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eBook Run to Win the Prize: Perseverance in the New Testament download

by Thomas R. Schreiner

eBook Run to Win the Prize: Perseverance in the New Testament download ISBN: 1433514362
Author: Thomas R. Schreiner
Publisher: Crossway (May 5, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1111 kb
Fb2: 1450 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit azw doc lit
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

First, Schreiner insists that the New Testament does teach perseverance. Schreiner’s book sounds a clear call for all saints to recognize that God warns us sternly to remain in the faith, and God works in us, even using those warnings, to keep us in the faith.

First, Schreiner insists that the New Testament does teach perseverance. He argues that a person genuinely saved by God will remain saved. At no point does Schreiner allow for a view that holds that we keep ourselves saved by good works-a form of legalistic works righteousness.

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize. This is a great book on the warning passages in the New Testament. Clari Scripture's commands to persevere, and warnings of the consequences if we fail, have been met with apathy by some, and led others to doubt the state of their salvation. Schreiner, himself a believer in perseverance of the saints, argues that the reformed faith has often not taken these passages of scripture seriously enough and thus has missed out on the benefit that these admonitions can have in reminding us of the seriousness of sin the utmost importance of avoiding it at all costs.

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the . In the first story I related above, I told the new believer that she was saved no matter what she did. Is this a proper way to speak to new believers?

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize. Clarifying misunderstandings stemming from his more detailed treatment in The Race Set Before Us (IVP 2001), Schreiner draws together an illuminating overview of biblical teaching on the doctrine of perseverance. Those looking for a general treatment of the doctrine of perseverance will profit from the challenges and assurances in Run to Win the Prize. Is this a proper way to speak to new believers?

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the . The book is a must read for these times. A master New Testament theologian, Tom Schreiner offers an education in biblical interpretation and sound words of pastoral counsel.

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize

Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize. Schreiner details how God directs the collective warnings and exhortations of Scripture toward believers as a means of preservation. We are to think of the call to persevere in light of the initial call to faith, both agents by which God leads us to final salvation. Run To Win The Prize: Perseverance in the New Testament.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Big Truths of God.

The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance & Assurance. Thomas R. Schreiner, Ardel B. Caneday.

book by Thomas R. Schreiner. Covenant and God's Purpose for the World. The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance & Assurance.

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perseverance in the New Testament. by Thomas R. Published 2010 by Crossway Books in Wheaton, IL.

perseverance in the New Testament. Written in English. Perseverance (Theology), Biblical teaching.

Scripture's commands to persevere, and warnings of the consequences if we fail, have been met with apathy by some, and led others to doubt the state of their salvation. The fearful and eternal nature of these issues warrants careful examination of what the Bible says about perseverance. Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize. Clarifying misunderstandings stemming from his more detailed treatment in The Race Set Before Us (IVP 2001), Schreiner draws together an illuminating overview of biblical teaching on the doctrine of perseverance.

Schreiner details how God directs the collective warnings and exhortations of Scripture toward believers as a means of preservation. We are to think of the call to persevere in light of the initial call to faith, both agents by which God leads us to final salvation. Those looking for a general treatment of the doctrine of perseverance will profit from the challenges and assurances in Run to Win the Prize.

Comments: (7)
Lucam
Short but good book explaining the "warnings as means" view, defending and explaining the perseverance of the saints and avoiding the errors of easy believism. One could misunderstand his position as a works-based salvation, but Schreiner goes at lengths to explain that works are not what save us and that it is Christ's righteousness that saves us. Perseverance is the result and outworking of salvation, not the cause of it. Because we are saved, we will persevere by God's grace (and warnings are part of that grace). This is very different from saying perseverance is what saves us.
Billy Granson
Thomas Schreiner's book is based a on a series of lectures that he gave about the P in Calvin's tulip, the perseverance of the saints. He discusses the warning passages in the book of Hebrews and warnings from other texts and concludes that they are legitimate warnings to Christians to stay faithful to Christ or be judged at the last day.

He clarifies by saying that true Christians will eventually and invariably heed these warnings, and that God uses the warning passages to preserve His saints. Those who irreparably fall away were not true Christians to begin with, based on Dr Schreiner's reading of 1 John 2:18-19 and Matthew 7:21-23.

The book is very pastoral and wise and will help believers see why obedience is an important part of God's sanctifying work in our lives.
Cordalas
This book is a follow up on the author's previous book "The Race Set Before Us". The language is not that technical and thus easier to understand. I agree with most of his points of view.
Fenrikasa
The doctrine of the perseverance of the saints is an important teaching in the word of God. At the same time, this doctrine is often misunderstood or caricatured to the detriment of those who misunderstand it. Thomas Schreiner, author and seminary professor, attempts to clarify this doctrine in a simple and accessible way in Run to Win the Prize.

Run to Win the Prize is a condensed and simplified version of a larger work entitled The Race Set Before Us: A Biblical Theology of Perseverance and Assurance by Schreiner and Caneday. At the same time, Run to Win the Prize is an attempt by Schreiner to respond to some misconceptions about the conclusions of the larger and more exhaustive work on the topic. But readers need not fear that this shorter version is unhelpful. Schreiner uses the smaller book size to great effect as he helps readers to consider some very important perspectives on perseverance.

First, Schreiner insists that the New Testament does teach perseverance. He argues that a person genuinely saved by God will remain saved. At no point does Schreiner allow for a view that holds that we keep ourselves saved by good works—a form of legalistic works righteousness. Nor does Schreiner ever offer a view that Christians who are genuine Christians can ever end up ultimately lost.

Often, when people hear a strong message of eternal security for the saved, they will respond with a twisting caricature of the doctrine. Opponents will claim that a person can pray a prayer, be saved, and then live however sinfully they want without consequence. Schreiner’s work speaks boldly against this view by arguing that the warning passages in Scripture are very real, very serious, and intended for believers.

Many Christians interpret passages such as the opening verses of Hebrews 6 as passages intended for people considering Christianity, but who are not yet converted. They, if they turn from grace, will be lost. Others suggest that the warning texts teach that someone can lose their salvation by intentionally walking away. Schreiner offers a third option.

Schreiner suggests that the warning passages are genuinely for Christians. He argues that the passages say exactly what they want to say, warning that a believer who intentionally turns from Christ and walks away will be lost. But Schreiner adds the biblical perspective that no genuine believer actually will make such a turn against the Lord. Schreiner argues that the warnings, genuine warnings, are means that the Lord uses to keep genuine believers. Like warnings on bottles of poison that declare to a person, “If you drink this you will die,” the warnings in Scripture, Schreiner argues, tell believers that if they turn from Jesus they will die. And, Schreiner argues, just as you and I would never drink the poison because of the warning, neither will genuine Christians ever turn against Christ so as to fall away eternally.

Schreiner also addresses briefly the misconception that an understanding of the doctrine of perseverance of the saints leads to a Wesleyan doctrine of perfectionism. The author is clear that he is not in any way teaching any form of sinless perfection among saints before the eschaton. Instead, he argues that believers are warned by God and kept by God. Believers will grow and be sanctified. But Believers will not be perfected until they leave this life.

I found Run to Win the Prize to be thoughtful, encouraging, and helpful. Personally, I am not certain that I agree with Dr. Schreiner regarding the audience for all of the warning passages. I believe it is possible that some of the passages are for those who have been exposed to Christianity, are considering it, are understanding its truth, but who are tempted to reject Jesus and walk to the Jewish temple religion (obviously pre AD 70). But, even if I disagree there, I must be humble enough to allow Dr. Schreiner to cause me to think my conclusions through thoroughly.

For sure, this book is a great help for believers in showing us that a true understanding of eternal security, perseverance of the saints, does not do away with our call to obedience and sanctification. Schreiner’s book sounds a clear call for all saints to recognize that God warns us sternly to remain in the faith, and God works in us, even using those warnings, to keep us in the faith.
Thetalas
With all the confusion going on regarding the nature of perseverance in Christian theologies today, Thomas Schreiner, a NT professor at SBTS, has written a short but very informative book on the doctrine of perseverance. He engages closely with the biblical text and gives responsible answers on why the biblical writers required that believers persevere to the end to receive eternal life. In contrast to his previous book on perseverance (which he co-authored with Ardel Caneday) this book is more geared towards the average layperson than a scholar or seminary student (though scholars and students can still benefit from this book). It is not a heavy or long book. In fact, it is only 128 pages long with five chapters.

The book opens up with the first chapter discussing why this issue is a very important topic in ministry. Why it is important for Christians to understand the biblical warnings rightly for their own spiritual walk and witness. Schreiner gives two personal examples that led him to believe why this issue is so important for Christians to a have proper understanding of.

The second chapter deals with how readers of Scripture should understand the warning passages in Scripture. In this chapter, he engages and critiques the views of the Free Grace position of Zane Hodges, Charles Ryrie, and Charles Stanley (that the warning passages don't deal with salvation but only loss of rewards in heaven), and the traditional Reformed position that the warning passages describe only false professors (that the warnings are retrospective rather than prospective). He then gives his own view on why the warnings are addressed to true believers and what the eternal consequences are of failing to heed these warnings (which he calls "the means of salvation" view). According to Schreiner, the warnings are given as means to eschatological salvation so that believers will persevere to the end and not be condemned at the last judgment.

The third chapter deals with the nature of Christian perseverance in relation to the ongoing struggle with sin. Schreiner does a good job telling us why biblical perseverance cannot be the same as perfectionism. In fact, he states that truly regenerate believers still struggle with sin in this life (as shown by the life of Samson) and that perfection from sin can only be obtained in heaven. However, this doesn't mean that true believers should not heed the warnings in Scripture. Though all true believers (even mature ones) still struggle with sin on this side of eternity they will not, however, totally and finally abandon the faith (and the warnings are one of the means to ensure that).

The fourth chapter deals with the issue of perseverance and works-righteousness salvation. Schreiner here again does an able job of disproving the notion that the necessity of perseverance is not the same as works-salvation. He uses the Epistles of Galatians and Hebrews to prove his point. That apostasy is not the same as our daily struggle with sin but a direct repudiation of the faith - which includes abandoning Christ and the gospel for another religious system (i.e., the OT law). Hence, perseverance and works-salvation are not the same because the latter looks away (fully or partially) from Christ and his work of salvation.

The fifth chapter deals with faith, warnings, and assurance. Here he deals a little with the aberrant Federal Vision theology and evangelical Arminianism. He, rightly, states that the FV view of the warnings are flawed because they put a disjunction between being elect and being a member of the new covenant (contra Jeremiah 31:31-34). He rightly points out, against the FV people, that one cannot have one's sins forgiven, given the Holy Spirit, and be part of the new covenant and be non-elect. He also rightly criticizes the Arminian view of perseverance because it doesn't seriously take the "eternal security" passages in Scripture like John 6:37, 44; 10:28-29; Romans 8:35-39; and Philippians 1:6 as they are. Schreiner rightly points out that the warnings are given to believers to keep them on the narrow path of faith and assure them that they are on the right path to glory. Those who are elect will take these warnings seriously, persevere, and receive eternal life at the end. This is not works-salvation because the foundation of a believer's forgiveness and justification is Christ's perfect righteousness and sacrifice on the cross.

Overall, I would highly recommend this short book to ministers, students, and laypeople alike. In an age where much of evangelicalism has fallen into various forms of watered-down gospel preaching and seeker-friendly methods this book is a good reminder (and jolt) of what it means to be a true follower of Christ. Though Scripture decries any type of legalism or perfectionism (even Lot and Samson were saved individuals despite their spiritual flaws) it also warns us that the Christian life is not a life of shallow belief and superficial spirituality. Jesus Christ warned us in Matthew 7:21-23 of the dangers of false profession, and this book will remind us that only those who persevere to the end in true faith will be found among the redeemed company to enjoy the blessings of eternal salvation at the end.