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eBook The Song of Songs [Song of Solomon] (Continental Commentary Series) download

by Othmar Keel

eBook The Song of Songs [Song of Solomon] (Continental Commentary Series) download ISBN: 0800695070
Author: Othmar Keel
Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers; 1st Fortress Press ed edition (September 1, 1994)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1522 kb
Fb2: 1710 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: doc azw lrf mobi
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

He makes full use of parallels-textual and iconographic-from Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia.

He makes full use of parallels-textual and iconographic-from Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia. Pages: 308 pages Publisher: Fortress Press Published: 1997 ISBN-10: 0800695070 ISBN-13: 9780800695071

The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon or Canticles (Hebrew: שִׁיר הַשִּׁירִים Šîr Haššîrîm, Greek and Ancient Greek: Ἆισμα Ἀισμάτων, romanized: Âisma Āismátōn; Latin: Canticum Canticorum), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section.

The Song of Songs, also Song of Solomon or Canticles (Hebrew: שִׁיר הַשִּׁירִים Šîr Haššîrîm, Greek and Ancient Greek: Ἆισμα Ἀισμάτων, romanized: Âisma Āismátōn; Latin: Canticum Canticorum), is one of the megillot (scrolls) found in the last section of the Tanakh, known as the Ketuvim (or "Writings"), and a book of the Old Testament

Meaning and Interpretation. the background for the Song was Abishag’s subsequent love for a man other than Solomon

Meaning and Interpretation. the background for the Song was Abishag’s subsequent love for a man other than Solomon. Near the end of David’s life, Solomon’s brother Adonijah had attempted to be crowned as king, but he had not received his father David’s blessing.

Othmar Keel is Professor of Old Testament at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland

Translator: Frederick J. Gaiser. Publisher: Fortress Press. Publication Date: 1994. Pages: 320. About Othmar Keel. Othmar Keel is Professor of Old Testament at the University of Freiburg, Switzerland. He is the author of The Symbolism of the Biblical World.

In addition to a comprehensive introduction and an analysis of text and form, Othmar Keel focuses on the metaphorical and symbolic language of the Song of Songs. He makes full use of parallels-textual and iconographic-from Palestine, Egypt, and Mesopotamia. More than 160 illustrations, prepared by Hildi Keel-Leu, add to the interpretation of the songs.
Comments: (3)
Fesho
By edition of the book came in a sleeve that was tan, black, and titled in red. The book was essentially a study in cultural relativism. That's all I took from it; that and the author's posturing to be an expert in ancient poetry. So be it. I will say this: it isn't heresy to interpret the Song of Songs as love poetry, introducing true Sons of Abraham to the discovery, trials, and conclusion of youthful love. That was their historic context, and God penned them from eternity. If these anticipate Christ and the Church, so be it. We aren't at the feast yet. Until then, we have love for what it is, which is splendid and set apart for one man and one woman, only culminated in marriage. But love is also a passion that can be hurtful and trying. I'm sorry I didn't get that much from this book, or the author's learning, but I wanted any readers of this comment thread to be encouraged there is an inspired guide for our love passions: one who lived them, conquered them, and put them off for the Kingdom's sake. His guide and encouragement to steadfast lovers is found in scripture. That's all.
porosh
I bought this book a couple of months ago. For my money, Garrett's WBC commentary on Song is still numero uno. However, Garrett references many of the excellent line illustrations in Keel's book. Most of Keel's line illustrations are based on paintings and sculptures whose photographic reproductions are available on the internet--after some searching. Speaking of searching, Keel constantly refers to figures in his own book without giving their page numbers, hence considerable paging is required. (But what a delight to page through all those distracting pictures!) Nevertheless, you will find that Keel offers, in just one volume, a quick(er) look than an internet search.

Garrett is by far the better interpreter of Hebrew poetry. Consider 8:2, for example. Both commentators seem to agree on what "mother's house" means, but Keel's interpretation is colder, less imaginative, less consistent with context.

I recommend this book as a companion to Garrett's volume. My Garrett book has become cluttered with folded printouts from the internet, showing ancient pictures of palm trees, lotuses, mandrakes, goddesses mounting lions, etc. Now I can just page through Keel to see the line drawing. Welcome to the wonderful, exotic world of The Song of Songs!
INvait
I have used this commentary extensively and I really like the reliefs and references to the Egyptian love poetry. I recommend this commentary.