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eBook Doctors of the Church download

by Pope Benedict XVI

eBook Doctors of the Church download ISBN: 161278576X
Author: Pope Benedict XVI
Publisher: Our Sunday Visitor (September 27, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1133 kb
Fb2: 1145 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: docx azw doc rtf
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Catholicism

Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: Benedictus XVI; Italian: Benedetto XVI; German: Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger; German pronunciation: ; 16 April 1927) is a retired prelate of the Catholic Church who served as head.

Pope Benedict XVI (Latin: Benedictus XVI; Italian: Benedetto XVI; German: Benedikt XVI; born Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger; German pronunciation: ; 16 April 1927) is a retired prelate of the Catholic Church who served as head of the Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013.

On 20 August 2011, Pope Benedict XVI announced that he would soon declare St. John of Ávila a Doctor of the Church. Although no official announcement was given, it was reported in December 2011 that Pope Benedict intended to declare Hildegard of Bingen as a Doctor of the Church despite her not yet having been officially canonized. St. Hildegard of Bingen. was officially declared to be a Saint of the universal Church by Pope Benedict XVI on 10 May 2012, clearing the way for her to be named a Doctor of the Church.

Doctors of the Church" is the latest in the continuing series from Our Sunday Visitor's book publishing division containing the general addresses of Benedict XVI as he looks at the leaders and shapers of the Church. Previous volumes focused on the Apostles, leaders of the early Church, holy women and medieval theologians. As he started the series, the Holy Father used the charming phrase "portrait gallery" to sum up his efforts and he continues the tour of it in "Doctors of the Church.

Now Pope Benedict XVI explores the lives and significance of thirty-two of the Doctors of the Church like no one else can. Taken directly from the pope's addresses in his weekly audiences. Taken directly from the pope's addresses in his weekly audiences, Doctors of the Church is an incredible journey through time to better understand these individuals who explored and explained the critical questions of the Church:Who is Christ?How do we know Christ?How do we act as Christ's disciples?How are we in Christ? The mission of the Church in every age is to introduce the world to Christ, its savior.

Benedict XVI would be No. 34 (assuming no others are named beforehand). A doctor of the Church must be holy. Joseph Ratzinger was, in heart and mind, an academic, a man deeply in love with the truth, a man made to teach. But then he was named an archbishop in 1977 and, in 1981, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, overseeing the faith, morals and doctrine of the Church. I have not had the time to read nearly as much of Benedict’s writings as I would like.

Now Pope Benedict XVI explores the lives and significance of thirty-two of the Doctors of the Church like no one else . The book is a valuable resource, providing brief biographies and overviews of the major works and theological contributions of these holy men and women

Now Pope Benedict XVI explores the lives and significance of thirty-two of the Doctors of the Church like no one else can. Taken directly from the pope's addresses in his weekly audiences, Doctors of the Church is an incredible journey through time to better understand these individuals who explored and explained the critical questions of the Church. The book is a valuable resource, providing brief biographies and overviews of the major works and theological contributions of these holy men and women. Reading it is inspirational without being difficult, and has pointed me to further reading, . what the doctors themselves wrote.

Pope Benedict's official resignation statement offered his waning physical and mental powers as the explanation, but it's long been suspected there was more to it. And my inquiries have confirmed that. I went to visit the Nigerian Cardinal, Francis Arinze at his apartment overlooking St Peter's. He's one of the most senior figures in the church and knows the Vatican like the back of his hand. He was even, for a short time in March of this year, mooted as a possible successor to Pope Benedict.

Benedict XVI & The Benedict Option

Benedict XVI & The Benedict Option. Here is a man at the pinnacle of the Catholic Church, a man who loyally served Pope Benedict XVI (and who now serves Pope Francis as head of his household), speaking in apocalyptic terms about the sex abuse scandal and the general loss of faith across the West. He praised my work on the Catholic scandal, and the work of independent Catholic journalists.

They are saints and teachers, monks, priests, bishops, and nuns. They faced opposition and exile. They lived in periods of confusion and conflict.Their teachings and insights not only brought peace and understanding to the Church of their time, but continue to anchor the Church of today. They brought clarity to the fragments and simplicity to the complex. They used speeches, documents, poems, and songs to reach the people of their time. Now Pope Benedict XVI explores the lives and significance of thirty-two of the Doctors of the Church like no one else can. Taken directly from the pope's addresses in his weekly audiences, Doctors of the Church is an incredible journey through time to better understand these individuals who explored and explained the critical questions of the Church. ---Who is Christ?---How do we know Christ?---How do we act as Christ's disciples?---How are we in Christ?"The mission of the Church in every age is to introduce the world to Christ, its savior. The Church cannot accomplish her mission without learned men and women who are saints of God."--- Francis Cardinal George, O.M.I., Archbishop of Chicago
Comments: (7)
Still In Mind
"Doctors of the Church" is the latest in the continuing series from Our Sunday Visitor's book publishing division containing the general addresses of Benedict XVI as he looks at the leaders and shapers of the Church. Previous volumes focused on the Apostles, leaders of the early Church, holy women and medieval theologians. As he started the series, the Holy Father used the charming phrase "portrait gallery" to sum up his efforts and he continues the tour of it in "Doctors of the Church."

In this book, taken from addresses ranging from 2007 until 2011, Benedict offers memorable portraits of 32 of the 33 recognized Doctors of the Church (St. Peter Chrysologus is missing). Even his sharpest critics have conceded that Benedict is one of the leading theologians of his time. In these addresses, readers can catch a glimpse of the type of professor Joseph Ratzinger must have been in his decades long academic career. He offers concise and memorable portraits of the various Doctors, offering readers biographical facts and quick takes on theology, thought and how these various religious leaders and thinkers shaped the Church.

In these portraits, Benedict offers a whirlwind but surprisingly effective tour in the development of Christian thought over two millenia by looking at these key thinkers. Not surprisingly--Benedict did his dissertation on him--the longest chapter is on St. Augustine. The Holy Father offers extended takes on St. Bonaventure--the subject of his habilitation--and St. Thomas Aquinas as well. While these are useful and enjoyable, Benedict offers some real introductory gems to lesser known figures--St. Hilary of Poitiers and St. Peter Damien for example. The Holy Father is also able to offer refreshingly appreciation for better known figures such as St. Teresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross and St. Therese of Lisieux.

Drawing from lecturers given over four years and touching on two thousand years of Christian thought in less than 275 pages, this book should have been a disaster. Instead, with Benedict's clear and concise addresses, readers are left with a deeper understanding of the Church and how it was shaped over centuries by many hands.

The publisher did a remarkable job with the translation and there is a fine introduction by Francis Cardinal George.

Benedict is one of the rarest of writers--and I suspect this will be one of the reasons his books will remain in publication for decades and perhaps centuries down the road. His writings can appeal to readers at every level--those looking for an introduction to a particular subject or thinker as well as to those who have been studying it for years. This rare gift is on display in "Doctors of the Church" which means this work should appeal to almost all readers no matter their familiarity with the topic. Highest recommendation.
Kanek
A helpful book of Pope Benedict XVI's reflections on the Doctors of the Church at the time of his abdication with the exception of St. Peter Chrysologus. Also absent are the Doctors named by Pope Francis: St. John of Avila, St. Hildegard of Bingen and St. Gregory of Narek. The collection from Pope Benedict's catechesis in his weekly audiences as Pope is more of a spiritual, than historical reflection. Though his comments clearly tie the teachings of the acknowledged Doctors as a continuous thread going back to the early Church and on though strife and social change up to the modern age.
GawelleN
This is a wonderful book. In it Pope Benedict XVI discusses 32 of the 33 Doctors of the Church (for some reason he never got around to writing one for St. Peter Chrysologus). Each chapter contains a brief biography of the Doctor along with a discussion of his or her (yes, there are currently 3 female Doctors) teachings and contributions to the Church and often the world.

Interestingly each chapter began as one of the Pope's addresses at his general audiences. This may account for why the book is an easy read compared to many of his other works. Personally I enjoy history and theology and I am a big fan of Pope Benedict, so naturally it is to be expected that this book would make to the top of my list of favorites. What clinched its success with me is that every so often, just now and again, Pope Benedict stops and turns to the reader and says something to the effect of "this is why this Doctor is still relevant to you and me today, because we are facing the same issues, we have the same problems." Although rare, those few personal moments in the book sent chills through me and yet made me feel warm and tingly at the same time.

A truly great read.
Undeyn
This is Benedict XVI at his best. The essays in this book are the result of a life dedicated to research and teaching. Good insights for today are included. Worth the read if you are interested in Church History and some giants of the Christian faith.
Mayno
great
Orll
I learned a great deal from this book which gave me a far better perspective of the Church. It was interesting to see the development of the Church.
Lamranilv
Drawn from catecheses given by the pope during various general audiences from 2007 – 2011, these brief essays give a brief background on the various Doctors and prayerful reflection on their various accomplishments. Taken as such, it is a useful volume to guide prayer and perhaps point the reader to further research. Someone looking for detailed history and interpretation will have to look elsewhere, however.

Except for some of the “big names” who get multiple talks (St. Augustine, 5; St. Bonaventure and St. Thomas Aquinas, 3; St. Basil, St. Gregory Nazianzus, St. John Chrysostom, St. Jerome, and St. Gregory the Great, 2), most of these saints are covered in a half-dozen pages or so. (And then there is the notable absence of a talk on St. Peter Chrysologus. Why was he left out?) That’s only enough to give us a taste of their importance and accomplishments. Still, Pope Benedict does manage to give us some thoughtful commentary and make connections as to why these people remain important to us today.

Still, it’s hard not to feel left wanting more.
Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI is so accessible! Reading his works is like he's sitting at your table having an easy discussion about deep topics. Love it!