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eBook The Fairy Godmother Academy #1: Birdie's Book download

by Andrea Burden,Jan Bozarth

eBook The Fairy Godmother Academy #1: Birdie's Book download ISBN: 0375951814
Author: Andrea Burden,Jan Bozarth
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers (August 25, 2009)
Language: English
ePub: 1176 kb
Fb2: 1442 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lrf rtf doc
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Nature and How It Works

Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time.

Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time.

Jan Bozarth, Andrea Burden (Illustrator). Join the Fairy Godmother Academy! Visit the Web site for games, activities, and networking with friends! ww.

Jan Bozarth; Andrea Burden. Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time, she learns that her grandmother is a fairy godmother-which means Birdie's a fairy godmother too! Trained by fairies in a magical land called Aventurine, human fairy godmothers have been hidden protectors of the world for centuries

Authors: Jan Bozarth, Andrea Burden.

Author Jan Bozarth has written an adventure story with a lot going for it. The characters are strong, lovable, and come with all the vunerabilities real girls have. Instead of creating a fluffy novel that concentrates on pretty fairies and magical river maidens, Bozarth imagined a fantasy world twith depth and complexity, much like the real world where our heroes Birdie and Kerka live. There is danger, wonderful twists and turns, disappointments, triumphs, and heroic fights. Authors: Jan Bozarth, Andrea Burden.

Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time, she learns that her grandmother is a fairy godmother-which means Birdie's a fairy godmother too! Trained by fairies in a magical land called Aventurine, human fairy godmothers have been hidden protectors of the world for centuries.

Fairy Godmother Academy, Austin, Texas.

Электронная книга "The Fairy Godmother Academy Birdie's Book", Jan Bozarth. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Fairy Godmother Academy Birdie's Book" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Publisher: Random House. Print ISBN: 9780375851810, 037585181X. Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time, she learns that her grandmother is a fairy godmother-which means Birdie's a fairy godmother too! Trained by fairies in a magical land called Aventurine, human fairy godmothers have been hidden protectors of the world for centuries. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to The Fairy Godmother Academy Birdie's Book.

The Fairy Godmother Academy Birdie’s Book by Jan Bozarth is great for girls who love fairies and magical worlds. Unfortunately, the story is confusing at times

The Fairy Godmother Academy Birdie’s Book by Jan Bozarth is great for girls who love fairies and magical worlds. Unfortunately, the story is confusing at times. Some of Birdie’s thoughts and dialogue are a little unrealistic and corny compared to other books written for the same YA audience. It’s not the best book out there, but if you’re a fairy lover then this may just float your boat.

Where do fairy godmothers come from? When Birdie goes to visit her grandmother for the first time, she learns that her grandmother is a fairy godmother—which means Birdie's a fairy godmother too! Trained by fairies in a magical land called Aventurine, human fairy godmothers have been hidden protectors of the world for centuries. Birdie' s family talisman, a singing stone, has been broken, and now only Birdie can use the stone to travel to Aventurine to repair it. When she gets there she meets Kerka, a warrior-like girl who has been sent to help her find the other half of the stone. Will Birdie and Kerka have the knowledge and strength to banish the shadow that has come over both the garden in Aventurine and Birdie's family? One thing's for sure—no one who travels to Aventurine will ever be the same again!For girls who are fans of Harry Potter and have outgrown the Disney Fairies series and the American Girl books, the Fairy Godmother Academy is the perfect series—fantasy books filled with magic and adventure but grounded by contemporary girls and issues.The series boasts an amazing Web site that allows girls to enter the world they visit in the books. There they can do activities both on- and offline, vote for things they'd like to see in the books, and connect with other Fairy Godmother Academy fans.Join the Fairy Godmother Academy!Visit the Web site for games, activities, and networking with friends!www.fairygodmotheracademy.comFrom the Trade Paperback edition.
Comments: (7)
Lcena
Loved this book. Very creative, and heartfelt ! Highly recommend for pre-teen reading !
Bliss
cute book, my daughter enjoyed it
Hono
great book for girls to read
Goldcrusher
Read the first few chapters before giving it to my almost 9 year old daughter and find the storyline very realistic, well-written from a young girls perspective, and overall just rather charming!
She's loving it and I can hardly get her to put it down!
Prince Persie
This book was the best thing I could ever own! I love all the make believe creatures! It is so good that I came home after school and read it every day ! I would recommend this to everyone who likes adventures, and likes to read
BOND
This book is difficult for me to rate here, as the quality of the story is so very uneven - making it a 3.0, at best. The story hooked me right away, creating both the most lovely fantasy and real book settings I've probably ever encountered. As a life-long lover of nature, beauty, and gardens (especially flower gardens), the biologic language of flowers and plants, along with the visual splendor of Mo's gardens and the dream fairy world (Aventurine), captured my imagination in ways few books have ever done. Just like Birdie, I couldn't help but be attracted to Mo and the notion of chains of "fairy godmothers", as well.

Then, the book's technical writing flaws began to become so blatant, they started interrupting my enjoyment of the story. Time and again, without any attempt at explanation, each of the book's protagonists would just somehow "know" something and act on that sudden eruption of "knowledge" without any explanation of where it all came from. Some readers might generously label those episodes as "intuitions" but intuition is based on previous experiences - experiences that were never hinted at nor explained in any form, nor was any logical clarification surrounding these mysterious flashes of "knowledge" ever provided either.

It left me, as the reader, feeling as though I was a third party secretly overhearing a story conversation going on between the author and a mysterious, yet fully informed, other party. In other words, I felt very much an outsider to the story, rather than an active participant within it. As such, I felt frustrated by the frequent gaps in disclosures regarding the rules and world-building structures of Aventurine.

There was no consistency regarding how knowledge was obtained or passed along, nor how/why there erupted extraordinary roller coasters of emotions, midway through the adventure which abruptly ended once Birdie returned to the "real world". Basic facts such as Birdie's unusual forced weekend study of Latin are never discussed or explained. This leaves the reader unclear whether it was related to a religious requirement, an academic agenda, or some other quirky need. Clearly, it is extraordinarily unusual for a child of her age to be able to both accurately identify a broad range of plants using conventional English names, let alone the Latin ones, on top of it. Yet, the reader is given almost no explanation for how/why Birdie already had such knowledge, especially as her mom was so opposed to everything connected to the world of Mo (which would suggest gardening/plants, as well).

Both Birdie and Kerka were amazingly incurious characters who repeatedly failed to ask significant questions either of themselves, each other, or of anyone else they came in contact with. With all of the unfamiliar settings, objects, and experiences they were going through, their IQ levels would have had to be subnormal for them to have gone through so much with so few questions being asked or answered. Most preteens would never pursue any serious task/quest with so few questions asked or answered.

At the same time, the author somehow wants the reader to believe that children genuinely assess their own statements for levels of "whininess". Having worked with hundreds of children of all ages, as both an RN and K-8 teacher, I have yet to meet a child who is concerned about their level of complaints, except when they fear that such statements will invoke brutal punishments via the adults in their lives. Having peeked at another book in this series, it appears it is the author, herself, who despises children who complain. Apparently, both questions and complaints go against her value system, which I don't agree with nor find healthy.

The whole meaning behind the "Shadow Tree" and the dead plants surrounding it were neither explored nor explained, making most of the painful events that occurred there meaningless to the reader. Why was Kerka kidnapped by the "Shadow Tree" and her hair lopped off by the fern? What did those stinging lights represent and why didn't the fairy queen equip the girls better to protect themselves from all those attacking creatures in the "Shadow Land"? Clearly, both Mo and the fairy queen knew much more than they ever bothered to share with Birdie. Why did they both opt to withhold so much valuable, insightful information about Aventurine?

None of these questions and dozens of similar ones were even briefly raised or explained anywhere in the book. Birdie didn't seem the least bit upset that both her grandmother and mother had been withholding huge quantities of important family knowledge/history from her. I know of very few real-world kids who would be so nonchalant about the range and depth of family deceptions and lies that Birdie had unwittingly been living amongst.

It would have been far more reasonable for Birdie to have expressed a whole range of emotions upon returning to the "real world", rather than swinging wildly through emotions in the "dream world". After all, she had been used as an innocent "pawn" in her mother's war against her grandmother, since birth. The author doesn't want readers to seriously look at the impact of that choice on Birdie, so she just breezes right over it all, as though it's irrelevant and minor - a genuine fantasy, on the author's behalf.

The ending of the book was the weakest part of the whole project. Suddenly, Birdie's mom is rushing home from London to see her mom who'd she'd despised and spent decades describing as a "crazy old bat" to anyone who asked???? I understand that this is a fantasy book but this story's resolution is so far beyond believable as to make a joke of genuine family discord and painful, intergenerational events. No severely broken relationships are healed either this rapidly nor as miraculously as this one appears to. It takes a lot of time to rebuild trust and closeness after such huge family tears. Apparently, despite the author's age, she still has yet to learn this fact of life.

The superficiality of the ending and the quick, easy resolution of Birdie's grief about being yanked away from her treasured home, school, and friends in Califa, feels deeply disrespectful of the emotions and needs of children, to me. It's clear, from my perspective, that the author wants to breezily resolve several major traumas of childhood by "blowing a little fairy dust" upon them. Clearly, she doesn't have much depth to herself and, thus, doesn't sense much depth to the internal world of children, either.

There is so much potential in this book's setting, characters, fantasy world, and nature themes that could, theoretically, encourage, enrich, and engage readers who are making major adaptations to some of the greatest challenges of life. Sadly, the author doesn't yet live up to the potential of the world she's created. Hopefully, in future books, she will display much greater depth and sensitivity in her use of Aventurine as a source of healing, not only of children and families, but of nature/the planet, as well.
Eigonn
Birdie is excited and scared. She is off to visit her grandmother, who she doesn't remember at all. Her mother and grandmother have been estranged for years. Birdie doesn't know why as her mother refuses to discuss it. But her father thinks Birdie should know her family so he has sent her to visit while her mom is traveling on business.

Birdie has one overriding interest, plants. She knows them all, their characteristics, how to grow them, their Latin names. Imagine her joy when she discovers her grandmother lives on a large piece of land with hundreds of varieties of plants, and a greenhouse. She makes her living selling various plants. Her land has large gardens, with mazes and some of the largest trees Birdie has ever seen. While exploring, she discovers the tree that is the heart of the land, but also discovers that it is dying.

This discovery leads her grandmother to tell her of her family history. They are the guardians of the plants, but the plants are slowly dying. The trouble started when the Singing Stone was broken in half. That night, Birdie has a dream that takes her to another land, Aventurine.

She is confused about why she is there, but meets friends along the way. There is Kerka, another girl who is there to help Birdie in her mission. The girls meet river maidens (known as mermaids elsewhere) and fairies. Each reveals another piece of Birdie's mission and how she can achieve it. She must heal the land, and to do so, she must heal the Singing Stone and the heartland tree. Can Birdie heal the land, and her family at the same time?

This is the first book in Jan Bozarth's Fairy Grandmother Academy series. Elementary and middle-school girls will be entranced with this story. There is a related website with games, places to write dreams, meet friends, etc. At this point, four books have been written in the series. This book is recommended for young readers, and for parents and grandparents looking for books to buy for their daughters or granddaughters that are exciting and provide a good message about what we are sent to do in the world.