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eBook The Lapsed / The Unity of the Catholic Church (Ancient Christian Writers, No. 25) download

by St. Cyprian,Maurice Bevenot

eBook The Lapsed / The Unity of the Catholic Church (Ancient Christian Writers, No. 25) download ISBN: 0809102609
Author: St. Cyprian,Maurice Bevenot
Publisher: Paulist Press (December 1, 1957)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1529 kb
Fb2: 1228 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Christian Denominations and Sects

Book 25 of 61 in the Ancient Christian Writers Series. St. Cyprian of Carthage was one of the giants of the 3rd century North African church. He also deals with the Unity of the Church under the authority of the See of Rome and the Successor of the Apostles

Book 25 of 61 in the Ancient Christian Writers Series. Although his period of ministry was relatively short, ending with martyrdom, the influence he had on the Church, not only in Carthage, but throughout the Christian world was profound. He also deals with the Unity of the Church under the authority of the See of Rome and the Successor of the Apostles.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 25 March 2011. Export citation Request permission. Recommend this journal. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History.

Cyprian (Latin: Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus) was bishop of Carthage and an important Early Christian writer, many of whose Latin works are extant. He was born around the beginning of the 3rd century in North Africa, perhaps at Carthage, where he received a classical education. After converting to Christianity, he became a bishop in 249 and eventually died a martyr at Carthage. Other books in the series. Ancient Christian Writers (1 - 10 of 65 books).

Recommend this journal.

Published June 1957 by Paulist Press. 1. At last, dear brethren, peace has been restored to the Church and, though the pessimists thought it improbable and the pagans impossible, we have recovered our liberty through the avenging intervention of God. The Physical Object.

Cyprian: The Lapsed, The Unity of the Catholic Church translated by Maurice Bévenot. Methodius: The Symposium: A Treatise on Chastity translated by Herbert Musurillo. Arnobius of Sicca, vol. 1 translated by G. E. McCracken

Cyprian: The Lapsed, The Unity of the Catholic Church translated by Maurice Bévenot. McCracken. 2 translated by G. Athanasius: The Life of St. Antony translated by Robert T. Meyer. Evagrius Ponticus: Ad Monachos translated by Jeremy Driscoll. Gregory of Nyssa: The Lord’s Prayer, the Beatitudes translated by Hilda C. Graef.

Cyprian's writings portray vividly the life of the Christian Church in the middle of the third century. The two pastoral addresses of this intensely devout bishop reveal the aftermath of the persecution by the Emperor Decius.

St. Cyprian's writings portray vividly the life of the Christian Church in the middle of the third century. The two pastoral addresses of this intensely devout bishop reveal the aftermath of the persecution by the Emperor Decius.
Comments: (5)
Gigafish
Excellent!
Bluddefender
St. Cyprian of Carthage was one of the giants of the 3rd century North African church. Although his period of ministry was relatively short, ending with martyrdom, the influence he had on the Church, not only in Carthage, but throughout the Christian world was profound.
In these two essays, Cyprian deals with the problems presented by the "lapsed" -- those Christians who, under threat of persecution, renounced their faith in some manner. He also deals with the Unity of the Church under the authority of the See of Rome and the Successor of the Apostles. Sometimes, Cyprian is eisegeted in such as fashion as to suggest that the North African church was independant of Rome. Those who make such suggestions have simply not read nor understood Cyprian in his entirety. While it is true that he was a man of strong passion and conviction -- and was not hesitant to criticize the Bishop of Rome -- Rome held his submission and his obedience -- even when he felt Rome was in error.
A lesson, perhaps, that modern-day Catholics might do well to emulate.
A wonderful, necessary addition to any serious student of Church History.
Anayalore
Many Christians, both Protestant and Catholic, like to refer to St. Cyprian of Carthage to prover their points either for or the authority of the Papacy. It occurs to me that many of these apologists have not actually READ Cyprian! For those persons, and for all others interested in what he REALLY said and thought, read this scholarly translation of two of his more readily accessible works "The Lapsed" dealing with Christians who had broken under persecution, and "The Unity of the Catholic Church" dealing with his relationship as the bishop of a major city, with the Bishop of Rome.
Malalrajas
Perfectly described! Exactly what I expected. A good theological reference book.
Lightbinder
The last reviewer confuses Cyprian's meaning and intent. Peter's primatus for Cyprian is one of chronology not Papal primatus. In fact Cyprian edited out his use of "primatus" from his later editions. Cyprian's letters are clear about his meaning. In a letter related to his disagreement with Pope Stpehen written to Bishop Pompeius he is quite disparaging of the Pope and his knowledge. Hardly the writings of a Bishop "submissive to Rome. I urge anyone reading this book to also read his letters which are quite clear on his view of the role of the Roman see.