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eBook How the Bible Became a Book: The Textualization of Ancient Israel download

by William M. Schniedewind

eBook How the Bible Became a Book: The Textualization of Ancient Israel download ISBN: 0521829461
Author: William M. Schniedewind
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (May 10, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1157 kb
Fb2: 1102 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf txt rtf lit
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

The problem with this book is that ignores the religious concepts of the words in the bible.

The problem with this book is that ignores the religious concepts of the words in the bible. The initial oral preaching and later writing it down through oral transmission, so that it not be forgotten, has been known for at least 2,500 yrs. Scribes, even today, continue to copy the Hebrew Torah from generation to generation. The Torah's divine inspiration is excluded by the author.

WILLIAM M. SCHNIEDEWIND. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 11, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

How the Bible Became a Book: The Textualization of Ancient Israel (Cambridge, 2004), ISBN 0521536227.

in Religion from George Fox University in Newberg, Oregon, an . in Historical Geography of Ancient Israel, from Jerusalem University College, and an . How the Bible Became a Book: The Textualization of Ancient Israel (Cambridge, 2004), ISBN 0521536227.

This book seeks to answer three key questions about the formation of the Bible as a written text (. This book was recomended to me by a friend, so I gave it a shot. Schniedewind does a good job keeping the reader interested in the subject

This book seeks to answer three key questions about the formation of the Bible as a written text (. Schniedewind does a good job keeping the reader interested in the subject. though the author is arguing that the current understanding of the bible's heritage is false.

In a richly textured and revolutionary book, Schniedewind argues that the stories traditionally thought to have been written in the 10th and ninth centuries .

Title: How the Bible Became a Book: Textualization in Ancient Israel By: William M. Schniedewind Format: Hardcover Number of Pages: 272 Vendor: Cambridge University Press Publication Date: 2004. Dimensions: . X . (inches) Weight: 1 pound 1 ounce ISBN: 0521829461 ISBN-13: 9780521829465 Stock No: WW29460. Publisher's Description. In a richly textured and revolutionary book, Schniedewind argues that the stories traditionally thought to have been written in the 10th and ninth centuries . were most likely composed more than 100 years later.

Volume 62 Issue 2 - Joel M. LeMon. The higher education mobility of Palestinian Arab students from Israel has increased in recent years especially after the peace agreement between Israel and Jordan in 1994.

It describes an emerging literate society in ancient Israel that challenges the assertion that literacy first arose in Greece during the fifth century BCE. Hb ISBN (2004) 0-521-82946-1.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 4% restored. It describes an emerging literate society in ancient Israel that challenges the assertion that literacy first arose in Greece during the fifth century BCE. As a result, the written Bible has dwelled in an historical vacuum. Recent archaeological evidence and insights from linguistic anthropology, however, point to the earlier era of the late-Iron Age as the formative period for the writing of biblical literature

Ancient Christian Books & Bibles Education & Reference Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) .

Ancient Christian Books & Bibles Education & Reference Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) History Humanities Reference Religion Religion & Spirituality Religious History Religious Studies Sacred Writings. More by William M.

The social conditions for more widespread literacy in ancient Israel hit rather suddenly at the end of the eighth century

In his new book, How the Bible Became a Book: Textualization in Ancient Israel (Cambridge, 2004), William Schniedewind adds to this ongoing discussion the issue of the social conditions that allowed for the writing of the Bible. Most important for a discussion of the development of a written work is the question of readership. The social conditions for more widespread literacy in ancient Israel hit rather suddenly at the end of the eighth century. With the urban growth and influx into Jerusalem and the surrounding area of thousands of refugees from the Northern Kingdom-including its scribes, administrators, and of writing appears in Judah.

How the Bible Became a Book combines recent archaeological discoveries in the Middle East with insights culled from the history of writing to address how the Bible was written and evolved into sacred Scripture. Written for general readers as well as scholars, the book provides rich insight into how these texts came to possess the authority of Scripture and explores why Ancient Israel, an oral culture, began to write literature. It describes an emerging literate society in ancient Israel that challenges the assertion that literacy first arose in Greece during the fifth century BCE. Hb ISBN (2004) 0-521-82946-1
Comments: (7)
Tygralbine
Schniedewind uses archaeology and the study of literacy to argue against leading theories of when the Hebrew Bible was written. Most scholars have followed Julius Wellhausen in adopting a documentary hypothesis that focuses on J, E, D, and P documents. A great many scholars also emphasize the Persian period as the time when most of the Bible was written. Schniedewind counters these scholars by pointing to the limitation of literacy to palace and temple up to the days of Hezekiah. Thus, J, E, and P were oral traditions and not written documents. Wellhausen's claim that P was the latest of the four is countered by pointing out that P material shows no sign of being aware of traditions being written rather than oral, whereas Deuteronomy is very clear that key religious teachings are in writing. The Persian period, he maintains, was a dark age when few books of the Bible were developed. Part of the archaeology that supports this point is the proof that Aramaic rather than Hebrew became the ordinary language in Jewish lands under the Persians.

Most of the Hebrew Bible, says Schniedewind, was written down from the eighth through the sixth centuries B.C.E., the period from Isaiah to Jeremiah, centering on the policies of Kings Hezekiah and Josiah. Archaeology indicates that Judah underwent extensive urbanization following the conquest of Israel by Assyria, so that literate elites from Israel migrated into Judah and brought royal archives and traditions with them. Thus Hezekiah's period saw an emphasis on trying to blend the traditions of Israel and Judah, which resulted in glorifying the united kingdom of David and Solomon as a golden age which Hezekiah hoped to recapture. There was an agrarian rebellion that put Josiah on the throne, leading to writings that demoted the influence of Israel and its transplanted elites. At the same time, literacy spread and literature flourished leading to "one of the most profound cultural revolutions in human history: the assertion of the orthodoxy of texts." (p.91) From that time onward there was a tension between the oral tradition and the written holy text.

Among the interesting points Schniedewind makes is how the story of the Ten Commandments differs in Exodus and Deuteronomy. In Exodus, the commandments are oral rather than written. "Somehow the story of the revelation in Exodus 19-23 seems unaware that the Torah is a text. This fact will become all the more remarkable when we see how later traditions will be obsessed with telling the story of the writing of the Torah." (p. 121) His analysis of the narratives in Exodus and Deuteronomy leads him to conclude that the tablets Moses received contained plans for the tabernacle rather than the Ten Commandments.

The tension between oral tradition and the written text becomes an important theme from the time of Josiah. Schniedewind points out that the Book of Chronicles was the first text to apply the term "word of YHWH' to the written Torah rather than to words spoken by prophets. He maintains that the priesthood which ruled during the period of the second temple championed the written text as holy and that the Sadducees and Essenes were movements which focused on the written text. But, he says, the Pharisees, early Christians, and Rabbinic Judaism emphasized a key role for the oral tradition.

This is a book that can be enjoyed by the general public as well as biblical specialists. Anyone interested in Bible study will find his analyses enlightening. His focus on the spread of literacy and the transition from oral to textual culture adds a significant dimension to study and understanding of the Bible.
Umrdana
Well written and very interesting. Author is basically stating that ancient populations were mostly illiterate and relied on oral teachings for their information. As these cultures developed, different letter systems were used to write down these ancient oral teachings. These written books then took on a holy status when taught to the illiterate masses by the religious and political leadership of the time.
Even today, vast amounts of people still cannot read or write. Many people can speak a language but cannot write it. Many can write but cannot write properly. So the author's view is very plausible.
Most people today do not write books. This is usually done by highly educated professional writers who write books for other people, much like the scribes in ancient times.
The original testament , Torah, the teachings of Moses and the other writings of the Hebrews/Jews, is the telling of thousands of years of verbal teachings/histories that were eventually written down by scribes and edited by religious leaders for the final canonized version of the Hebrew Bible.
The Bible becomes no less holy or less the word of G-d because of this. The Bible is a morally based teaching and one which relates to future generations the need to love and respect your fellow human being. That this love and respect is not a condition allowed by man but required by a divine command that cannot be abrogated by Kings and human beings. It is an eternal law and is indeed the will of the eternal G-d who created all that exists.
Cha
Excellent information. I learned an enormous amount from this book! Well worth having. Good, significant scholarship and careful on the speculation. Grounded in actual evidence. Just the kind of perfect book for a rainy day.... a sunny one, a cloudy one, heck ANY day.
Samuhn
This book was a fantastic exploration of what archaeology and rational analysis indicate about when the bible was transcribed and complied. Along the way it gave great information about the early culture and history of the Jewish people. It answered many questions I had regarding the relationship between the invention of and early days of alphabetic writing, and the writing down of the bible. I would not recommend it for devout Christians and Jews who believe the bible was written by god. However, I do recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone who is interested in religion and the bible, but does not believe in magic and the supernatural.