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by Jacqueline E. Lapsley,M. Daniel Carroll R.

eBook Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture download ISBN: 0664229360
Author: Jacqueline E. Lapsley,M. Daniel Carroll R.
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press (February 16, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1328 kb
Fb2: 1560 kb
Rating: 4.6
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

Daniel Carroll R. is Distinguished Professor of Old Testament at Denver Seminary in Littleton, Colorado. He is the author of several books, including Character Ethics and the Old Testament, published by WJK.

Daniel Carroll R. The collected essays were written by and for members of the SBL/AAR group on Character Ethics. In the introduction, Brueggemann defines character ethics as a practice of being (not doing) that is derived from and referred back to the character of God. who invites challenge and engagement, and who authorizes and empowers covenant partners to bold and courageous freedom (ix).

Start by marking Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral .

Start by marking Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Throughout the Old Testament, the stories, laws, and songs not only teach a way of life that requires individuals to be moral, but they demonstrate how. In biblical studies, character ethics has been one of the fastest-growing areas of interest. This book presents the most up-to-date academic work in Old Testament character ethics, covering topics throughout the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings, in addition to the use of the Bible in the modern world.

Daniel Carroll . Jacqueline E. Lapsley. This book presents the most up-to-date academic work in Old Testament character ethics, covering topics throughout the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings, in addition to the use of the Bible in the modern world

Daniel Carroll . In addition to Carroll and Lapsley, contributors are Denise M. Ackermann, Cheryl B. Anderson, Samuel E. Balentine, William P. Brown, Walter Brueggemann, Thomas B. Dozeman, Bob Ekblad, Jose Rafael Escobar . Theodore Hiebert, Kathleen O'Connor, Dennis T. Olson, J. David Pleins, Luis R. Rivera Rodriguez, J. J. M. Roberts, and Daniel L. Smith-Christopher. Lapsley is Associate Professor of Old Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey. She is the author ofWhispering the Word: Hearing Women's Stories in the Old Testament. and Can These Bones Live? The Problem of the Moral Self in the Book of Ezekiel.

In one of the most powerful and provocative sentences in either book, Lapsley writes, Making sense of their experience is specifically disallowed (96).

Daniel Carroll and Jacqueline E. Lapsley, eds. Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture. Louisville: Westminster/ John Knox, 2007. Robert L. Brawley, ed. Character Ethics and the New Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture. Louisville: Westminster/John Knox, 2007. In one of the most powerful and provocative sentences in either book, Lapsley writes, Making sense of their experience is specifically disallowed (96). The very idea that moral formation may include a proscription on making sense of a defining experience seems outrageous. Perhaps only those who have genuinely suffered could comprehend the idea.

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Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. Character Ethics and the Old Testament: Moral Dimensions of Scripture

Aristotelian virtue ethics invests emotions and feelings with much moral significance. However, the moral and other conflicts that inevitably beset human life often give rise to states of emotional division and ambivalence with problematic implications for any understanding of virtue as complete psychic unity of character and conduct  . August 2008 · Biblical Interpretation A Journal of Contemporary Approaches.

Character and Scripture (Eerdmans, 2002). Other works are on the horizon, such as M. Daniel Carroll R. and Jacqueline Lapsley (ed., Character Ethics and Biblical Interpretation: Appropriating the Old Testament for Moral Life (Westminster John Knox, 2006). Each of these deals with the multiple complex issues related to OT ethics in a sophisticated fashion, often utilizing other disciplines to illumine (or sometimes to question) the biblical text and probe it for insights for life. Old Testament Ethics for the People of God enhances An Eye for an Eye in several ways.

Carroll, M. Daniel; Lapsley, Jacqueline . Brueggemann, Walter. Westminster John Knox Press, 2007.

Throughout the Old Testament, the stories, laws, and songs not only teach a way of life that requires individuals to be moral, but they demonstrate how. In biblical studies, character ethics has been one of the fastest-growing areas of interest. Whereas ethics usually studies rules of behavior, character ethics focuses on how people are formed to be moral agents in the world. This book presents the most up-to-date academic work in Old Testament character ethics, covering topics throughout the Torah, the Prophets, and the Writings, in addition to the use of the Bible in the modern world.

In addition to Carroll and Lapsley, contributors are Denise M. Ackermann, Cheryl B. Anderson, Samuel E. Balentine, William P. Brown, Walter Brueggemann, Thomas B. Dozeman, Bob Ekblad, Jose Rafael Escobar R., Theodore Hiebert, Kathleen O'Connor, Dennis T. Olson, J. David Pleins, Luis R. Rivera Rodriguez, J. J. M. Roberts, and Daniel L. Smith-Christopher.

Comments: (2)
Quphagie
The collected essays were written by and for members of the SBL/AAR group on Character Ethics. In the introduction, Brueggemann defines character ethics as a “practice of being (not doing) that is derived from and referred back to the character of God . . . who invites challenge and engagement, and who authorizes and empowers covenant partners to bold and courageous freedom” (ix). Bruggemann distinguishes between this “dynamic interactionism” and the conventional focus on obedience to static commands. Character Ethics involves the intentional formation of community identity (xvii). Contributors to this volume share a desire to aid the church in forming such an identity, but they approach it from a variety of perspectives and social locations. While the first twelve essays start with biblical studies and move toward the modern context, the final four work in the reverse direction.

Theodore Hiebert, “Beyond Heilsgeschichte” (3–10)
William P. Brown, “The Moral Cosmologies of Creation” (11–26)
Thomas B. Dozeman, “Creation and Environment in the character Development of Moses” (27–36)
Cheryl B. Anderson, “Biblical Laws: Challenging the Principles of Old Testament Ethics” (37–50)
Dennis T. Olson, “Between Humility and Authority: The Interplay of the Judge-Prophet Laws (Deuteronomy 16:18–17:13) and the Judge-Prophet Narratives of Moses” (51–62)
Samuel E. Balentine, “Inside the ‘Sanctuary of Silence’: The Moral-Ethical Demands of Suffering” (63–80)
Kathleen M. O’Connor, “The Book of Jeremiah: Reconstructing Community after Disaster” (81–92)
Jacqueline E. Lapsley, “A Feeling for God: Emotions and Moral Formation in Ezekiel 24:15–27” (93–102)
M. Daniel Carroll R., “’He Has Told You What Is Good’: Moral Formation in Micah” (103-18)
J. J. M. Roberts, “The End of War in the Zion Tradition: The Imperialistic Background of an Old Testament Vision of Worldwide Peace” (119–28)
Daniel L. Smith-Christopher, “The Quiet Words of the Wise: Biblical Developments toward Nonviolence as a Diaspora Ethic” (129–52)
J. David Pleins, “Wine, Women, and Song (of Songs): Gender Politics and Identity Construction in Postexilic Israel” (153–68)
Luis R. Rivera-Rodriquez, “Toward a Diaspora Hermeneutics (Hispanic North America)” (169–90)
Denise M. Ackermann, “Tamar’s Cry: Rereading an Ancient Text in the Midst of an HIV/AIDS Pandemic (South Africa)” (191–220)
Bob Ekblad, “Resisting Rejection by the ‘Elect’ in Genesis 25–27 (Migrant Workers and Prisoners, Northwest USA)” (221–36)
J. Rafael Escobar R., “Toward a Culture of Peace and Nonviolence in Postwar Guatemala” (237–47)

Taken as a whole, these essays exhibit a remarkable consistency of penetrating insight. The editors are to be commended for compiling such a valuable collection. Each author stimulated my thinking in profound ways by helping me look at Scripture from new angles. Some essays offered insight culled from study of the ancient Near East or from reading the Bible through a particular set of lenses (diaspora, exile, gender, creation, or wisdom). Others simply read the Bible itself more closely and asked probing questions at key junctures. Still others viewed the Bible through the eyes of the oppressed and modeled fruitful modes of discovery. I think it is fair to say that these authors have handled Scripture responsibly, even while reading from self-consciously identified communities. The true achievement of their work is that they have not only read the Bible in life-giving ways for their own communities (or communities of service), but have managed to bring readers along sympathetically, empowering us to see things through the eyes of the “other.”

In the end I doubt I will ever be able to look at the text in quite the same way. None of these authors were satisfied with easy answers and they sought to overcome common misunderstandings about Scripture. While I did not find myself in full agreement with every author, each one pushed me to think more deeply. A number of these essays made it on my short list: O’Connor, Lapsley, Roberts, Smith-Christopher, and especially Ackermann and Eckblad. I expect to refer to them many times in years to come as I guide students through the Scriptures and help them consider its potential for ethical reflection.
Bulace
A great collection of scholarly essays. I found many of the essays enlightening to my overall understanding of various circumstances in the Old Testament​.