carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives (scm classics)

eBook Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives (scm classics) download

by Phyllis Trible

eBook Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives (scm classics) download ISBN: 0334029007
Author: Phyllis Trible
Publisher: SCM Press (May 12, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 146
ePub: 1787 kb
Fb2: 1668 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mbr mobi txt lrf
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

Home Browse Books Book details, Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings o. .

Home Browse Books Book details, Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings o.Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives. In her first book in this series, God and the Rhetoric of Sexuality (1978), Phyllis Trible offered a fresh way to listen to the text that permitted the text to have its own say, without excessive interpretive manipulation. By the time of this present book, Professor Trible has become established as one of the most effective practitioners of rhetorical criticism, and as perhaps the decisive voice in feminist exposition of biblical literature. The studies offered in this book are the substance of her Beecher Lectures at Yale.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. 质的量化与运动的量化:14世纪经院自然哲学的运动学初探.

Texts of Terror book. Trible takes four of the most disturbing Biblical examples of sexual violence against women, and exegetes them with a Christological lens. Buried under the violence, subjugation and silencing, Trible une While Trible's literary/rhetorical criticism asks a lot of an ancient, multi-sourced text, the endeavor is still humbling in scope and purpose. Published over 25 years ago now, Texts of Terror is still a shining example of feminist Biblical criticism, as well a work of deep faith, hope and compassion.

Phyllis Trible}, author {Jǒn Douglas Levenson}, year {1985} }. Jǒn Douglas Levenson.

Texts of Terror : Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives. Book in the Overtures to Biblical Theology Series). One seeks to just explore the biblical books, narratives, themes and characters relevant to modern woman situation.

Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Abstract views reflect the number of visits to the article landing page.

Phyllis Trible is an American educator, feminist, theologian, and author. She is best known for her groundbreaking works in feminist biblical scholarship - "God and the Rhetoric of Sexuality" (1978) and "Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives" (1984). Trible also lectured at numerous colleges and universities worldwide and was a visiting professor at Seinan Gakuin University, Fukuoka, Japan; University of Virginia; Boston University; Vancouver School of Theology; Brown University; Saint John’s University; University of Notre Dame; and lliff School of Theology, Denver, Colorado.

Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives (Overtures to Biblical Theology): Phyllis .

Texts of Terror: Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives (Overtures to Biblical Theology): Phyllis Trible. Literary Criticism Hebrew Bible Overture Professor Book Series Feminism Book Lists Texts Books Online. The premise of the book is simple: society places undue emphasis on the concepts of female purity and virginity (and these concepts don't even have a uniform understanding. Pop culture, politics, personality, and life with a feminist spin. The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai: 9780735223530 PenguinRandomHouse.

Since ancient tales of terror speak all to frighteningly of the present, Trible's aim is here to tell what she calls 'sad stories': tales of terror with women as victims

Since ancient tales of terror speak all to frighteningly of the present, Trible's aim is here to tell what she calls 'sad stories': tales of terror with women as victims. Belonging to the sacred scriptures of synagogue and church, these narratives yield four portraits of suffering in ancient Israel: Hagar, Tamar, an unnamed concubine and the daughter of Jephthah. While seeking to cross this land of terror, from which 'no traveller returns unscarred', the author knows that sad stories may inspire new beginnings

Since ancient tales of terror speak all to frighteningly of the present, Trible's aim is here to tell what she calls 'sad stories': tales of terror with women as victims. Belonging to the sacred scriptures of synagogue and church, these narratives yield four portraits of suffering in ancient Israel: Hagar, Tamar, an unnamed concubine and the daughter of Jephthah. While seeking to cross this land of terror, from which 'no traveller returns unscarred', the author knows that sad stories may inspire new beginnings. By interpreting stories of outrage on behalf of their female victims she recovers a neglected history, recalls a past that the present embodies, and prays that these terrors shall not come to pass again.
Comments: (7)
Nalme
I bought a used copy of Texts of Terror and found that, despite describing the condition as "Used - Very Good," the previous owner took a paper clip or something and carved on the cover under the title: "Very bias Account." I guess he didn't like it (maybe it wasn't a 'he'...maybe). I thought, to be fair, it does say "Literary-Feminist Readings of Biblical Narratives." The author introduces her bent right in the title, so why was he so surprised that he carved a warning on the cover before selling it?

After reading the book, I think the previous owner had to have much more of a bias than Trible does. In fact, I found it funny that Walter Brueggemann in his forward for the book said things like, "[Trible's] presentation is free of every theoretical encumbrance." (p.ix) Indeed, while her four chapters wrestle with sagas that are particularly troublesome for feminists (Hagar, Gen. 16:1-16, 21:9-21; Tamar, 2 Sam. 13:1-22; an unnamed concubine, Judg. 19:1-30; and the daughter of Jephthah, Judg. 11:29-40), she is very fair in her assessments of them, and does not impose some kind of agenda onto the texts.

In fact, Trible's treatment of the texts is where the quality of her work lies. We have here an example of rhetorical criticism in its purest form. Her attention to detail in analyzing the narratives often produced wonderful insights, so that no page was left insipid. For example, Judges 19:30--at the end of story about the unnamed concubine being captured, betrayed, raped, tortured, murdered, dismembered and scattered--says, "And all who saw it said, 'Such a thing has never happened or been seen from the day that the people of Israel came up out of the land of Egypt until this day.'" Trible observed that the "verbal forms and the object [of the verse] are all feminine gender,"which , she says, "highlight[s] the woman who is the victim of terror." (p.81) Just about every page includes interesting observations like this.

Trible's studies revealed a grand poetry of the biblical prose, a mark that must have influenced her own writing, as Texts of Terror is extremely well-written. When talking about the statement the editor of Judges made after the story of the unnamed concubine--"in those days there was no king in Israel, and every man did what was right in his own eyes"--Trible made a clever observation considering the Davidic monarchy: "David pollutes Bathsheba; Amnon rapes Tamar; and Absalom violates the concubines of his father. In those days there was a king in Israel, and royalty did the right in its own eyes." (p.84) The book is full of such clever word-play.

Her analysis of the sagas themselves is equally commendable. So many of the biblical narratives are written so that a lot happens in just a few verses. Trible slows it down. Each story as presented in her book is read with eagerness, as it moves along with a building intensity. She is a fantastic story-teller.

Going into her work, I was expecting an attempt to resolve the theological issues raised by the narratives she covers. Why did Yahweh tell Hagar to return to Abram and Sarai? Why didn't Yahweh intervene to tell Jephthah not to sacrifice his daughter like he did with Abraham and Isaac? However, theological issues are not the focus here. Trible's focus was to single out women in the Bible who suffered terrible defeats, and who have so often been unheard and overlooked in biblical study. She focused on giving a voice to the voiceless, in order for the reader to do the same. This, she accomplished, and she did it well.
Manazar
Oh Trible. This really was a hard, yet defining read. I read it as part of my Old Testament class and it was legitimately one of the hardest books I have ever read. It took me weeks to finish because I could only read a few pages, go cry and pray, and then recover. With that said, it is a necessary read for anyone who exists in this world- not just Christian or even those of Abrahamic faith. Rather, every single person needs to read this to understand how far we have come and yet how much we are still lacking.
Yggfyn
five stars for the fact the author takes these texts about and gives clarity and analysis to understanding Hagar, Tamar, Jephthah's daughter, and the butchered concubine. While the author does not resolve the tensions of these problematic texts, analysis allows the victimized and marginalized women a voice in light of patriarchal interpretations.
Dark_Sun
Phyllis Trible is incredible and this book is superb. If you are a student of the Bible and/or women's studies, this is a great addition to your library.
Siralune
It's hard to believe these stories were included in the Old Testament unless it was to show that women were considered less than human in those days. It certainly altered my view of the Old Testament.
Mataxe
Very informative and interesting account of Old Testament texts. I couldn't put it down!
Wire
Phyllis Trible brought the plight of these ancient women to heart breaking life with her examination of the text through the eyes of the mostly voiceless victims in scripture.
I'm in a book club and this is our book. TOUGH read. Not something I would normally pick. It is creating great discussions.