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eBook Song of Songs (Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms) download

by Tremper Longman III,Richard S. Hess

eBook Song of Songs (Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms) download ISBN: 0801027128
Author: Tremper Longman III,Richard S. Hess
Publisher: Baker Academic; Edition Unstated edition (April 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1142 kb
Fb2: 1637 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: rtf lrf lit mbr
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

Find your next great read with Kindle Unlimited. An accomplished, celebrative volume. He provides excellent footnotes supporting his interpretive strategies as well as the most balanced summary of the interpretation and dating questions of this book of the Bible.

The Book of Jeremiah. Index of Scripture and Other Ancient Writings. The book of Proverbs describes wisdom, which on one level is skill for living, the ability to navigate life’s actual and potential pitfalls; but on another level, this wisdom presents a pervasive and deeply theological message: The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge (Prov.

Following an introduction to the biblical book and a history of its interpretation, Hess divides his discussion into seven major sections. Technical questions related to the Hebrew text or scholarly debate are addressed in the footnotes.

With his deft exegetical and expositional skill, the resulting work is full of fresh insight into the meaning of the text.

Tremper Longman III (born 8 September 1952) is an Old Testament scholar, theologian, professor and author of several books, including 2009 ECPA Christian Book Award winner Dictionary of the Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry & Writings

Tremper Longman III (born 8 September 1952) is an Old Testament scholar, theologian, professor and author of several books, including 2009 ECPA Christian Book Award winner Dictionary of the Old Testament: Wisdom, Poetry & Writings. Longman is Distinguished Scholar of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California, where he was the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies for nineteen years before his retirement in 2017.

This series is tailored to the distinctives of poetry and wisdom literature. Features include: Emphasis on the message of the biblical book. Special attention to poetic structure and literary devices.

Veteran Old Testament scholar Tremper Longman of. ore.

Tremper Longman III, John Goldingay, Craig G. Bartholomew, and Richard S. Hess are experts who give special attention to the poetic structure and literary devices of Old Testament Scripture.

Richard Hess has written an insightful commentary on one of the most intriguing books of the Bible, which celebrates God's gift of love.Following an introduction to the biblical book and a history of its interpretation, Hess divides his discussion into seven major sections. Each section begins with a fresh translation, followed by paragraph-by-paragraph commentary, and concluding with a summary of the passage's theological implications.Technical questions related to the Hebrew text or scholarly debate are addressed in the footnotes. Pastors and teachers will find here an accessible commentary that will serve as an excellent resource for their study.This is the first volume in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms series.
Comments: (7)
Arcanefire
I'm a pastor who is planning a sermon series through Song of Songs. In my research on the book I decided to purchase this commentary and have become fond of it. It's worth noting that the editor of this Baker Commentary series (Longman III) wrote his own commentary on the Song of Songs in the NICOT series. Because of this, I believe Hess had an unspoken (or maybe even spoken) understanding that he had better do a first rate job on this commentary. I believe he has done just that.

When the author of the Word Commentary on Genesis (Wenham) writes a rave review on an Old Testament Commentary of any book, it is worth noting, because of his extensive knowledge of ancient near eastern culture.

First we have about 285 pages on this 8 chapter book. He lays the material out in a very readable form. Hess reviews the options and declares his position without being shy about it. Sometimes he does not explain his reasons in depth, but you do find out where he stands. For example in his introduction he simply says that the Song of Songs should not be read as a drama (one major view), but that it closely resembles ancient neareast poetry, especially Egyptian love poetry. He gives an extensive 17 page bibliography on Song of Songs associated material at the end of the book. For students doing research, here you go!

Hess also gives you good nuggets for further study on a variety of issues, like dating, authorship, the history of interpretation of this book, etc... On the history of interpretation he cites Pope as the most extensive known history of interpretation on Song of Songs. Things like this reveal a breadth of knowledge on the subject and also assist new students in sorting through the myriad of potential sources. He's excellent in this way throughout the book.

One criticism: he often refers to a wasf in his outline and in the book. Unfortunately the definition of this term is hard to find. I stumbled across it in the middle of some text on page 31. I would prefer that they asterisk that term and send you to the definition page whenever they use it or at least in the first chunk of the book. Since many people do not read commentaries from cover to cover, that's frustrating. (By the way it is an arabic term for love poetry).

After what I would consider a short introduction, he gives an outline for the book and then begins his commentary. His outline is as follows:
I. Title
II. Prologue: first coming together and intimacy 1:2-2:7
III. Lovers joined and separated 2:8 to 3:5
IV. Love and marriage at the heart of the song 3:6 to 5:1
V. Search and reunion 5:2 to 6:3
VI. Desire for the female and love in he country 6:4 to 8:4
VII. Epilogue: The power of love 8:5 to end

Hess comments with references that are easy to read, but on the technical side as far as Song of Songs commentaries go. This is no devotional commentary. It has transliterations of ancient language terminology throughout. He often cites how many times a term appears, where it first appears and how that is all relevant to the text at hand.

This commentary has no excursions. There are no articles on theological implications that draw out Christological allusions or parallels. It is entirely focused on a literal rendering of the book.

On the actual text Hess provides his own translation. If you are working on a specific verse in Song of Songs, it is easy to navigate Hess. The commentary relationship to the text is clearly marked. Overall this commentary is very valuable and one that I have been referring to regularly since I received it. Get a copy today.
Buge
Hess' work will revolutionize one's understanding of this seemingly nebulous book of Hebrew poetry. It makes an excellent undergraduate textbook and can be read from cover to cover like an ordinary book. All of the Hebrew vocabulary is transliterated, making it accessible for those unfamiliar with the language. After a brief, but informative discussion of the history of Song of Songs interpretation, Hess begins a verse-by-verse discussion of the entire poem. He divides his commentary into seven chapters, the first of which discusses the book's introduction. The remaining six chapters deal with the individual sections of the poem. Each section unfolds the linguistic meaning of the text and its poetic imagery along with its underlying cultural/ Ancient Near Eastern background. Hess concludes each of the six sections with a discussion of its theological implications for Christians today. He adeptly demonstrates how Hebrew word usage in other parts of the Old Testament informs the usage of those same Hebrew words in the Song of Songs. He gently dismisses allegorical interpretations of the poetic imagery and instead views the poem as a celebration of love as it is fully expressed within the covenant of marriage. His insights regarding the contemporary relevance of Song of Songs for Christians, particularly in the theological sections, are superb! They provide excellent guidance both for preaching and for teaching the book's message. Pastors and teachers could easily craft an excellent series of six sermons (one for each of the major sections) for a marriage seminar using Hess' commentary, which successfully dispels the myth that Song of Songs is inappropriate for public teaching and preaching. He advocates a high view of the marriage covenant and the fulfillment/enjoyment/impact of love (and its various expressions) within that relationship as a gift intended to honor God who gave it. He emphasizes how love's full expression within the marriage covenant is a picture of Christ's love for the Church without attempting to overspiritualize or allegorize every symbol (a tactic that some overly sanctimonious interpreters of this book have tried to do throughout the history of its interpretation). This commentary not only helps readers gain a better understanding of the book's intended meaning, but also of its place within the canon of Scripture. It is a welcome corrective for a Church that is being increasingly ravaged from within by sexual promiscuity, adultery and divorce. Highly recommended for pastors, teachers and laypeople!!!
Gtonydne
Great
Brialelis
In light of the dozens of scholarly commentaries on the Song of
Song, the work by Professor Hess is concise and careful. He provides excellent footnotes supporting his interpretive
strategies as well as the most balanced summary of the interpretation and dating questions of this book of the Bible.
The strength of the book is that it recognizes theological as well as literal approaches as equally valid. For a student who wishes to read a solid introduction to the Song of Songs, I
recommend this volume
Freaky Hook
This book arrived before time and is great condition.My husband is so proud. It is what he expected thanks
Yadon
This commentary was very hard to understand. This has been the only book in 3 years that did not help me in my Bible Lessons.
Bad Sunny
I've really marked up my copy of this book. As a research writer, it has been invaluable in understanding what the words mean. Hess also deals with word plays in the Hebrew that we miss in our English Bibles. He takes the 1-man position, that the story is about a married couple. I take the 2-man position that King Solomon and the Shepherd are 2 different people and the Shulammite maiden is struggling with whom to marry. Even so, Hess' treatment of the word definitions and the flow of the Hebrew language make this a great research reference. Am so glad I bought it.
I had Dr. Hess as a professor at Denver Seminary. He's good.