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eBook Merry Go Round in Oz download

by Lauren McGraw,Eloise Jarvis McGraw,Dick Martin

eBook Merry Go Round in Oz download ISBN: 0929605608
Author: Lauren McGraw,Eloise Jarvis McGraw,Dick Martin
Publisher: Books of Wonder (November 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 313
ePub: 1523 kb
Fb2: 1353 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit docx mobi lrf
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Fiction and Fantasy

Merry Go Round in Oz (1963) is the fortieth in the series of Oz books created by L. Frank Baum and his successors.

Merry Go Round in Oz (1963) is the fortieth in the series of Oz books created by L. It was illustrated by Dick Martin. Merry Go Round in Oz is the last of the "Famous Forty" and the last "official" Oz book.

by Lauren McGraw (Author), Eloise Jarvis McGraw (Author), Dick Martin (Illustrator) & 0 more. Neither good nor bad, 'Merry Go Round In Oz' was also the first major Oz novel to almost completely remove itself in tone from the spirit of the classic Oz titles

by Lauren McGraw (Author), Eloise Jarvis McGraw (Author), Dick Martin (Illustrator) & 0 more. Neither good nor bad, 'Merry Go Round In Oz' was also the first major Oz novel to almost completely remove itself in tone from the spirit of the classic Oz titles. The book is not only not a romance, but, despite the prominent appearance of the Easter Bunny, hardly an Oz novel at all. Its very light, crisp manner owes more to Mary Poppins author P. L. Travers than it does to Baum or any of his successors.

Written by Eloise Jarvis McGraw (winner of three Newbery Honor .

Despite being a major advocate for the preservation of the original artwork in the series, none of Dick Martin’s final artwork for the book is known to have survived.

Dick Martin’s original pencil sketch for the cover of the final Oz book: MERRY GO ROUND IN OZ (1960) by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Lauren McGraw Wagner. Despite being a major advocate for the preservation of the original artwork in the series, none of Dick Martin’s final artwork for the book is known to have survived. Also pictured, the book’s full color dust jacket. Courtesy of the C. Warren and Édith Hollister collection.

Nicely illustrated thruout by artist Dick Martin. Bookseller Inventory 1777. Ask Seller a Question. Bibliographic Details

Clean and VG+ in a bright, price-clipped, VG dustjacket. Several small, minor chips along the jacket tips and one small closed tear along the jacket front fold. The date-of-publication, "1963", also written neatly in felt-tip across the spine of the jacket. Still though, a perfectly presentable and attractive copy. Nicely illustrated thruout by artist Dick Martin. Bibliographic Details. Title: Merry Go Round in Oz: Founded on and. Publisher: Reilly and Lee, Chicago.

Take one large portion of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, lend in a half portion, diluted, of King Arthur and The Knights of the Round Table, a dash of Alice - then close your eyes and take a long swallow

Take one large portion of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, lend in a half portion, diluted, of King Arthur and The Knights of the Round Table, a dash of Alice - then close your eyes and take a long swallow. There's a little bit of everything here, starting with an orphan boy, appended to a large and rowdy family - and a carnival merry-go-round, a little magic gnome, and a beguiling merry-go-round mare - and thrust them into a never land where a pack of hounds and some hunters with no other idea in mind capture them. List of adventure on several levels introduces all the other.

McGraw also contributed to the Oz series started by L. Frank Baum; working with her daughter, graphic artist and librarian Lauren Lynn McGraw (Wagner), she wrote Merry Go Round in Oz (the last of the Oz books issued by Baum's publisher) and The Forbidden Fountain of Oz. The actual.

It was written by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Lauren McGraw Wagner (her married name . Eloise Jarvis McGraw was an American author of children's books and young adult novels. On Merry Go Round in Oz. The Oz books. Previous book: The Hidden Valley of Oz.

It was illustrated by Dick Martin. She was awarded the Newbery Honor three times in three different decades, for her novels Moccasin Trail (1952), The Golden Goblet (1962), and The Moorchild (1997). A Really Weird Summer (1977) won an Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery from the Mystery Writers of America.

Merry-Go-Round in Oz (coauthor Lauren Lynn Wagner). The Rundelstone of Oz. The Forbidden Fountain of Oz (coauthor Lauren Lynn Wagner). McGraw’s greatest strength as a writer is her ability to develop plots that keep readers turning the pages to find out what happens next; but even more important, she creates three-dimensional characters whom we come to care about as we would a member of our own family. And with the creation of Shannon Kathleen Lightley, she hit the jackpot.

Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, and Robin Brown, a young boy from Oregon, join old and new friends on a magical quest to solve a mystery.
Comments: (4)
Yanki
1963's 'Merry Go Round In Oz,' written by the mother-daughter team of Eloise and Lauren McGraw, was, as Katherine M. Rogers notes in 'L. Frank Baum: Creator of Oz' (2002), the last Oz title commissioned by a major publisher.

Neither good nor bad, 'Merry Go Round In Oz' was also the first major Oz novel to almost completely remove itself in tone from the spirit of the classic Oz titles.

The book is not only not a romance, but, despite the prominent appearance of the Easter Bunny, hardly an Oz novel at all. Its very light, crisp manner owes more to Mary Poppins author P. L. Travers than it does to Baum or any of his successors.

The book's excellent first chapter finds young foster child Robin Brown accompanying his multiple stepbrothers to an evening carnival in Cherryburg, Oregon.

Continuously overlooked by his well-meaning but rambunctious foster family, Robin enters the carnival with a single coin; the others have all run off with pockets full of money towards their favorite amusements. The McGraws perfectly capture the essence of Robin's physical and emotional isolation from not only his new family, but from the balance of humanity as well. Robin, who is aware of his mistreatment, is thus an archetypal fairytale child protagonist, not unlike fellow orphan Cinderella, bearing up silently and bravely making the best of his predicament.

When Robin, who has modestly hoped for but a single ride on the merry-go-round, meets a strange, ticket-bearing older man dressed in tatters, his fairytale outsider status is confirmed: Robin sees things and meets people that no one else does.

The McGraws cleverly portray the fair grounds in somewhat Bradbury-esque terms: the night carnival is both an all-American, fifties-style entertainment venue of roller coasters, popcorn, and hot dogs as well as Pinocchio's midway of shadowy seduction.

Transgressing the rules of order, Robin uses the illicit ticket provided by the stranger to gain access to the merry-go-round, seats himself atop a beautiful red mare, and momentarily finds himself hurled through the air towards Oz.

Unfortunately, Robin, who gleefully discovers that his mount has sprung to life, lands in the comparatively dull Quadling Kingdom of the Fox Hunters, a place he quickly finds tedious in the extreme.

As readers will be able to attest, Robin is absolutely right: his prolonged captivity among the endlessly talkative, single-minded, faux-British inhabitants represents one of the most overwritten, slowly moving, and irritating misadventures in the entire Oz chronicle.

The authors clearly intend the obsessive, fully adult foxhunters to be amusing, but the writing, while technically crisp, drones on at exactly the same bantering pitch for dozens and dozens of pages. Robin and the reader thus face the same exhausting dilemma.

Meanwhile, in the ostensibly blue Munchkin kingdom of Halidom, a curse of sorts lays over the land: two of the kingdom's magic rings of power have been stolen, and the third, which gives great physical strength to Halidom's people, now mysteriously vanishes.

In Sleeping Beauty fashion, the kingdom falls into lassitude and drowse: only Fess, a young man born in a neighboring land, and an immortal fairy unicorn are immune. Brainless Prince Gules, still half asleep, decides the power rings must be returned to the kingdom, and a quest is born.

In the Emerald City, Ozma and Dorothy decide to hold an Easter party, which necessitates Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion journeying to the realm of the Easter Bunny ("it's down a rabbit hole," says Dorothy) to gather magical eggs. In traditional Oz fashion, the three groups eventually cross paths and unite to solve their various troubles.

Though the later chapters are more imaginative, the book's largest drawback is that too much of it seems to take place in a dry, mundane world that barely resembles Oz.

In fact, the foxhunting chapters seem like sections of another book awkwardly grafted onto a stale facsimile of a traditional Oz title.

While the best of the earlier books have a dreamlike, otherworldly quality, Oz here, in keeping with the trend in children's literature at the time of its publication and since, has few numinous characteristics. In place of romantic, playful, or absurd names like Woot the Wanderer, Ojo the Unlucky, Polychrome the Rainbow's Daughter, Kabumpo, Alexample, and Jenny Jump, the reader is confronted with next-door neighbor monikers like Barry, Richard, and Fred.

The Quadling land is no longer profusely red in color as in the Neill books, where the sky, water, and even in the shade and shadows were scarlet-hued. Oddly, though red is mentioned, the dominant Quadling color inexplicably appears to be pink.

Though ninety-nine percent of previous Oz history goes unmentioned, the McGraws curiously recap the earthly existence/afterlife facet of the Oz chronicle, relaying to readers that Dorothy, among others, has cheated death and reached Oz via otherwise fatal catastrophes (cyclone, earthquake, shipwreck).

Is the tattered stranger Robin meets at the carnival the angel of death, a kind of fairy godfather, or the ghost of his human father? Does the "free ticket" symbolize Robin's passage into death and the heavenly paradise of Oz? Is the somewhat odd inclusion of the Easter Bunny a further metaphor for Robin's death and rebirth?

The authors also let drop another historical Oz bombshell when a Quadling ferryman explains to the gender-neutral named Robin that little girl fairy ruler Ozma was at one time little Munchkin boy Tip. Though Robin "bursts out, delighted," at the news, the McGraws quickly add that this makes Ozma seem "more approachable" in dungaree-wearing Robin's eyes.

'Merry Go Round In Oz' was very likely an attempt by its authors and publisher to reinvent the Oz series for Camelot and 'Leave It To Beaver'-era America. Robin and Fess are likable, sturdy boy heroes, and the characterizations of the Oz royal family are fairly good. If the foxhunters had been removed and the first third of the story reimagined, the book might have left a lasting impact.
Went Tyu
The Oz books divide into good (WIZARD, GLINDA, WISHING HORSE), bad (LOST KING, GIANT HORSE, LUCKY BUCKY), and intermediate (EMERALD CITY, COWARDLY LION, PIRATES). This is a good one, with vivid narration and a meaningful plot. The authors deftly manage three story lines involving a total of nine (!) wandering adventurers, including two American travelers, two long-standing denizens of the Emerald City, and several new native-Ozian protagonists. The old characters are true to earlier depictions and the new ones are all reasonably "Ozzy" (although the title character is a whiner, more of a drip even than Jack Pumpkinhead in MARVELOUS LAND.)

But MERRY-GO-ROUND is also different: It's uniquely moralistic. Even GLINDA, which begins and ends with "Duty", isn't as preachy as this one. This is preachy like Oscar Wilde, in the end about guilt and redemption, subjects which most of the Oz books mercifully avoid. (Merely having the good guys forgive the bad guys in the end does not mean a book is about guilt and redemption. MGR is REALLY about guilt and redemption.)
allegro
Continuing my insane ambition to read virtually every Oz book ever written, this 1963 piece is really an unusual contribution to the Oz mythos. This book is the story of Robin Brown, an orphan who is whisked away to Oz when, riding a merry go round, he managed to grab the fabled brass ring. He and his horse are propelled to Baum's magic land where the horse comes to life and, together, they try to find a way home. Meanwhile, in the tiny Kingdom of Halidom (one of many of the smaller kingdoms in Oz's borders), the royal family awakens to discover the country's third magic circlet has been stolen. Together the three circlets give them wisdom, strength and skill, and with all three lost over the years, they people are rendered nearly useless. The Prince of Halidom and a small band of friends set out to find all three lost circlets.

The book's Oz connections are slim -- Ozma and Dorothy decide to hold an Easter party and Dorothy and the Cowardly Lion set out to visit the Easter Bunny. Along the way, the three groups of adventurers come together in the quest to find the Golden Circlets. The writers (a mother-daughter team) deserve a lot of credit for breaking from the usual Oz pattern, and in fact, Dorothy and the Lion and, in fact, Oz itself could easily be left out of this story without many major changes. Still, together the book is a nice little chapter in the rich history of Oz.
Nern
This was my favorite Oz book as a child. I checked it out numerous times from the base library and I was the only one to check it out. I bought it as soon as I heard it was in print. It was just as good reading it as an adult.