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by Leslie J. Hoppe O.F.M.

eBook Priests, Prophets and Sages: Catholic Perspectives on the Old Testament download ISBN: 0867166975
Author: Leslie J. Hoppe O.F.M.
Publisher: St. Anthony Messenger Press (February 27, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 129
ePub: 1925 kb
Fb2: 1844 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

is professor of Old Testament studies at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. in religion from Northwestern University and has served on the faculties of Aquinas Institute of Theology and Mundelein Seminary.

is professor of Old Testament studies at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago. His works include Holy City: Jerusalem in the Theology of the Old Testament (The Liturgical Press) and There Shall Be No Poor Among You: Poverty in the Bible (Abingdon Press). In addition to teaching and writing, he has participated in several archeological projects in Israel.

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Leslie J. Hoppe OFM (born 22 September 1944) is a Roman Catholic priest and Franciscan Old Testament scholar with a focus on Deuteronomy and Deuteronomic literature and is an expert in biblical studies.

born 22 September 1944) is a Roman catholic priest and Franciscan Old Testament scholar with a focus on Deuteronomy and Deuteronomic literature and is an expert in biblical studies. He is Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old Testament Studies at Catholic Theological Union in Chicago and the general or of the refereed theological journal Catholic Biblical Quarterly. The Book of Isaiah: The Fifth Gospel (2016). Caesarea Maritima (Oxford 2013). Priests, Prophets, and Sages: Catholic Perspectives on the Old Testament (2006). New Light from Old Stories: Hebrew Scriptures for Today’s World (2005).

Catholics ought to read, study and pray with books . Prophets and Sages : Catholic Perspectives on the Old Testament.

book by Leslie J. Hoppe. Priests, Prophets and Sages : Catholic Perspectives on the Old Testament. Hoppe OFM (born 22 September 1944) is a Roman Catholic priest and Franciscan Old Testament scholar with a focus on. . He is Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old Testament Studies at Catholic Theologic. There shall be no poor among you: Poverty in the Bible (Abingdon Press 2004). A Retreat with Matthew: Going Beyond the Law (2000). Hoppe, OFM. Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old . Priests, Prophets and Sages: Catholic Perspectives on the Old Testament. Carroll Stuhlmueller Distinguished Professor of Old Testament Studies. MA Aquinas Institute of Theology. PhD Northwestern University. Fr. Hoppe has been a member of the CTU faculty since 1981. Cincinnati: St. Anthony Messenger Press 2006. New Light from Old Stories: Hebrew Scriptures for Today’s World.

The Old Testament also mentions false prophets. These were liars who claimed to speak for God but were intent upon deceiving the people or serving their own interests

The Old Testament also mentions false prophets. These were liars who claimed to speak for God but were intent upon deceiving the people or serving their own interests. The test of a prophet was 100 percent accuracy in what he said (Deuteronomy 18:22). If a prophet’s predictions did not come true, then he could not have been speaking for God, since God never lies (Numbers 23:19). The role of Old Testament prophet reached its consummation in the person of John the Baptist, who was predicted in Malachi 4:5 (cf. Hoppe, OFM, is an adjunct professor at Catholic Theological Union after . Hoppe, OFM, is an adjunct professor at Catholic Theological Union after serving on its faculty for twenty-four years, and serves as the provincial minister of the Assumption Province Franciscans. He has written several books on biblical studies and archaeology, including The Holy City: Jerusalem in the Theology of the Old Testament (Liturgical Press, 2000).

"Catholics ought to read, study and pray with [the Old Testament] books because their lives too are bound up with the very God who spoke through ancient Israel's priests, prophets and sages—the God who spoke finally and definitively through Jesus Christ."—from the Introduction What should we call the Old Testament and what books does it include? What does it say about God? Are the Israelites really the "chosen people"? How does God speak? Did everything in the Old Testament really happen? Was Jonah really swallowed by a great fish? What about all the violence? How can the God in the Old Testament and the one Jesus preached about seem so different? How can we find meaning in these books? If you've ever felt daunted by the idea of reading the Old Testament Scriptures, this book can ease your mind. Aimed to maintain the enthusiasm for Scripture inspired by the Second Vatican Council, Priests Prophets and Sages addresses many commonly asked questions about the Old Testament. Each chapter includes questions for reflection and further reading, making this work a great resource for Bible study with your parish, family or by yourself. Let Leslie Hoppe help you bridge the gap between the culture of the ancient Israelites and ours today, Old Testament and New. Challenge yourself to be supported, encouraged and called to greater commitment and obedience by the oldest writings connected to our faith.
Comments: (4)
INwhite
Hoppe is/was a professor at the Catholic Theological Union of Chicago which has a reputation in some circles as being a very liberal institution and those views are reflected in this book. The opinions Hoppe expresses are in line with the historical-critical method of biblical interpretation. This method has been overly emphasized in the last 150 yrs or so and was, in fact, criticized by Pope Benedict XVI in his book "Jesus of Nazareth." This over-emphasis has disrupted some people's Christian faith and caused them to doubt its authenticity. In Hoppe's book he continues along this line and either explicitly or implicitly criticizes the male-only clergy, divine revelation, the inerrancy of scripture - in opposition to the writings of the popes and councils, and miracles! The story of a miracle, he writes, "is not so much a story of what happened as much as it is an affirmation of faith and gratitude - which call for a response of loving obedience." One could ask, if the Bible is not the inerrant word of God, why should anyone believe anything in it? Thankfully, the Magisterium of the Church tells us how to understand and what to believe and not the writings of liberal theologians. Hoppe makes me wonder if he used Bart Erhman's and John Dominic Crossan's writings as the basis for this book. Or is Hoppe sympathetic to the so called Jesus Seminar which holds some blasphemous opinions? I do not recommend this book unless one wants to understand the position of those opposing a traditional understanding of scripture. This book is NOT a "Catholic" understanding of holy scripture.
Bedy
There is nothing bad about this book, it is not a bad book. Similarly it is not a great book or one that I would say is a must read. Some good facts with a bit odd feminist thread appearing here and there (though the author is male).
Sarin
Very good!
Beanisend
The author is a former editor of Bible Today, a periodical which brings scriptural research to an everyday audience. He has been on the faculty of the Catholic Theological Union for a quarter of a century.

This book's popularzing approach to the Old Testament plows no new ground, but is competent and does state well a number of interesting insights. For instance, the first chapter ("What Name Do We Give These Books?") begins: "Christianity is the only religion that accepts texts from another religious tradition as normative for its faith and life." (p. 7) The chapter goes on to give the pluses and minuses of Old Testament, Hebrew Testament, First (or Prime) Testament, and Shared Testament as appropriate designations. (He ultimately settles on "Old Testament" for use in this book.)

His take on what passes for history in the OT is perceptive and well stated. In speaking of the Hebrew conquest and settlement of Canaan, Hoppe notes that what the Bible gives "is more in the nature of a homiletic reflection on Israel's experience in its land from the time of the settlement to the time of exile." (p. 107) "To treat these books as if they were historical documents is to misread them" since these are "theological reflections." (p. 108)

There are "Questions for Reflection at the end of each chapter; while I found these somewhat superficial, they could be discussion starters for a parish class of newbies. The "For Further Reading" suggestions at the end of each chapter would benefit from brief descriptive annotations.