carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Lamentations and the Song of Songs: A Theological Commentary on the Bible (Belief: A Theological Commentary on the Bible)

eBook Lamentations and the Song of Songs: A Theological Commentary on the Bible (Belief: A Theological Commentary on the Bible) download

by Harvey Cox

eBook Lamentations and the Song of Songs: A Theological Commentary on the Bible (Belief: A Theological Commentary on the Bible) download ISBN: 0664233023
Author: Harvey Cox
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press (April 1, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1549 kb
Fb2: 1278 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf rtf doc mobi
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

Harvey Cox tackles the book of Lamentations and Stephanie Paulsell writes on the SONG of SONGS.

Harvey Cox tackles the book of Lamentations and Stephanie Paulsell writes on the SONG of SONGS. All of his short chapters get the reader to really think about these subjects, and chapter 5, WHEN IS MOURNING REAL? is one of the best in the entire book. Cox seems to believe that Jeremiah didn't write Lamentations, which is certainly his perogative to do, but to say.

The Song of Songs has historically been seen as pointing to Christ's love for the church and interpreted allegorically. Theologian Harvey Cox finds the book of Lamentations to be shockingly current

The Song of Songs has historically been seen as pointing to Christ's love for the church and interpreted allegorically. Theologian Harvey Cox finds the book of Lamentations to be shockingly current. Drawing on a wide array of sources from poetry, novels, films, paintings, and photography to classical and contemporary theology, Cox offers a contemporary reading of Lamentations that is provocative and sure to stir numerous theological reflections and responses.

This series is an invaluable resource for those who want to probe beyond the backgrounds and words of biblical texts to their deep theological and ethical meanings for the church today. Miguel A. De La Torre. Westminster John Knox Press, 2011, Hardcover.

By Harvey Cox and Stephanie Paulsell. Belief Series Cox discusses some of the theological and ethical issues posed by the book: the absence of God, the significance of memory, the problem of evil, and th. . Harvey Cox, on the other hand, begins his study of Lamentations by drawing on personal reflections challenging the American nation to reexamine its bellicosity in view of the aftermath of World War II in Germany, based on his observations of the book. Cox discusses some of the theological and ethical issues posed by the book: the absence of God, the significance of memory, the problem of evil, and the ramifications of war for the twenty-first centuiy. De La Torre, Miguel A. Genesis.

Genesis by Miguel A. Lamentations and the Song of Songs by Harvey Cox and Stephanie Paulsell. Mark by William C. Placher. Luke by Justo L. González.

Publisher: Westminster John Knox. Genesis by Miguel A.

In Lamentations, well-known theologian Harvey Cox draws on a wide array of sources including poetry, novels, films, paintings, and photography to offer a contemporary theological reading of Lamentations which is provocative and sure to stir numerous theological reflections and responses. The biblical book of Song of Songs has historically been seen as a book pointing to Christ s love for the church and has been interpreted in allegorical ways.

Partner with the BLB (Disclaimer). We have provided this method as a convenience to our users. The Blue Letter Bible ministry and the BLB Institute hold to the historical, conservative Christian faith, which includes a firm belief in the inerrancy of Scripture. Since the text and audio content provided by BLB represent a range of evangelical traditions, all of the ideas and principles conveyed in the resource materials are not necessarily affirmed, in total, by this ministry.

Life of David in the Psalms.

Words in boxes are from the Bible. A word list at the end explains words with a star by them. We call this book Lamentations because it is a collection of sad poems. The five poems are about Jerusalem. God wanted his people to take care of Jerusalem and the special house in it. That house was the temple. God wanted the Jews to worship him there.

In Lamentations, well-known theologian Harvey Cox draws on a wide array of sources including poetry, novels, films, paintings, and photography to offer a contemporary theological reading of Lamentations which is provocative and sure to stir numerous theological reflections and responses.

The biblical book of Song of Songs has historically been seen as a book pointing to Christ's love for the church and has been interpreted in allegorical ways. Author Stephanie Paulsell suggests that the Song can still have profound meaning for us, teaching us "to love not only what we can see shining on the surface but also those depths of the other which are out of our reach."

Comments: (2)
Micelhorav
At one look, one will have asked questions why both of these Old Testament books are lumped together. They seem to be miles apart in terms of their emotional appeal. Lamentations are from the weeping prophet Jeremiah, while the Songs of Solomon are a joyous declaration of passionate love between two lovers. Lamentations sinks deep into the mire of despair and depression while the Songs attempt the heights of joyful love. One is a lament while the other is a song. Two seemingly contrasting books that are placed side by side makes this volume an interesting combination.

This book is intended to be a theological resource for the Church and believers at large. It is hoped that the commentary will complement and encourage diligent study of the Bible through informed reading that is appreciative of the contexts behind each book. Rather than making this commentary another historical treatise or an encyclopedia of the contexts behind the two books, it aims at a theological interpretation of Lamentations and the Song of Songs. Working with theologies laid out in hymns, Church creeds, and other resources, the authors aim at an interpretation of the book that understands the past, grapple with present issues, and to build a bridge for application and meaning for the now and the future. The list of references is formidable, with a collection of some of the best scholarship and academic authority available in the English speaking world.

LAMENTATIONS
=============
Instead of calling it a commentary on Lamentations, the authors take on a "considered appreciation of a timeless masterpiece." Using the "ruined cities" imagery of the past, the authors invite readers to journey together to discover and to participate in lamenting the pains and sufferings mankind has faced through sicknesses, wars, injustices, and reasons to weep for the broken world. Three theological issues are considered, namely:

1) God and the perceived absence of God
2) Spiritual significance of memory
3) The problem of evil / Theodicy

The authors use these three theological issues to deal with six ethical matters (Rape, torture, exile, starvation, humiliation, pornography and war). In the final part, they provide commentary of what it means at a theological application level. Here they give us reflections on modern prosperity, community or the lack of it, revenge and reconciliation, healing, and the place of Jerusalem today. Interestingly, they conclude this part with thoughts on Hitler, the WWII Holocaust, 9/11, and pleads for readers to learn to use Lamentations not as a way to solve these issues, but to learn to experience pain and show solidarity with the suffering.

SONG OF SONGS
=============
It is not easy to find a theological understanding from what seems like love poems. Rather than hemming in the book into any one categories, the authors choose to go with the flow of appreciating each human emotion of love. The physical and the emotional blends together with any intellectual understanding. It is a book of emotion as it enables one to experience the heights of joy and happiness. It is a book of sensuality as it details the different ways in which the emotions are described in physical terms. It is a book of love relationships as we read of a love that is stronger than death. It is a book of devotion in the sense that we can use the Song of Songs to point us to the Great God of Love. Using imageries of Sabbath, Jerusalem, vineyards, the incarnation, and many more, the authors enable modern readers to learn to appreciate this rarely preached book.

This is a highly readable theological volume to accompany the teaching or the preaching of Lamentations and the Song of Songs. I find it extremely helpful not only in pulpit planning or course structuring, but also in terms of personal devotional reading. The theological underpinnings drawn out are by themselves worth the price of the book.

conrade
This book is provided to me free by Westminster John Knox Press and NetGalley without any obligation for a positive review. All opinions offered above are mine unless otherwise stated or implied.
Delagamand
The BELIEF commentary series from WJK is one of the best, and the latest is no exception.

Harvey Cox tackles the book of Lamentations and Stephanie Paulsell writes on the SONG of SONGS.

Cox's commentary isn't a verse by verse one, but instead consists of such tough topics as torture, rape, war, evil, and revenge. All of his short chapters get the reader to really think about these subjects, and chapter 5, WHEN IS MOURNING REAL? is one of the best in the entire book.

Cox seems to believe that Jeremiah didn't write Lamentations, which is certainly his perogative to do, but to say that "most" scholars agree that he didn't write it seems a bit outlandish.

Also he refers to the author of Lamentations as the Poet, but throughout refers to the Poet as "she," (34, 47, 48, 55, 59, 62, 89, 95, 111, 119, 135, 148, 153) but at least one other times as "he or she." (53)

Would've been better if he had simply left it as "the Poet" without referring to he or she.

Paulsell's commentary on the Song of Songs is a verse by verse compilation, and she writes in great detail and makes the book come alive.

Overall a good read.