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by Chris Keith

eBook Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity download ISBN: 0567377237
Author: Chris Keith
Publisher: T&T Clark; 1 edition (August 30, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1771 kb
Fb2: 1765 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Christian Books
Subcategory: Bible Study and Reference

Chris Keith and Anthony Le Donne have put together a forceful collection of essays in Jesus, Criteria, and the . The overall mood of the book is that the criteria that have been and continued to be used by Jesus scholars need to be "jettisoned

Chris Keith and Anthony Le Donne have put together a forceful collection of essays in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. Honestly, this book has the potential to completely reshape the way historical Jesus studies are executed. The historiographical foundation of the Third Quest has been the criteria of authenticity. The overall mood of the book is that the criteria that have been and continued to be used by Jesus scholars need to be "jettisoned. The authors (especially Le Donne) seem to be calling for Jesus scholars to punt to more of a post modern view of history. The attempt to use such criteria are a form of what Le Donne calls "positivist" historiography.

Criteria of authenticity, whose roots go back to before the pioneering work . Chris Keith, Anthony Le Donne.

More recently, however, scholars from different methodological frameworks have expressed discontent with this approach to the historical Jesus. This book has the potential to guide Jesus studies beyond the Third Quest and demand to be consulted by any scholar who discards, adopts, or adapts historical criteria.

Start by marking Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity as Want to Read .

Start by marking Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The book's larger ramifications as a thorough end to the Third Quest will provide a pressure valve for thousands of scholars who view historical Jesus studies as outmoded and misguided.

Several bloggers have mentioned the upcoming conference and accompanying book, with the title Jesus, Criteria . It might seem that the title could more naturally have been "Jesus and the Demise of Criteria of Authenticity.

Several bloggers have mentioned the upcoming conference and accompanying book, with the title Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. But I suspect that the wording is intentional - what has.

Volume 38 - Issue 1. Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. by Chris Keith and Anthony Le Donne, eds. Abstract. New York: T&T Clark, 2012. This book is an important starting point for progressing in what some feel is a stalled discipline. Eric Roseberry City of God Church Lafayette, Indiana, USA.

3 Demise of authenticity and call for memory studies. Christ myth theorists . 2 Overview of main mythicist arguments.

The Embarrassing Truth about Jesus: The Criterion of Embarrassment and the Failure of Historical Authenticity. Pages 132-51 in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. London: T&T Clark, 2012

The Embarrassing Truth about Jesus: The Criterion of Embarrassment and the Failure of Historical Authenticity. London: T&T Clark, 2012. Keith, Chris, and Anthony Le Donne, eds. Jesus’ Emotions in the Fourth Gospel.

Chris Keith shows us that even though authenticity criteria actually grew out of form-criticism, many scholars who have used these criteria simultaneously reject the methodological foundation from which they emerged. In other words, many have used these criteria for a purpose they were never meant to serve and even reject the original rationales for these criteria.

Pages 25–70 in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. The Fall of the Quest for an Authentic Jesus: Concluding Remarks

Pages 25–70 in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. The Fall of the Quest for an Authentic Jesus: Concluding Remarks. Pages 200–205 in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. Jesus Outside and Inside the Gospels. Pages 1–31 in Jesus among Friends and Enemies: A Historical and Literary Introduction to Jesus in the Gospels.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Chris Keith books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Criteria of authenticity, whose roots go back to before the pioneering work of Albert Schweitzer, have become a unifying feature of the so-called Third Quest for the Historical Jesus, finding a prominent and common place in the research of otherwise differing scholars. More recently, however, scholars from different methodological frameworks have expressed discontent with this approach to the historical Jesus. In the past five years, these expressions of discontent have reached a fever pitch.

The internationally renowned authors of this book examine the nature of this new debate and present the findings in a cohesive way aimed directly at making the coalface of Historical Jesus research accessible to undergraduates and seminary students. The book's larger ramifications as a thorough end to the Third Quest will provide a pressure valve for thousands of scholars who view historical Jesus studies as outmoded and misguided. This book has the potential to guide Jesus studies beyond the Third Quest and demand to be consulted by any scholar who discards, adopts, or adapts historical criteria.

Comments: (4)
Garr
The realistic scholarship on the various historical criteria and their difficulties is honestly evaluated here with no punches pulled, and credit given where it is deserved. An honest and honestly excellent intriguing and well worth reading book. I loved the various scholars contributing to it so we can get a variety and confluence of different intellectual and spiritual approaches. CONGRATS on an excellent text.
Monn
Chris Keith and Anthony Le Donne have put together a forceful collection of essays in Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity. Honestly, this book has the potential to completely reshape the way historical Jesus studies are executed. The historiographical foundation of the Third Quest has been the criteria of authenticity. If one is to engage the sources seriously, then the criteria, it is said, are the scholarly tools for the job. Yet, as Keith and company show, the criteria cannot deliver what they promise.

The volume begins with an introduction by Le Donne articulating the intentions of the assembled scholars. While they are not monolithic in their evaluation of the criteria, they are unified in a general unrest and dissatisfaction with the way the criteria have been used. Thus, the volume is primarily unified in deconstruction while containing considerable variance in prescription for the future of historical Jesus studies. For example, some contributors think the criteria remain a valuable though limited tool, while others call for wholesale abandon of their use. Yet the thesis remains the same, the traditional use of the criteria is untenable.

The next two chapters are by Chris Keith and Jens Schröter. Keith demonstrates the dependence of the criteria upon form-criticism, arguing persuasively that if form-criticism is dead, then so are the criteria. Schröter in turn considers the historiographical methodology that underlies the criteria. As perhaps one the most sophisticated historiographers currently engaged in the Quest, Schröter's voice is especially significant. He demonstrates the bankruptcy of the form-critical approach as a historical methodology and argues in favor of an approach that takes the Gospels seriously as narratives - recognizing the Gospels as a whole as our sources for reconstruction.

The next part of the volume considers the five most prominent of the criteria, in my view, successfully exposing their weaknesses as tools of authentication. Loren Stuckenbruck begins by completely dismantling the criterion of Semitic influence. Anyone wishing to employ Semitisms for authentication will have first have to go through Stuckenbruck - a task I doubt can be accomplished. The second criteria on the chopping block is the criterion of coherence. Anthony Le Donne demonstrates convincingly that coherence is nowhere near an objective tool. The history of its use reveals how intertwined it has been with the subjective pre-understanding of the scholar. Likewise, it leaves no room for inconsistency in historical figures - something that basic experience should guard us against.

Dagmar Winter turns her scope to the criterion of dissimilarity. This is without a doubt the most suspect of the criteria. Nearly every article contributes throws at least a few jabs at dissimilarity, even when that is not their subject. Winter previously coauthored a volume with Gerd Theissen, The Quest for the Plausible Jesus, which completely obliterates dissimilarities worth (see my review). Thus, she is well qualified as the contributor for this article. She successfully summarizes her previous argument and offers a way forward that flips dissimilarity on its head.

Rafael Rodriguez then offers a critique against the criterion of embarrassment. He shows how the criterion falls short of objectivity because it relies on the historian's own portrait of early Christianity (this is rather similar to Winter's critique of dissimilarity). The events that historian's consider embarrassing are only embarrassing when placed in a particular narrative. For example, Jesus' baptism is only embarrassing if it is assumed that he is sinless. However, we can't be confident that all early Christians thought that. In fact, it may actually have bolstered Jesus' authority because it associated him with a famous prophet. Thus, the criterion of embarrassment is unable to deliver of the objectivity that it promises.

Ending the onslaught of the individual criteria is Mark Goodacre. He evaluates the worth of the criterion of multiple of attestation. Goodacre concedes the basic historiographical point that more sources attesting is better than less. However, he is not confident that we are able to identify when we have multiple sources. This is where his critique of Q is relevant, as he argues that Q and Mark may not represented two independent sources. Really, we are not confident enough to discern whether any of our sources can truly be considered independent of one another. If that is the case, the the criterion is of no use.

The volume ends with two chapter by Scot McKnight and Dale Allison and a short conclusion by Keith. McKnight argues that the "Authentic Jesus" (the Jesus of the criteria) is of no use for the Church, because the Church already has its portrait of Jesus in the creeds and the Gospels. However, he does concede a limited apologetic worth contained in the Quest (though, not necessarily the criteria). Allison then provides his own musings on the use of the criteria. He remains very skeptical of their worth showing how he has grown increasingly wary of their use, for much of the same reasons as contributors argued. Keith then wraps it up in a hopeful tone, suggesting that the Quest is not bankrupt - we can still do real history - yet the game has certainly changed. The rules by which we used to work are no longer tenable and a new path must be charted. A path that admittedly has yet to be identified, however, work is being done and social memory may provide the missing key.

My Thoughts

As I said in introduction, this book has the potential, if widely read, to completely redefine the task of historical Jesus research. Each of the contributors is convincing, leaving the overall impression that things need to change. If historical Jesus research is to continue, than the criteria, at the most optimistic evaluation, need to be completely reworked.

It is a bit daunting because the old foundation is stripped away. A lot of questions are left unanswered. The way forward is unclear. But that is the cost of good history - a willingness to rethink from the ground up. This was much a needed volume. While it was not groundbreaking in its arguments (many of these arguments have been made previously), it was groundbreaking in its unified presentation.

A dart has been lodged in the heart of traditional Jesus scholarship. A new way of doing history needs to be found.

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Ynneig
As someone who has a great interest in the Historical Jesus studies, I was excited to get a review copy of the book Jesus, Criteria, and the Demise of Authenticity, by Chris Keith and Anthony Le Donne. The premise of the book is whether what historical Jesus scholars utilize to establish as to what Jesus really said isauthentic. The criteria that are analyzed in this book have been mentioned in John P.Meier's A Marginal Jew.

Here are the criteria that are discussed in this book:

1.Criteria of Multiple Attestation

3.The Criteria of Coherence

4. The Criteria of Dissimilarity

5. The Criteria of "Semitic (Aramaic) Influence on the Greek"

My thoughts on the book:

The overall mood of the book is that the criteria that have been and continued to be used by Jesus scholars need to be "jettisoned." The authors (especially Le Donne) seem to be calling for Jesus scholars to punt to more of a post modern view of history. The attempt to use such criteria are a form of what Le Donne calls "positivist" historiography. Hence, the attempt to "verify" and "objectify" a historical Jesus is a wasted process. In other words, it is time to move on. There is no finding any kind of objective criteria that would ever help us to get to the Historical Jesus.

Each chapter attempts to show the shortcomings of each of these criteria. It is because of this I find the authors to overstate their case. If I was to see this book rewritten, I would like to see the authors say the criteria needs to be modified and not entirely jettisoned.Despite the book's shortcomings, there are some strengths. Overall, each article is well written and the footnotes leave the reader with plenty of extra reading material to pursue for further research. Each scholar is qualified to speak on these topics. The issues they bring up are very relevant to the topic of Jesus studies. I also found Mark Goodacre's chapter on Multiple Attestation chapter to be helpful. This is mostly because I have always found Q to be a questionable source to use for Historical Jesus scholars. I also agree with some of the criticisms about the dissimilarity criteria.

In my conversations with Michael Licona about the book, he has told me there will be a response to this book sometime later this year. After all, almost all the Historical Jesus books on my shelf have utilized some of the criteria. For me personally, I think the work on eyewitness testimony by Richard Bauckham and the ongoing work of social memory is promising. I advise reading Michael Bird's latest book The Gospel of the Lord.
xander
This is a highly recommended book for those who are interested in historical Jesus studies. The authors take issue with the "Criteria of Authenticity" the backbone of most of historical Jesus research done over the last several decades. The authors represent differing positions, some believe that the criteria should be completely abandoned, while others see some of the criteria as being useful but needing revision. This is not a fundamentalist hit job but a scholarly tome that should be taken seriously, even if one doesn't fully agree with the positions taken.