carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Bureau of Lost (Eerie, Indiana, No. 2)

eBook Bureau of Lost (Eerie, Indiana, No. 2) download

by Hearst,John Peel

eBook Bureau of Lost (Eerie, Indiana, No. 2) download ISBN: 0380797755
Author: Hearst,John Peel
Publisher: HarperCollins; First Edition edition (October 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1753 kb
Fb2: 1813 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx lit lrf lit
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Fiction and Fantasy

Like in the previous book, "Bureau of Lost" revisits an episode of the series - Marshall and Simon meet up with Al and .

Like in the previous book, "Bureau of Lost" revisits an episode of the series - Marshall and Simon meet up with Al and Lodgepool who run the Bureau of Lost (where all "missing" items - from briefcases to pencaps - are stored) - and expands it by introducing a Bureau of Missing, a seperate project where famous people (among them are Butch Cassidy, The Sundance Kid, D. Bureau of Lost" reads more like a caper from the old 60's "Batman" series, with the four villains plotting a giant criminal scheme together, than it does like something from "Eerie, Indiana. Also, the purpose for the Bureau of Missing never really made any sense.

The Bureau of Missing in Eerie, Indiana, is home to all the "missing" people who disappear under mysterious circumstances. Elvis is an escapee and roams the streets of Eerie. Now, five dangerous criminals are on the loose. Marshall and Simon must track down Butch Cassidy and other outlaws.

Eerie, Indiana is an American horror science fiction television series that originally aired on NBC from September 15, 1991, to April 12, 1992. The series was created by José Rivera and Karl Schaefer, with Joe Dante serving as creative consultant

Eerie, Indiana is an American horror science fiction television series that originally aired on NBC from September 15, 1991, to April 12, 1992. The series was created by José Rivera and Karl Schaefer, with Joe Dante serving as creative consultant. A total of nineteen episodes were produced. The final episode aired for the first time in 1993, when the series was syndicated on The Disney Channel. The show was rerun on The Disney Channel from October 7, 1993, to late-March 1996.

The Eerie, Indiana book series by multiple authors includes books Return to Foreverware, Bureau of Lost, Eerie Triangle, and several more.

Authors: Mike Ford, Robert James, John Peel, Michael Thomas Ford, Jim Defilice. The Eerie, Indiana book series by multiple authors includes books Return to Foreverware, Bureau of Lost, Eerie Triangle, and several more.

Fandoms: Eerie Indiana, Eerie Indiana: The Other Dimension. No Archive Warnings Apply. Minimum Wage in the Land of the Lost by flashforeward. Fandoms: Eerie Indiana. Teen And Up Audiences. Gen. Work in Progress

Fandoms: Eerie Indiana, Eerie Indiana: The Other Dimension. F/F, F/M, Gen, M/M. Complete Work. Work in Progress.

Related: eerie indiana complete series eerie indiana dvd eerie indiana toy are you afraid of the dark eerie indiana toys eerie indiana vhs eerie . Eerie Indiana: The Eerie Triangle No. 3 by Mike Ford (1997, Paperback).

Related: eerie indiana complete series eerie indiana dvd eerie indiana toy are you afraid of the dark eerie indiana toys eerie indiana vhs eerie indiana shirt. Customs services and international tracking provided.

Eerie doesn't have daylight savings time, but Marshall's determined not to miss out on the extra hour and sets his watch back .

Eerie doesn't have daylight savings time, but Marshall's determined not to miss out on the extra hour and sets his watch back anyway. Melanie arrives in Eerie and both Marshall and his friend Devon fall for her. But when Devon is killed in an accident and his heart is transplanted into Melanie's body, she starts to act a lot like.

Eerie Indiana 2:Bureau of Lost by Peel, John Paperback Book The Cheap Fast Free. 6 Lot Eerie Indiana Jack in the Box Kid’s Twins in a Tub By Hearst Meal Toy. Eerie Indiana - Omri Katz - Promo Sample Video Sleeve/Cover 6 Lot Eerie Indiana Jack in the Box Kid’s Twins in a Tub By Hearst Meal Toy.

The Complete Series DVD cover The books featured new stories, which helped expand the Eerie universe

The Complete Series DVD cover. The books featured new stories, which helped expand the Eerie universe. Similar to the television series, the books focused on Marshall and Simon, as they continue to solve various perplexing phenomena in Eerie. Titles in book series. Return to Foreverware (Mike Ford) (October 1997) ISBN 0-380-79774-7.

Down at the Lost & Found Department in Eerie, something's missing: the Missing People! A power failure has released them from their cryogenic storage chambers, and now Jesse James, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Amelia Earhart and many more are on the loose -- and Marshall and Simon have to get them back. What's worse, some of the world's greatest political criminal minds are getting together for the crime of the century -- only the century they have in mind is over, and they'll be so mad when they find out. If the boys don't think of something fast, these crooks are going to rob a train loaded with gold bullion and escape the Lost & Found -- and Eerie -- once and for all!!

Comments: (2)
Hǻrley Quinn
After a great start ("Return To Foreverware") the second installment in this series is a bit of a letdown. Like in the previous book, "Bureau of Lost" revisits an episode of the series - Marshall and Simon meet up with Al and Lodgepool who run the Bureau of Lost (where all "missing" items - from briefcases to pencaps - are stored) - and expands it by introducing a Bureau of Missing, a seperate project where famous people (among them are Butch Cassidy, The Sundance Kid, DB Cooper and the Flying Dutchman) who have mysteriously vanished are cyrogenically frozen and stored in vaults. When these notorious felons escape, Marshall and Simon are reluctantly called upon to help locate them and get them back where they belong.
"Bureau of Lost" reads more like a caper from the old 60's "Batman" series, with the four villains plotting a giant criminal scheme together, than it does like something from "Eerie, Indiana." Also, the purpose for the Bureau of Missing never really made any sense. The Bureau of Lost, as it was explained in the TV show, existed to keep the economy stable (if people never lost anything, Lodgepool theorized, they'd never buy anything to replace those missing items, thus causing to economy to crash) but there is no apparent reason to keep human beings frozen and stored. Overall, this entry just seemed to be streching it.
Elastic Skunk
It would have been a better story if there were more escapees, a more diverse group rather than just criminals. It seems like the boys didn't get much of a role, and Al and Lodgepoole did all of the work. The plot wasn't nearly as convolutedly awesome as it is in some of the other books in the series, and it was all just too flat and predictable. Maybe it's the switched author? I really don't know, but I miss the style of the other Eerie, Indiana books.