carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Paul: An Outline of His Theology (English and Dutch Edition)

eBook Paul: An Outline of His Theology (English and Dutch Edition) download

by Herman N. Ridderbos

eBook Paul: An Outline of His Theology (English and Dutch Edition) download ISBN: 0802834388
Author: Herman N. Ridderbos
Publisher: Eerdmans Pub Co (October 1, 1975)
Language: English Dutch
Pages: 587
ePub: 1938 kb
Fb2: 1303 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt rtf docx mbr
Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

This book is misrepresented in what it claims to be about.

This book is misrepresented in what it claims to be about. Paul the Apostle of Jesus Christ, His Life and Work, His Epistles and His Doctrine. A Contribution to a Critical History of Primitive Christianity. 87 MB·2,836 Downloads·New! Using Paul's letter to the Romans as the foundation for his monumental study of Paul's theology. The Orthodox Study Bible. 12,301 Pages·2015·40. 06 MB·1,057 Downloads. Used by. George & Brenda Farah.

It offers extraordinary insights and information and presents an interpretation of Pauline theology that should be carefully considered and thoroughly discussed

It offers extraordinary insights and information and presents an interpretation of Pauline theology that should be carefully considered and thoroughly discussed.

It offers extraordinary insights and information and presents an interpretation of Pauline theology that should be carefully considered and thoroughly discussed.

Ridder The beginning chapter of Ridderbos' Paul: An Outline of His Theology is a very significant introduction in light he uncovers the various non-Christian philosophical influences and agenda behind multiple approaches to the Pauline studies where a "widespread group of interpreters.

Ridder The beginning chapter of Ridderbos' Paul: An Outline of His Theology is a very significant introduction in light he uncovers the various non-Christian philosophical influences and agenda behind multiple approaches to the Pauline studies where a "widespread group of interpreters, highly differentiated among themselves, who endeavor to understand the Pauline gospel in its original meaning and purport without subjecting its content.

In many ways this is the most comprehensive and thorough exposition of the teaching of the apostle Paul

In many ways this is the most comprehensive and thorough exposition of the teaching of the apostle Paul. Here we find sound exegesis, perceptive analysis, profound insight, and a humble listening to the voice of Paul. Pages: 587. ISBN 10: 0802844693. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

This is the English translation of the monumental study of the theology of the Apostle Paul by the Dutch theologian and Biblical scholar, Herman Ridderbos. Pages: 592 Publisher: Eerdmans Published: 1997 ISBN-10: 0802844693 ISBN-13: 9780802844699. Find at a Library Find at Google Books. Denver Seminary Journal December 5, 2009 . 5.

Topically arranged, Ridderbos exposes the structure and Paul's system and sheds a calm, thorough light on such matters as Paul's meaning of law/grace, flesh/spirit, present age/age to come.

Firmly grounded in a careful exegesis of the biblical text and crafted with constant reference to the wealth of scholarly study of Paul's writings, this volume is a standard for interpreters of Paul's thought and all students of the New Testament. Topically arranged, Ridderbos exposes the structure and Paul's system and sheds a calm, thorough light on such matters as Paul's meaning of law/grace, flesh/spirit, present age/age to come.

Title: Paul: An Outline of His Theology By: Herman Ridderbos Format: Paperback Vendor: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. Publication Date: 1998 Dimensions: 9 1/4 X 6 inches X 1 1/4 (inches). Weight: 1 pound 14 ounces ISBN: 0802844693 ISBN-13: 9780802844699 UPC: 9780802844699 Stock No: WW2844693.

Home Browse Books Book details, Paul: An Outline of His Theology. By Herman Ridderbos, John Richard De Witt. Paul: An Outline of His Theology. Words cannot adequately express my gratitude and appreciation to Dr. de Witt for his skill, theological acumen, and devoted service demonstrated in this translation.

Ridderbos continues with an outline of continuing development of schools of thought such as Bultmann, which labels the starting point .

Ridderbos continues with an outline of continuing development of schools of thought such as Bultmann, which labels the starting point of Pauline preaching as the certainty of having been placed in eschatalogical situation with the appearance of Jesus (p. 32). Digest: Ridderbos - Paul, An Outline of His Theology ! Patterson 5 This would seem paradoxical but rather it highlights the contrast between the dispos- able flesh and the intangible spirit. The full realization doesn’t happen until Digest: Ridderbos - Paul, An Outline of His Theology ! Patterson 6 the l narrative reaches its peak in the parousia.

A comprehensive survey of Pauline theology and scholarship, moving from textual exegesis to an overall interpretation of Paul's theology stressing its eschatological vision and import
Comments: (7)
Perius
A tour de force but difficult to follow. It is a translation; I don't know if the original is smoother. It reads like the lecture notes of a genius. I'm sure that Ridderbos would have been able to take any page and expound on it at length and to great effect. However, to the student who is trying to understand the material the first time, it's hard to discern the meaning. It's as though he assumes you are already familiar with the scholarly corpus.

The concept is fascinating. Ridderbos presents what is essentially a systematic theology using Pauline references alone. Generally, a systematic theology treats the entire Bible topically but here Ridderbos uses only Pauline epistles. He addresses these major topics:
1. Main lines in the history of Pauline interpretation.
2. Fundamental structures (e.g., "fullness of time," "the old and the new man," "the last Adam," etc.)
3. The life in sin (somewhat corresponding to the Anthropology section of most systematic theology books)
4. The revelation of the righteousness of God (including justification by faith)
5. Reconciliation (including atonement)
6. The new life
7. The new obedience (including three uses of the Law, marriage, and subjection to civil authority)
8. The church as the people of God
9. The church as the body of Christ
10. Baptism and the Lord's Supper
11. The upbuilding of the church (including offices, worship, and gifts)
12. The Future of the Lord (generally corresponding to eschatology in most treatments of systematic theology)

Ridderbos is solidly Reformed. His presentation is very scholarly. It is worthwhile as a reference. 562 pages.
Adaly
In Paul: An Outline of His Theology Ridderbos is concerned with gaining insights in to the fundamental structures of Paul’s preaching and doctrine. Beginning with the Reformation he shows the doctrine of justification by faith as being primary to interpreting Paul, even when , as in Calvin’s case, it was not the center. The author moves through history showing the different interpretations that have come to light. Highlighting F.C. Baur’s antithetical motif of the Spirit and the flesh being in opposition. Moving to the liberal interpretation where man must gain a rational victory over the sensual flesh. Then in the history of religions approach, he illuminates how scholars turned away from philosophy and towards syncretistic religious views of the Hellenistic period as the basis of understanding Paul. In the eschatological interpretation he writes of Schweitzer’s work of seeing Paul’s doctrine as resting on Jesus’ preaching of the kingdom. In more recent times, Bultmann has written that Paul’s theology is not about the redeemer who dies and come to life, but a cosmic drama of which the mythology of gnosis speaks. Ridderbos holds that the content of Paul’s preaching is of the eschatological time of salvation inaugurated with Christ’s death and resurrection. By the resurrection, Jesus as the first born from the dead and the second Adam will raise a new and justified humanity.

The attention to historical detail by which our author begins the book makes for a helpful introduction and context for what lies ahead. There is not only a summary of the key lines of interpretation, but the philosophical influences that undergird these positions. For example, in discussing Baur’s view of the Spirit and flesh in antithesis, Ridderbos provides insights into Baur’s conception of the Spirit, stating, “Baur’s conception is entirely governed by a Hegelian view of the history and the idea of the Spirit” (R. 17). Without this sort of commentary it is hard to know what an author means, as words are often used in ways different than how an evangelical reader would understand them. Next, in pouring over the fundamental structures of Paul’s theology it was plain that these structures were anchored in biblical theology, as the abundance of scriptural references attest. In some paragraphs nearly every point is either a biblical quote or marked with a parenthetic reference. For example, in discussing Paul’s theology on Christ as the firstborn of every creature (R. 78), he quotes nearly one third of a page of text from 1 Corinthians 8, Ephesians 1 and Colossians 1 and proceeds draw out his theology from there. This makes his points much more compelling as you don’t feel like you have to buy into a particular tradition to follow along. Another excellent point is the detail in which he interacts with the biblical text. He is not merely offering proof texts upon which to draw his own conclusions, rather he interacts with other writers on these texts, especially one’s with whom he does not agree. In this sense, sections where he is developing his position often have the feel of reading a good exegetical commentary, as when he interacts with Cullman who finds a human pre-existence of Christ in Philippians (R. 76). Ridderbos proceeds to interact with this position for one paragraph and then offers a solution to what he finds as Cullmann’s untenable position. This degree of thoroughness without going down rabbit trails or venturing on to endless hairsplitting and qualifications helps to tie down theological loose ends that might otherwise develop.

For all the book’s usefulness in combining history, exegetical thoroughness and logical structure, there was a sense in which reading it was like driving a high performance sports-car which, while having great performance, is tiring to drive for more than short bursts down the track. One of the main issues that leads me to this conclusion is the shear length of some of the writer’s sentences (I counted some that were over 70 words in length). I understand this is a translation and that some things are difficult to distill down to 10 or 15 words, yet there are good reasons for doing so. Whatever is gained in fidelity by stretching the sentence to such lengths is lost in other places, namely the reader’s ability to hold onto the author’s point from beginning to end. At times, reading this reminded me of hours spent reading the works of Augustine—insightful, but highly taxing. While more an annoyance than anything else, the regular inclusion of German, Latin and transliterated Greek in the (otherwise) English text, made for unnecessarily difficult reading. I understand the inclusion of Greek in a book written for seminary students, pastors and researchers, but the Latin and German without parenthetic translations or footnotes? It may prove an only minor issue, but sometimes even knowing what the title of someone’s work is, helps in understanding what follows. This seemed like a small issue that could have at least been handled in footnotes. The last critique I have is that application was sorely missed in this reading. It’s not that the work itself wasn’t applicable, but the writer didn’t set any application forth plainly. Surely for all the brilliant insights into the theology of Paul, he could have brought our minds to a greater grasp of how these truths apply in the church and seminary today. I’m reading this book, presumably to understand Paul’s theology, but I would like to have learned from the author how the application springs from this theology. I’m certain this question could have been answered with great insight.

I would recommend this book to a seminary student for research. This book goes into detail, handling the minutia of Paul’s theology in a manner consistent with what a researcher might hope to discover. I view this as a resource for specific topics. If you are studying Christ as “First born”, begin reading on page 78. If you are studying Christ as the “Image of God”, start on page 68. There is much to be gleaned in Ridderbos’ examination of these topics. I do not see the researcher necessarily needing to commit to reading the entire book in order to be assisted by it. I would also recommend this to anyone preparing to spend time preaching through Paul—there’s no need to begin a systematic expository series apart from a thorough knowledge of how Paul’s theology is understood (and how it’s been understood by others). In such a case this would probably prove better for preparation in laying a solid foundation, rather than something to consult while working on a sermon outline. I would not recommend this book to a Sunday school class or someone who is, in their personal devotion time, trying to make sense of something Paul discusses in one of his letters—I would recommend a commentary in that case. Yet for the researcher or exegete who has the time to delve into some of the nuances of Paul, this would be helpful.
Olma
Comprehensive
Jack
A+
Maridor
A must read for any serious student of Pauline theology.
Jode
Great insights
Aurizar
Great resource. Wish I had time to read it through but I tend to use it to understand Paul's broader theology when I need it. Great book.
its ok not great. but ok