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eBook Escape download

by Laura Palmer,Carolyn Jessop

eBook Escape download ISBN: 0767927575
Author: Laura Palmer,Carolyn Jessop
Publisher: Broadway Books; Reprint edition (December 30, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 426
ePub: 1112 kb
Fb2: 1224 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit rtf mbr mobi
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Christian Denominations and Sects

Escape is a book by Carolyn Jessop and Laura Palmer. It discusses Jessop's upbringing in the FLDS polygamous community.

Escape is a book by Carolyn Jessop and Laura Palmer. Her childhood was affected by the sect's suspicion of outsiders, the division that took place in that FLDS in the 1970s and '80s and by the increasing strictness of the sect her family belonged to. She experienced life with a mother who suffered from depression and was violent with her children

CAROLYN JESSOP was born into the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, a group splintered .

CAROLYN JESSOP was born into the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, a group splintered from and renounced by the Mormon Church, and spent most of her life in Colorado City, Arizona, the main base of the FLDS. Since leaving the group in 2003, she has lived in West Jordon, Utah, with her eight children. LAURA PALMER is the author of Shrapnel in the Heart and collaborated on five other books, the most recent being To Catch a Predator with NBC's Chris Hansen. She lives in New York City.

This is the summary of Escape by Carolyn Jessop, Laura Palmer. Ellen Hopkins Author Interview - Продолжительность: 2:56 Simon & Schuster Books Recommended for you. 2:56. ABBA - The Winner Takes It All (1980) HD 0815007 - Продолжительность: 4:49 ForbiddenInGermany2 Recommended for you.

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Laura Palmer first met me as a reporter, then became my collaborator and, ultimately, a friend. Audrey, Merril Jessop’s daughter, and her husband, Merlin Johnson, were the only relatives from my ex-husband’s family who reached out to me in kindness after my escape.

Laura Palmer first met me as a reporter, then became my collaborator and, ultimately, a friend. She helped me find my voice and translate it to the page. Her compassion was invaluable as I revisited the most traumatic moments of my life. Thank you. I found inspiration and hope from mentors like Jon Krakauer, Crystal Maggelet, and Dorothy and Bruce Solomon.

Carolyn Jessop was born into the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, a group . Laura Palmer is the author of Shrapnel in the Heart and collaborated on five other books, including To Catch a Predator with NBC's Chris Hansen.

Discover ideas about Laura Palmer. Warren Jeffs and his favourite "wife", Naomie Jessop Jeffs. Naomie's hair is dyed and in cornrows because she is attempting to "disguise" herself as a "Gentile" in preparation for going on the run with Warren

Discover ideas about Laura Palmer. Laura Palmer Second Wife Anderson Cooper Latter Day Saints Cousins Diabetes Diabetic Living. Naomie's hair is dyed and in cornrows because she is attempting to "disguise" herself as a "Gentile" in preparation for going on the run with Warren. As for the flat-cap, God only knows what she was thinking.

When she was eighteen years old, Carolyn Jessop was coerced into an arranged marriage with a total stranger: a man thirty-two years her senior. Merril Jessop already had three wives. When she was eighteen years old, Carolyn Jessop was coerced into an arranged marriage with a total stranger: a man thirty-two years her senior.

The dramatic first-person account of life inside an ultra-fundamentalist American religious sect, and one woman’s courageous flight to freedom with her eight children.When she was eighteen years old, Carolyn Jessop was coerced into an arranged marriage with a total stranger: a man thirty-two years her senior. Merril Jessop already had three wives. But arranged plural marriages were an integral part of Carolyn’s heritage: She was born into and raised in the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (FLDS), the radical offshoot of the Mormon Church that had settled in small communities along the Arizona-Utah border. Over the next fifteen years, Carolyn had eight children and withstood her husband’s psychological abuse and the watchful eyes of his other wives who were locked in a constant battle for supremacy.Carolyn’s every move was dictated by her husband’s whims. He decided where she lived and how her children would be treated. He controlled the money she earned as a school teacher. He chose when they had sex; Carolyn could only refuse at her own peril. For in the FLDS, a wife’s compliance with her husband determined how much status both she and her children held in the family. Carolyn was miserable for years and wanted out, but she knew that if she tried to leave and got caught, her children would be taken away from her. No woman in the country had ever escaped from the FLDS and managed to get her children out, too. But in 2003, Carolyn chose freedom over fear and fled her home with her eight children. She had $20 to her name.Escape exposes a world tantamount to a prison camp, created by religious fanatics who, in the name of God, deprive their followers the right to make choices, force women to be totally subservient to men, and brainwash children in church-run schools. Against this background, Carolyn Jessop’s flight takes on an extraordinary, inspiring power. Not only did she manage a daring escape from a brutal environment, she became the first woman ever granted full custody of her children in a contested suit involving the FLDS. And in 2006, her reports to the Utah attorney general on church abuses formed a crucial part of the case that led to the arrest of their notorious leader, Warren Jeffs.
Comments: (7)
Jozrone
It's easy to understand why the FLDS has been referred to as the American Taliban. Carolyn's book was excellent, although really painful to read, as she details of the extreme abuse and misery that women, children (& animals) suffer in this cult. It is very difficult to wrap your mind around the fact that this group continues to exist TODAY in the US. Unfortunate people born into the life are totally brain washed and cut off from reality. Otherwise, they would never accept their miserable lives! The FLDS went from bad to worse, when Jeffs became their "profit." He has to be one of the most evil people to ever walk the earth! Through his carefully chosen leadership, he continues to control every aspect of the member's lives (even from prison.) The male leadership of this cult are egomaniacal and devoid of decency. They seem only focused on gaining/keeping their power and impregnating as many women as possible (supported by the US tax payer) in an quest to become Gods in the afterlife. Until death, they rein like kings, having their pick of women and underage girls, well into their old age. Marriages are arranged and unless one is powerful enough, couples have no say in who they marry. What a sad world for the majority. No rights, no love, no grace and no hope! God bless Carolyn for having the guts to escape with her children. I wish her many years of happiness in life.
anneli
Excellent book - read through it quickly and could not put it down. Towards the very end it was a bit confusing and jumbled (my edition had a writer's "update" attached to it). Since then, I have read "Stolen Innocence" and started on "The Witness Wore Red" but still prefer "Escape" (I do have the sequel "Triumph" on order). Carolyn Jessop was able to flee the FDLS and successfully fight for custody of her 8 children - including 1 profoundly disabled one while navigating life outside the cult. Unlike the majority of FDLS women, she was able to go to college (which she had to fight for) while being in an arranged marriage with a man 32 years older than her in a place where women are expected to be subordinate to the men's desires and wishes and that of the FDLS church. These women are systematically denied medical treatment for pregnancy, labor, mental illness, genetic conditions, and basically anything else - but Jessop she was able to fight in her own way by defying and outsmarting the priesthood in order to get her disabled son the help he needed while she was in the FDLS. The girls and women are never taught that there is anything besides the FDLS that would give them rights, privileges or a voice, or that any abuse (physically or emotional) against them is wrong. Jessop took a risk when she escaped with 8 children in tow that there was a better life - with only $20 in her pocket, she didn't when or how she was going to get help, but she made it and it's a great story.
Leyl
Riveting and infuriating at the same time. I couldn't put the book down, as it was well written in a logical sequence with attention-grabbing scenes throughout. At the same time, I was angry and sad during much of the read due to the descriptions of horrendous abuse that is inflicted upon the FLDS members, especially the least powerful ones. Not only is the abuse of the children enough to make me want to cry, but the psychological pain and humiliation inflicted on the less favored women is infuriating. It seems like the whole system is set up to demoralize them as much as possible, causing them to mistreat one another as they jockey for favored positions. This inhumane treatment of children and women, as well as some of the adolescent "lost" boys is highly encouraged by leadership. It is obvious from the title that the co-author gets out, eventually, so no spoiler alerts here. I am glad that she was able to escape from that hellish environment and get her kids out as well. When you read the book, you will find out how truly brave she was for even attempting to get them all out. My emotional roller coaster while reading the book is proof enough of excellent writing.
FireWater
Unbelievable read. Jessop was able to place readers directly into her former life within the FLDS and allow us to feel every bit of abuse perpetrated upon her, her children, her stepchildren, and her sister wives. The level of misogyny within the cult was staggering and only became worse as Warren Jeffs took hold, and Jessop describes it in great detail. She stands apart from what we see as the typical FDLS wife in that she was allowed to get a college education and was able to hold down multiple jobs during her tenure with the cult. The fact that she had some contact with the outside world probably led to her eventual escape.

I feel deeply for all of the women and children who did not manage to get out and realize that they actually had rights and didn't have to follow the prophet blindly. Jeffs and his minions invoke God to explain away rampant physical and sexual abuse, denial of education, denial of medical intervention, exile of young boys, and marital reassignments.
Flower
I already knew some things about the FLDS cult and Warren Jeff's actions, but I learned so much more from this book . I had trouble putting it down to get something else done. Carolyn writing style keeps you involved, entertained, and amazed at how she kept going in such a vile culture. I see why it is next to impossible for most women to escape alone, let alone with their children. And since she grew up in this culture she (like the other women and children) knew no other way existed and accepted her lot in life, only gradually realizing the outside world was not all poised to destroy her and her children as they are taught. I don't think I would have been so strong. And I am very sad that Warren Jeffs still seems to have so much control over his "people" even from prison and that many children were eventually forced to return to their "parents" after the compound was raided.