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eBook 11 Planets: A New View of the Solar System download

by David A. Aguilar

eBook 11 Planets: A New View of the Solar System download ISBN: 1426302363
Author: David A. Aguilar
Publisher: National Geographic Children's Books (March 11, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 48
ePub: 1277 kb
Fb2: 1361 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc azw lrf lrf
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Nature and How It Works

The book does an excellent job of giving the basic solar system layout in easily understood terms.

The book does an excellent job of giving the basic solar system layout in easily understood terms. And a little bit about the Oort Cloud, meteors, comets and planets around other suns. And our own Sun, of course.

In double pages, 11 PLANETS presents each planet with illuminating photographs, digital paintings, and many .

In double pages, 11 PLANETS presents each planet with illuminating photographs, digital paintings, and many visually impressive artworks and fast fact charts as well as paragraphs of texts that both informs and delights. We have never learnt so much so fast about our solar system and author/illustrator David A. Aguilar has brought the planets from the sky to our fingertips in the most fascinating way.

In 11 Planets, David Ag National Geographic proudly presents the essential reference book for what is now officially a. .David Aguilar’s 11 Planets is a simple yet compelling introduction to the solar system as it is now classified.

In 11 Planets, David Ag National Geographic proudly presents the essential reference book for what is now officially a NEW AGE in space. In August 2006, the International Astronomical Union redefined the word "planet" and relegated Pluto to the status of a dwarf planet, along with Ceres and Eris. Naturally, National Geographic is there to map out this new view of our solar system. In 11 Planets, David Aguilar, an expert who works on the leading edge of this astounding shift, explains and explores our new galactic knowledge.

In 11 Planets, David Aguilar, an expert who works on the leading edge of this astounding shift, explains and explores our .

In 11 Planets, David Aguilar, an expert who works on the leading edge of this astounding shift, explains and explores our new galactic knowledge.

In 11 Planets, David Aguilar, an expert who works on the leading edge of this astounding shift, explains .

National Geographic proudly presents the essential reference book for what is now officially a NEW AGE in space.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for 11 Planets: A New View of.

National Geographic David Aguilar. ISBN 10: 1426304579, ISBN 13: 9781426304576. View all copies of this book. Price: US$ 7. 7 Convert Currency. Shipping: Free Within . Destination, rates & speeds. Published by National Geographic Society, 2008. Condition: Good Soft cover. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . verified user30 Day Return Policy.

Rather than ignominiously booting Pluto out of the planetary fold, Aguilar, Director of.

Rather than ignominiously booting Pluto out of the planetary fold, Aguilar, Director of Science Information at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, shepherds it back into the flock along with its two dwarf planet buddies, Ceres and Eris, offering readers a readjusted and inclusive view of our Sun's orbiters.

David Aguilar s "11 Planets" is a simple yet compelling introduction to the solar system as it is now classified. This beautiful volume also includes informative spreads on: The Sun Earth s moon Mars moons, Phobos and Diemos Ceres, one of the new dwarf planets The Asteroid Belt Pluto and its moon, Charon Sedna and Eggland, two large Kuiper Belt objects Saturn's rings and moons Comets and the Oort Cloud Other new worlds now being discovered. David Aguilar s "11 Planets" is a simple yet compelling introduction to the solar system as it is now classified.

National Geographic proudly presents the essential reference book for what is now officially a NEW AGE in space. In August 2006, the International Astronomical Union redefined the word "planet" and relegated Pluto to the status of a dwarf planet, along with Ceres and Eris. Naturally, National Geographic is there to map out this new view of our solar system. In 11 Planets, David Aguilar, an expert who works on the leading edge of this astounding shift, explains and explores our new galactic knowledge. Using spectacular computer artwork, exclusive to National Geographic, and simple engaging text, this colorful book profiles all 11 planets in our newly categorized solar system: terrestrial Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars; gas giants Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune; and dwarf planets Pluto, Ceres, and Eris. The author of the hugely popular Planets, Stars, and Galaxies now leads young minds through into this exciting new view of space, giving readers a vivid "you are there" sensation through his photorealistic artwork. David Aguilar’s 11 Planets is a simple yet compelling introduction to the solar system as it is now classified. This beautiful volume also includes informative spreads on: The Sun Earth’s moon Mars’ moons, Phobos and Diemos Ceres, one of the new dwarf planets The Asteroid Belt Pluto and its moon, Charon Sedna and Eggland, two large Kuiper Belt objects Saturn's rings and moons Comets and the Oort Cloud Other new worlds now being discovered This engaging volume also includes fun activities for young readers. Aguilar’s text presents the latest discoveries in space to young imaginations in a compelling and scientifically accurate way, encouraging understanding of mankind’s new view of our solar system. This is the volume that every library needs; and the book that every child should have access to as the ultimate reference for the new age in space.
Comments: (7)
Manesenci
If a third-grader were to ask you how many planets there are in our solar system, how would you answer? Back before August of 2006, it would be pretty simple -- nine: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. Ceres, which is found between Mars and Jupiter, was once considered a planet, but in 1850 was reclassified as an asteroid.

Growing up in the 1970s and 80s, I looked forward with excitement to the possibility that they would, some day, discover a tenth planet, way out there in the icy wastes beyond Pluto. In 2005, they announced just that -- the discovery of the body now known as Eris, just a tad bigger than Pluto, but three times farther away from the Sun.

And then, after lots of arguing back and forth, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in August of 2006 decided to lump Ceres, Pluto and Eris into a special new category of their own, the "dwarf planet". So now, you'd tell that third-grader that there are eight planets -- unless you include the dwarfs.

Basically, the scientists are still arguing about exactly what they mean by a "dwarf planet". Meanwhile, author David A. Aguilar, along with his publisher, National Geographic, made his own decision -- as shown in the newly released book "11 Planets: A New View of the Solar System". I first learned about it when National Geographic announced that a girl named Maryn Smith, of Montana, came up with a nifty new mnemonic for learning the 11 planets: "My Very Exciting Magic Carpet Just Sailed Under Nine Palace Elephants". This appears at the very start of the new book.

Now, I'm a bit older than the target age group of ages 9 to 12, but enjoyed flipping through the pages. The book does an excellent job of giving the basic solar system layout in easily understood terms. First, there's the four terrestrial planets, then Ceres and the asteroid belt, then the four gas giants, and finally Pluto, Eris and the Kuiper Belt. And a little bit about the Oort Cloud, meteors, comets and planets around other suns. And our own Sun, of course.

Each section has a little discussion of the god, or goddess, the planet was named after (such as Ceres, the goddess of agriculture), along with nice drawings of the planet and its moons, if any. Included are some interesting facts, such as Jupiter's Giant Red Spot having existed for hundreds of years, or that Uranus is on its side, not more or less upright like the other planets. There are separate sections for Earth's moon, as well as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. In back is a handy glossary and a table showing how much children of various sizes would weigh on various planets -- at least, those with a solid surface.

To give your budding astronomer some idea of the relative sizes of the planets, there's a fun list of ingredients you can buy from the store (a grapefruit, an orange, peas, a cherry tomato, a grape, some sugar, baking soda and salt) and how you can lay them out -- if you don't mind walking 1000+ yards to get to where Eris would be on that scale.

The one thing that might prove controversial is the author's decision to actually number the dwarf planets in among the bigger ones. Thus, Ceres is the fifth planet, Pluto the tenth and Eris the eleventh. Aguilar skips the more technical aspects of the IAU's decision, such as the fact the dwarf planets "fail to clear their neighborhood". He prefers to simply classify the planets by their size: small, medium and large. Given the book's target audience, that's just as well. Personally, I like his approach.

As more dwarf planets are added to the list, as is very likely, it may become increasingly unwieldy. I doubt anyone but the most die-hard future astronomer would want to memorize fifteen or twenty planets, never mind several dozen. But eleven is a nice number, and will do for now.
Kea
Upon looking through the book for the first time, we found there was a big 2 inch long smear of thick blood on the bottom of page 19. So disturbing. Cut that portion off of the page. The book itself is good. Kids love it.
Gardall
I bought this book for my daughter a few months ago when she turned 5, and she loves it. It has beautiful illustrations and only one page with info per planet (and sometimes another page for the planet's moons), so it's easy to read. The language is simple enough for a little kid to understand. It also talks about comets, Oort clouds and other solar systems. I like it so much that I've bought a few more for birthday presents.
Kerdana
My daughter had questions about the planets, I bought her this book and she loves it. She has read it 4 times. I definitely got my money's worth from this purchase.
Faulkree
48 pages, Grade 3-8 - An exciting title for the astronomic-oriented, this book updates readers about our solar system from nine planets to eleven and the easy-to-follow reclassifications of them: Rocky/Terrestrial: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars; Gas planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Dwarf planets: Ceres(new), Pluto and Eris(new). In double pages, 11 PLANETS presents each planet with illuminating photographs, digital paintings, and many visually impressive artworks and fast fact charts as well as paragraphs of texts that both informs and delights. The memory trick to remember the new planets in order among many other humorous lines makes my kid laugh really hard. We have never learnt so much so fast about our solar system and author/illustrator David A. Aguilar has brought the planets from the sky to our fingertips in the most fascinating way.
Doulkree
Really? 11 planets? I'm still trying to wrap my head around the whole Pluto is a dwarf planet thing, then I find out there's two new dwarf planets called Ceres and Eris. Did you know that? I sure as heck didn't!

First of all, I enjoyed the format of this book. Aguilar gives you an introduction to the `new' solar system, tells how it is formed, discusses the Sun, then breaks down each planet. Planets such as Earth, Jupiter and Saturn have additional information that tends to include information on moons and meteorites. Quite frankly, I learned a lot from this book! That doesn't mean I'll remember it, but I will remember this book because of an additional feature that I just adored: it gives you the name of the Greek or Roman god whom the planet is named after (Sun = Apollo) with a bit of additional information on that deity. I love mythology, so this was a great hook to keep me interested. And although the information is necessary and presented in an easy-to-access manner, it still bored me. I don't think this is actually the fault of the author, more of a lack of serious interest on my part.

Teachers, this could be a great way to combine a lesson on mythology with how it still influences us today. Obviously it's also a great introduction to our Solar System.

Notes on the Cover:
A big 11 with the sun bursting from behind while the 11 planets are lined up. Kudos to you if you can spot all 11 (kids will love doing that, 3 are tiny!)
lolike
This is a beautiful book I keep on my coffee table. I'm very happy with it.
This is the WORST BOOKS EVER!!! It says that PEOPLE ARE MADE FROM STAR DUST!!!--- DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK! SO much weird stuff said in this book!! BEWARE!!!