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eBook The Book of Amos: A Commentary (The Old Testament Library) download

by Jorg Jeremias

eBook The Book of Amos: A Commentary (The Old Testament Library) download ISBN: 066422086X
Author: Jorg Jeremias
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press; American ed. edition (May 1, 2016)
Language: English
Pages: 198
ePub: 1612 kb
Fb2: 1946 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

While he does write from a critical perspective, his creativity offers a sensitivity to literary issues within the text that is often missing from critical work. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

This book reflects the multilayered history of transmission traversed by Amos' message . Jorg Jeremias is Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Phillips University in Marburg, Germany.

This book reflects the multilayered history of transmission traversed by Amos' message over the course of numerous centuries. But difficulties attaching to any multilayered textual reading also imply a significant advantage for the contemporary reader. Books, eBooks & Audio.

The contributors are scholars of international standing. Format Paperback 285 pages.

The Book of Amos is the third of the Twelve Minor Prophets in the Tanakh/Old Testament and the second in the Greek Septuagint tradition. Amos, an older contemporary of Hosea and Isaiah, was active c. 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II (788–747 BC), making Amos the first prophetic book of the Bible to be written. Amos lived in the kingdom of Judah but preached in the northern kingdom of Israel. His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy.

The Book of Amos is an intriguing Scripture from a unique individual, Amos, a shepherd and fig tree farmer dwelling in southern Judah who is called by God to go to Bethel and announce warnings of judgment to the northern kingdom of Israel. Northern Israel had conquered other nations and enjoyed its recent successes, but was spiritually bankrupt on the inside. Worshiping local pagan gods twisted their moral perceptions, and the people of Israel infamously cheated, stole and sold their poor into slavery in foreign lands. Carol A. Newsom, Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament, Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Brent A. Strawn, Professor of Old Testament, Candler School of Theology at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Studying the Scriptures. Old Testament Reading Chart. Welcome to the Old Testament. The Books of Genesis, Moses, and Abraham. Prepared by the Church Educational System Published by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Salt Lake City, Utah.

The prophet Amos ministered during the overlapping reigns of Jeroboam II in Israel .

The prophet Amos ministered during the overlapping reigns of Jeroboam II in Israel (793-753) and Uzziah in Judah (792-740). His ministry occurred sometime between 760 and 755 . Amos prophesied at a unique time in the history of the divided kingdom. The works of J. A. Motyer, Gary V. Smith, and James Boice, in particular, should be useful to many.

Agbeya: the Coptic Book of Prayers.

In this volume, Jeremias suggests that the book of Amos was produced through various stages over time. While he does write from a critical perspective, his creativity offers a sensitivity to literary issues within the text that is often missing from critical work.

The Old Testament Library provides fresh and authoritative treatments of important aspects of Old Testament study through commentaries and general surveys. The contributors are scholars of international standing.

Comments: (4)
Nikohn
The Old Testament Library Series is one of my favorite commentary sets. I appreciated the scholarship contained therein and admire the commitment to theological integrity modeled by the publisher of this series.
Steel_Blade
great
Zahisan
Dr. J. Jeremias' scholarship of this first "writing" prophet, Amos, critical text is superb scholarship. He handles the usual burden of the historical commentaries which precede his commentary with the usual aplomb and diligence one requires of a Commentator on the ancient classical Hebrew texts.

This is a book one must have in one's library, if one is a serious student of Hebrew theological literature and scribal literary culture. The 'real' portions of the texts by the Eighth century [860-850 B.C.E.] Prophet demand reading by our age as we enter our "evil times"; his message is simple if one is to improve one's society: love the good and hate the evil!

I will add more to this review as I re-read his commentary for the fourth time; furthermore, I must re-read the Hebrew text (which I am currently doing) carefully. Amos has been in my consciousness for more than 30 years; one never grows tired of reading and re-reading the Hebrew text with its delicacies of grammar, rhetorical style and sublime poetical structures [assonance, inclusio, repetition, woe oracles, divine & prophetic oracles, etc].

Respectfully,

John E.D.P. Malin
Chairman of the Board
Informatica Corporation
School Street
P. O. Drawer 460
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Daron
I enjoyed this author's commentaries on the book of Amos. I felt that he dug deeply into ancient history to provide a good insight for this book.