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eBook Exodus (New International Biblical Commentary) download

by James K. Bruckner

eBook Exodus (New International Biblical Commentary) download ISBN: 1565632125
Author: James K. Bruckner
Publisher: Hendrickson Pub (April 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 348
ePub: 1598 kb
Fb2: 1854 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf rtf doc mobi
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

James K. Bruckner is professor of Old Testament at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago and is an ordained minister in the Evangelical Covenant Church.

By (author) James K Bruckner. James K.

1565632125 (ISBN13: 9781565632127).

Based on the widely used New International Version translation, the NIBC presents careful section-by-section exposition with key terms and phrases highlighted and all Hebrew transliterated.

James K. Bruckner is professor of Old Testament at North Park .

Brueggemann, Walter, The New Interpreter’s Bible: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Vol. 1 (Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1994). Janzen, J. Gerald, Westminster Bible Companion: Exodus (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 1997).

Exodus by James K. Bruckner and Publisher Baker Academic. Exodus by James K. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781441238337, 1441238336.

New International Version. Exodus 1. The Israelites Oppressed. 1These are the names of the sons of Israel who went to Egypt with Jacob, each with his family: 2 Reuben, Simeon, Levi and Judah; 3 Issachar, Zebulun and Benjamin; 4 Dan and Naphtali; Gad and Asher

New International Version. 1These are the names of the sons of Israel who went to Egypt with Jacob, each with his family: 2 Reuben, Simeon, Levi and Judah; 3 Issachar, Zebulun and Benjamin; 4 Dan and Naphtali; Gad and Asher. 5 The descendants of Jacob numbered seventy in all; Joseph was already in Egypt. 6 Now Joseph and all his brothers and all that generation died, 7 but the Israelites were exceedingly fruitful; they multiplied greatly, increased in numbers and became so numerous that the land was filled with them.

View Colossians 1:13-14. The outworking of divine grace within the history of the faith community is first of all understood by Paul as God's rescue of sinners from the dominion of the evil one. The special vocabulary of this of the saints" (1:12), rescued us, brought us into the kingdom, redemption, the forgiveness of sins-employs the "terminology of conversion.

The New International Bible Commentary offers the best of contemporary scholarship in a format that both general readers and serious students can use with profit.

Based on the widely used New International Version translation, the NIBC presents careful section-by-section exposition with key terms and phrases highlighted and all Hebrew transliterated. A separate section of notes at the close of each chapter provides additional textual and technical comments. Each commentary also includes a selected bibliography as well as Scripture and subject indexes.

Comments: (3)
Felolune
Bruckner writes his commentary by weaving Scripture into the actual commentary so you always know where you are. 5 Stars because he doesn't get 'technical' or drawn off into the weeds over certain things that others do (early or late exodus, etc.). Written from a conservative point of view, Bruckner draws you into the story and the epic events where you sense that you are right in the middle of it.
Tantil
phenomenal. have loved the insights, best Bible commentary I've used.
Jazu
I chose this commentary to read in conjunction with our Bible Study group's discussion of the book of Exodus, and it turned out to be an excellent choice. Part of a series (formerly called the New International Biblical Commentary) of relatively short general audience Christian commentaries, it concentrates on the literary and theological meaning of the text in its final form.

James Bruckner, the author, could be called a "second generation" commentator on Exodus, since Terence Fretheim, his thesis advisor, has also written an Exodus commentary. Not surprisingly, this commentary reflects Fretheim's emphasis on the creational nature of biblical ethics. It also includes insights from Bruckner's research on "implied law" in the pre-Sinai narratives of Genesis and Exodus.

Bruckner interacts with a number of other commentators, too, both Christian (Durham, Brueggemann, Childs, Enns) and Jewish (Houtman, Sarna, Jacob, Plaut, Nechama Leibowitz).

Highlights of the commentary for me included:

1) The explanation of Exodus 2:12. When Moses "saw that there was no man," he was concerned for the sake of justice, as in Isa 59:15-16, rather than hoping to get away with murder.

2) The discussion of God's patience and wisdom in teaching the Israelites in Exodus 16.

3) The sections on the meaning of each of the ten commandments, with the comments on the tenth commandment being especially insightful.

4) The helpful discussion of the Book of the Covenant (Exod 20-23), including comparisons with other Ancient Near Eastern legal codes. (Here Bruckner draws upon the work of Joe M. Sprinkle.)

5) The six-page section on the revelation of God's merciful character in Exodus 34:6-7.

6) Insightful comments on the theological lessons from the tabernacle instructions and their execution.

My favorite commentary in the Understanding the Bible Series is the Deuteronomy volume by Christopher Wright. This Exodus volume is also excellent.