition to Jesus' teaching in the New Testament. Hearing God's Words: Exploring Biblical Spirituality (New Studies in Biblical Theology).

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprising New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. New Studies in Biblical Theology. InterVarsity Press, IVP Academic.

Carson, offers a wealth of serious theological engagement and biblical faithfulness, and displays some of the best biblical theology in this generation

Carson, offers a wealth of serious theological engagement and biblical faithfulness, and displays some of the best biblical theology in this generation.

New Studies in Biblical Theology - Hearing God's Words – Exploring biblical spirituality (NSBT). The New Testament book of Galatians deals with this question-a question that stands at the heart of the gospel. Little attention, however, appears to have been given to the Bible itself for its teaching on this theme or as a source of spirituality. In Christ Has Set Us Free, nine seasoned Bible teachers walk through the entirety of Galatians, offering insights on how to interpret and apply its important message about justification by faith.

Rare book
Comments: (2)
Lemana
As I began to read Hearing God's Words, I had high expectations. I got this book because I felt it is always important for me as a reminder not to approach the Holy Word of God academically as I do find myself doing sometimes. There is a need to read it devotionally. As much as what D.A. Carson said during his conference in Kuala Lumpur a couple of months ago that we can and should combine both the devotional reading and studying of Scriptures - do devotion in Greek for example and in my case, do devotion through my assignments - it is still a good reminder.

Halfway through the book however, I felt a bit lost: either I lost him or he lost me. I understand that the word "spirituality" is notoriously difficult to define. Peter Adam did not define or explain it and as such, when I was midway through, I did not know what he was getting at.

He started by stressing the importance of biblical spirituality without quite explaining what it is exactly. That was followed by what I refer to as short introductions of various books in the Old and New Testament. I kept saying, I know but so what? When I reached the chapter where he summarises Calvin's theology of revelation, I had to start again from the beginning, because he totally lost me. It was not until the third quarter of the book, when he discussed the issues in spirituality that I began to have an idea where he is going. With that, I had to again restarted right from the beginning!

Adam segregated the Christian belief into 3 schools of thought (p.40-41):

(1) The Reformed and Evangelical View
- all God's saving words and works are found within the Bible
- spirituality of the Word will focus entirely on the Bible for the content of the knowledge of God
- the witness of the Spirit within the believer and the Church will correspond with his external witness in Scripture (I don't quite understand this statement, by the way)

(2) The Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and some charismatics view
- in addition to the Bible, God has continued to do his saving works and words over the last 2000 years
- he has revealed new truths and supported them with new miracles
- spirituality of the Word will not only include the words of the Bible but also words given to the Church since Bible times, whether recognised by the Pope, Patriach, or Council of the Church, or given by a prophet in a local church

(3) The Quaker and Liberal View
- revelation comes direct from God today by observation, reason, experience or emotion
- it may include some ideas from the Bible, tradition of the Church but will find other parts obsolete and irrelevant
- a spirituality of discerning what God is saying at the present time, in the world around or within our own conscience
- a spirituality of the contemporary words of God

Holding the first view, Adam writes to show how the Bible is a rich and fruitful resource for spirituality. He writes to show the fundamental shape and structure of the "spirituality of the Word" and the spirituality that the Bible teaches and encourages and what it results from using the Bible. He does it through highlighting the importance of the imparting of the Word through the Old and New Testament, what John Calvin said about revelation, through some issues and examples in spirituality.

Holding the first view myself, I kept having this feeling that he is merely stating the obvious. As such, I am not sure how it would follow through with those holding the second or third view.
Innadril
What could I share with my church? God has spoken; he speaks now, and has a great deal to say to us continually. The limitations of Pentecostalism reduce the means by which God speaks. For instance, a church service where the preacher and believer are vessels through which God speaks, the first by sermon preparation and delivery and the second by the gifts of the Holy Spirit in whoever `feels' they should speak for God. If this is true, then God cannot possibly be speaking to the world. This is a huge contradiction of the Gospel. (John 3:16-17) "For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him." How can the world know what God has said, is saying, and wants to say if a church service is the only context through which God speaks?

Spirituality is the context through which God speaks and includes creation, community and Holy Communion (and even a dumb ass to Balaam). But spirituality has to find its moorings in the Bible or it can be subjective to the miniature narrative of our own existence instead of Creator Father God. Therefore, the Bible tells us to marvel at his handiwork and consider it. Surely God is speaking to us as we do this? Surely God speaks to us through our responsibilities and duties? For me, it would be as a husband, father, pastor, neighbor and fellow human being both privately and publically. But this eclectic variety has to be anchored in the Bible so it becomes a definitive biblical spirituality where God is Father who speaks to the world and to me. We must not spoil this by substituting the bible, adding to it or exaggerating it. We must approach it in its fullness without attempting to get away with the bare minimum. Neither must we take the fullness of the Bible and use it as an argument against error or false teaching.

Throughout the Bible God `speaks.' In Genesis it was words of power and promise. In Deuteronomy it was words of proclamation. In Psalms it was living hope. In Proverbs true wisdom. In Job it was words characterized in revelation and finally, in Jeremiah God's words are put in the mouth. Therefore, in the Old Testament the Bible shows the variety of ways in which God singularly `speaks.' The same can be said throughout the New Testament. God was not silent but spoke through his Son Jesus in the Gospel accounts. In Romans God speaks like the book of Deuteronomy in proclamation. Colossians shows that God's words dwell in us (mainly through community participation in God's words); Hebrews becomes a reminder of what God has already said, while Peter and John write about God speaking living and enduring words. Finally, the Holy Spirit is speaking what he hears around the throne of God directly to his church. This is not just heard on a Sunday, but again, through creation, community and Holy Communion. I would also add that certain times, seasons, objects, actions and places can be the sacred means by which God speaks. A birthday celebration can be a sacred moment parallel to an individual baby dedication or adult baptism. God is still speaking. Again, this has to be moored in the Bible. If this does not happen then we become subject to many voices that compete for our time and attention - namely Satan and his words to Eve.

I would summarize this to a friend by taking the `weird' and `crazy' out of God speaking to us. We do not need to stand in a cemetery in the early hours of the morning waiting for `something' to speak to us! The Bible does not take us out of the world we live in and into artificial seminary to learn about God. The Bible encourages the journey through life on earth. (Matthew 6:10) "...your will be done on earth as it is in heaven." I would tell my friend that he can know God personally in the context of the world that He loves. He will not know God directly, as not even the heavens and earth He created can contain him so how much less will our minds comprehend him. But this paradox is not a contradiction of the Bible. It reveals that the incomprehensible God and Father can be known through His Son Jesus.

I would also tell my friend that God does not speak to him in the tone of Charlton Hesston, also taking the weird and crazy out of it. I would add that God speaks to him through others, through him in his day-to-day living, in him within his conscience - but also like him. So, God speaks to be like a forty-one year old English man living in the United States. Why would he speak like my father, mother, wife, children, friends or enemies? He can speak through all of these but not like them. I would not be listening. The fact remains that my friend listens to himself more than anything or anyone else. This has biblical moorings and is therefore biblical spirituality.

The fact that God has spoken, speaks now, and wants to say a lot more builds a rich God-human relationship and transforms human relationships. Through any means (creation, community or Holy Communion) the words of God shape our experience. He commands that we `love our enemies' which is utterly transforming. He also commands that we `forgive' even as we have been forgiven. We did not actually do anything to be forgiven. Grace was not given to us because we repented. Grace was extended that we may repent. God's words to us are that we forgive `others' before they say or do anything. Because this is powerfully transforming in human relationships it must proceed from a God-human relationship.

It also means that God can be speaking to me through community that is entirely `human.' Of that community, some are family, friends and colleagues. Others are enemies or not known to me. In either case, God can speak through them to me. Again, this can transform human relationships but must be balanced within the Bible, otherwise, those who God speaks through can become `special people' which God never intended. Thank God Balaam did not turn his ass into an icon to worship - ass worshipping people?